Category: Europa


UK: Payam Tamiz v. Google, [2013] EWCA Civ 68

BAILII     [Home] [Databases] [World Law] [Multidatabase Search] [Help] [Feedback]
England and Wales Court of Appeal (Civil Division) Decisions

You are here: BAILII >> Databases >> England and Wales Court of Appeal (Civil Division) Decisions >> Tamiz v Google Inc [2013] EWCA Civ 68 (14 February 2013)
URL: http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWCA/Civ/2013/68.html
Cite as: [2013] WLR(D) 65, [2013] 1 WLR 2151, [2013] EWCA Civ 68, [2013] EMLR 14
[New search] [Printable RTF version] [View ICLR summary: [2013] WLR(D) 65] [Buy ICLR report: [2013] 1 WLR 2151] [Help]

Neutral Citation Number: [2013] EWCA Civ 68
Case No: A2/2012/0691
IN THE COURT OF APPEAL (CIVIL DIVISION)
ON APPEAL FROM THE HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE
QUEEN’S BENCH DIVISION
Mr Justice Eady
[2012] EWHC 449 (QB)

Royal Courts of Justice
Strand, London, WC2A 2LL
14/02/2013
B e f o r e :

THE MASTER OF THE ROLLS
LORD JUSTICE RICHARDS
and
LORD JUSTICE SULLIVAN
____________________

Between:
Payam Tamiz
Appellant
– and –

Google Inc
Respondent
____________________

Godwin Busuttil (instructed by Brett Wilson LLP) for the Appellant
Antony White QC and Catrin Evans (instructed by Reynolds Porter Chamberlain LLP) for the Respondent
Hearing dates : 3-4 December 2012
____________________

HTML VERSION OF JUDGMENT
____________________

Crown Copyright ©

Lord Justice Richards :

The respondent, Google Inc, is a corporation registered in Delaware and with its principal place of business in California. It provides a range of internet services including Blogger (also referred to as Blogger.com), a service based and managed in the USA but available worldwide. Blogger is a platform that allows any internet user in any part of the world to create an independent blog (web log). The service includes design tools to help users create layouts for their blogs and, if they do not have their own URL (web address), enables them to host their blogs on Blogger URLs. The service itself is free of charge but bloggers can sign up to a linked Google service that enables them to display advertisements on their blogs, the revenues from which are shared between the blogger and Google Inc.
One of the blogs hosted on Blogger bears the name “London Muslim”. The appellant, Mr Tamiz, complains that eight specific comments posted on the London Muslim blog between 28 and 30 April 2011 were defamatory of him. There is an issue, considered below, as to when any complaint was first notified by him to Google Inc. It is common ground, however, that his letter of claim was received by Google Inc in early July 2011; that on 11 August 2011, after further email exchanges, the letter was forwarded to the blogger; and that on 14 August 2011 the blogger voluntarily removed all the comments about which complaint is made.
The appellant seeks to bring a claim in libel against Google Inc in respect of the publication of the allegedly defamatory comments during the period prior to their removal. He was granted permission by Master Eyre to serve the claim form on Google Inc in California. On Google Inc’s subsequent application, however, Eady J held that the court should decline jurisdiction and that the Master’s order for service out of the jurisdiction should therefore be set aside. The judge’s order to that effect is the subject of the present appeal. The judge also held that Google UK Ltd had been joined in the proceedings inappropriately and that there was no triable claim against it. There is no appeal against that aspect of his decision.
In summary, Eady J found that three of the comments were arguably defamatory but that on common law principles Google Inc was not a publisher of the words complained of, whether before it was notified of the complaint or after such notification. If, contrary to that view, Google Inc was to be regarded as a publisher at common law, section 1 of the Defamation Act 1996 (“the 1996 Act”) would provide it with a defence, in particular because it took reasonable care in passing the complaint on to the blogger after it had been notified of it. At this point of his judgment Eady J also indicated his acceptance of a submission that the period between notification and removal of the offending blog was so short as to give rise to potential liability on the part of Google Inc only for a very limited period, such that the court should regard its potential liability as so trivial as not to justify the maintenance of the proceedings, in accordance with the principles in Jameel (Yousef) v Dow Jones & Co Inc [2005] QB 946. Nevertheless he went on to consider an alternative defence under regulation 19 of the Electronic Commerce (EC Directive) Regulations 2002 (“the 2002 Regulations”), which he held would provide Google Inc with a defence if it were otherwise needed.
The main issues in the appeal, taking them in the order in which they were considered by the judge below, are (1) whether there is an arguable case that Google Inc was a publisher of the comments, (2) whether, if it was a publisher, it would have an unassailable defence under section 1 of the 1996 Act, (3) whether any potential liability was so trivial as not to justify the maintenance of the proceedings, and (4) whether Google Inc would have a defence, if otherwise necessary, under regulation 19 of the 2002 Regulations.
Before considering those issues it is necessary to say a little more about various background matters.
The comments themselves

An article in the Evening Standard on 27 April 2011 contained an allegation that the appellant had resigned as a Conservative Party candidate for local elections in Thanet after it had been discovered that his Facebook site referred to women as “sluts”. The appellant sued separately in respect of that article and the proceedings were settled by a consent order. The topic was picked up in an article posted on the London Muslim blog on 27 April. This gave rise to a number of comments posted anonymously over the next three days. The comments complained of are set out in Eady J’s judgment at [7]. The judge held that five of the comments could be characterised in this context as “mere vulgar abuse” to which no sensible person would attach much, if any, weight (see Smith v ADVFN Plc [2008] EWHC 1797 (QB) at [13]-[17], and Clift v Clarke [2011] EWHC 1164 (QB) at [32] and [36]). He found, however, that three of the comments (Comments A, B and D) were arguably defamatory. They included allegations that the appellant was a drug dealer, had stolen from his employers and was hypocritical in his attitude towards women.
The arguments on the appeal included a brief submission that the judge ought also to have found other comments to be arguably defamatory: in particular, Comment E which contained a suggestion that the appellant had made a fake asylum claim. But the judge directed himself correctly and I see no sufficient basis for interfering with the assessment he made on this issue.
Notification of the complaint

On the evidence before him, the judge dealt with the factual issue of notification as follows:
“15. According to Mr Tamiz, he first notified his complaint on 28 or 29 April 2011 (i.e. as the postings were taking place) when he used the “Report Abuse” function on the relevant web page. What became of this remains unclear.
16. A letter of claim was sent on 29 June to Google UK Ltd, which was received on 5 July. This complained of the original article, as being defamatory and untrue, although it was not subsequently sued upon in these proceedings. Complaint was also made of what is now described as Comment A. This letter was passed by Google UK Ltd to Google Inc, which responded to Mr Tamiz by email on 8 July. Clarification was sought as to whether the comment in question was said to be untrue, since his letter had not apparently made that clear. It was at this stage that it was pointed out to Mr Tamiz that the blogger service had nothing to do with Google UK Ltd.
17. Mr Tamiz responded promptly on 8 July to the effect that Comment A was indeed “false and defamatory”. At this stage, he introduced a complaint about Comment B as well.
18. The ‘Blogger Team’ within Google Inc sent a further email to Mr Tamiz on 19 July, seeking his permission to forward his complaint to the author of the blog page. He was told, however, that Google Inc itself would not be removing the post complained of. Mr Tamiz responded by giving the necessary permission on 22 July.
19. In that email of 22 July, Mr Tamiz complained about a further five comments on the blog, now identified as Comments C, D, E, F and G. He confirmed that these were alleged to be defamatory and it seemed to be implicit also that he was characterising them as untrue.
20. After considerable delay, Google Inc forwarded the letter of claim to the blogger on 11 August of last year and informed Mr Tamiz that it had done so. As I have said, on 14 August the article and all the comments were removed by the blogger himself. Mr Tamiz was accordingly notified by Google Inc the following day ….”
In his particulars of claim the appellant alleged that between 29 April and the letter of claim he made various telephone calls to Google UK Ltd and sent two letters, dated 29 April and 23 May, to that company’s offices. Those allegations were not admitted by the defendants and were not supported by evidence at the hearing before Eady J. The defendants also contended that communications to Google UK Ltd were not capable of constituting notification to Google Inc. The transcript of the hearing makes it tolerably clear that the appellant was content in the event to proceed on the basis that the date of notification of the complaint to Google Inc was the date when the letter of claim was forwarded to Google Inc by Google UK Ltd, which fell between 5 July (when Google UK Ltd received the letter) and 8 July (when Google Inc first contacted the appellant by email). All this fits with the way the judge dealt with the matter in the passage quoted above.
The appellant has applied to adduce fresh evidence on the appeal, in the form of a witness statement in which he gives detailed further information about the Blogger service and about his dealings with Google UK Ltd and Google Inc, exhibiting inter alia copies of the two letters allegedly sent by him to Google UK Ltd. If that evidence is admitted, Google Inc applies to adduce fresh evidence in response, by way of a witness statement asserting that Google UK Ltd has no record of receiving any telephone calls or letters from the appellant prior to the letter of claim, and giving an update on the procedure for complaints about postings on Blogger.
Ladd v Marshall [1954] 1 WLR 1489 remains central to the exercise of the court’s discretion as to the receipt of fresh evidence under CPR 52.11(2) (see the discussion at para 52.11.2 of Civil Procedure 2012). The first condition in Ladd v Marshall is plainly not met in this case: the evidence the appellant now seeks to adduce could have been obtained with reasonable diligence for use at the hearing below. Indeed, in practice the issue to which the evidence relates fell away at that hearing, since the appellant was content to proceed on the narrower basis that the letter of claim constituted notification of his complaint. I bear in mind that at that stage of the proceedings he was representing himself but I attach relatively little weight to that consideration because he is a law graduate and, as appears from the transcript of the hearing, is intelligent and articulate. Taking everything into account, I do not consider that the case for admission of the fresh evidence has been made out. The issues in the appeal ought in my view to be determined on the factual basis on which the judge proceeded.
Google Inc’s policy

Google Inc’s policy towards the content of blogs hosted by Blogger at the material time is set out in a witness statement of Mr Jaron Lewis, a solicitor with conduct of the company’s case:
“9. Blogger.com is not involved with the creation of content that people post on their blogs. It does not create, select, solicit, vet or approve that content, which is published and controlled by the blog owners ….
10. Blogger.com does operate a ‘Content Policy’ which sets out restrictions on what users can do using the service …. This makes clear that content such as child pornography, or promoting race hatred, is prohibited. The policy is explained in the following terms:
‘Blogger is a free service for communication, self-expression and freedom of speech. We believe that Blogger increases the availability of information, encourages healthy debate and makes possible new connections between people.
We respect our users’ ownership of and responsibility for the content they choose to share. It is our belief that censoring this content is contrary to a service that bases itself on freedom of expression.
In order to uphold these values, we need to curb abuses that threaten our ability to provide this service and the freedom of expression it encourages. As a result, there are some boundaries on the type of content that can be hosted with Blogger. The boundaries we have defined are those that both comply with legal requirements and that serve to enhance the service as a whole.’
11. [Google Inc] also operates a ‘Report Abuse’ feature …. There are eight grounds for reporting abuse, and users have to select one of these. The eight listed are …
Defamation/Libel/Slander

12. If the user selects ‘Defamation/Libel/Slander’, which is what appears to have happened in this case …, a second screen is displayed.
13. The second screen makes clear that the Blogger.com service is operated in accordance with US law, and that defamatory material will only be taken down if it has been found to be libellous (i.e. unlawful) by a court. The reason for this policy is that under US law, [Google Inc] is not a publisher of third party content hosted on blogspot.com. US law works on the basis that claimants must raise their defamation issues directly with the author of the material, not third party service providers such as Blogger.com.
14. Given the volume of content uploaded by users of the Blogger service, it is usually not practicable for [Google Inc] to remove content without first receiving the Court’s determination that the content is, in fact, libellous. Google is not in a position to adjudicate such disputes itself.”
In this case Google Inc appears to have gone slightly further than the stated policy, in that the email of 11 August 2011 by which it passed on to the blogger the details of the appellant’s complaint contained an actual request to “please remove the allegedly defamatory content in your blog within three (3) days of today’s date”. The blogger complied with that request.
Whether Google Inc was a publisher of the comments

The appellant’s pleaded case relates to the period after Google Inc had been notified of his complaint. As Eady J observed, it is therefore only necessary to assess potential legal liability from the point of notification. Nevertheless the judge’s reasons and the arguments in this court extended to the position before as well as after notification.
At [35]-[38] of his judgment, the judge noted inter alia that it was virtually impossible for Google Inc to exercise editorial control over the content of the blogs it hosts, which in the aggregate contain more than half a trillion words, with 250,000 new words added every minute. He referred to the submission that it would be unrealistic to attribute responsibility for publication of material on any particular blog to Google Inc, whether before or after notification of a complaint. He also referred to the importance of striving to achieve consistency in decisions in the face of rapidly developing technology, and to paying proper regard to the values enshrined in the ECHR. He said that the fact that an entity in Google Inc’s position had been notified of a complaint did not immediately convert its status or role into that of a publisher. If Google Inc’s status before notification of a complaint was that of a provider or a facilitator, it was not easy to see why that role should be expanded thereafter into that of a person who authorised or acquiesced in publication. Google Inc claimed to remain as neutral in the process after notification as it was before. It might be true that it had the technical capability of taking down blogs or comments on its platform, yet that was not by any means the same as saying that it had become an author or authoriser of the publication:
“It is no doubt often true that the owner of a wall which has been festooned, overnight, with defamatory graffiti could acquire scaffolding and have it all deleted with whitewash. That is not necessarily to say, however, that the unfortunate owner must, unless and until this has been accomplished, be classified as a publisher.”
The judge went on at [39] to attach significance to the evidence that Google Inc was not required to take any positive step, technically, in the process of continuing the accessibility of the offending material: he said that its role as a platform provider was “a purely passive one”. The situation was thus in his view closely analogous to that described in Bunt v Tilley [2007] 1 WLR 1243, and in striving to achieve consistency in the court’s decision-making he would rule that Google Inc was not liable at common law as a publisher.
Bunt v Tilley concerned internet service providers (ISPs) who were not alleged to have hosted any website relevant to the claims. The issue was whether they could be liable simply in respect of defamatory material communicated via the services they provided. Eady J was again the judge. In a central passage of his judgment he said this:
“21. In determining responsibility for publication in the context of the law of defamation, it seems to me to be important to focus on what the person did, or failed to do, in the chain of communication. It is clear that the state of a defendant’s knowledge can be an important factor. If a person knowingly permits another to communicate information which is defamatory, when there would be an opportunity to prevent the publication, there would seem to be no reason in principle why liability should not accrue. So too, if the true position were that the applicants had been (in the claimant’s words) responsible for ‘corporate sponsorship and approval of their illegal activities’.
22. I have little doubt, however, that to impose legal responsibility upon anyone under the common law for the publication of words it is essential to demonstrate a degree of awareness or at least an assumption of general responsibility, such as has long been recognised in the context of editorial responsibility. As Lord Morris commented in McLeod v St Aubyn [1899] AC 549, 562: ‘A printer and publisher intends to publish, and so intending cannot plead as a justification that he did not know the contents. The appellant in this case never intended to publish.’ In that case the relevant publication consisted in handing over an unread copy of a newspaper for return the following day. It was held that there was no sufficient degree of awareness or intention to impose legal responsibility for that ‘publication’.
23. Of course, to be liable for a defamatory publication it is not always necessary to be aware of the defamatory content, still less of its legal significance. Editors and publishers are often fixed with responsibility notwithstanding such lack of knowledge. On the other hand, for a person to be held responsible there must be knowing involvement in the process of publication of the relevant words [emphasis in the original]. It is not enough that a person merely plays a passive instrumental role in the process. (See also in this context Emmens v Pottle (1885) 16 QBD 354, 357, per Lord Esher MR.)”
At [36] he held that an ISP which performs no more than a passive role in facilitating postings on the internet cannot be deemed to be a publisher at common law. A telephone company or other passive medium of communication, such as an ISP, is not analogous to someone in the position of a distributor, who might at common law be treated as having published so as to need a defence.
In Metropolitan International Schools Ltd v Designtechnica Corpn [2011] 1 WLR 1743 Eady J applied a similar analysis in relation to defamatory comments which, having been posted on a website, appeared as a “snippet” of information when an internet search was carried out under the claimant’s name on Google Inc’s search engine. The judge said that for a person to be fixed at common law with responsibility for publishing defamatory words, there needed to be a mental element, as summarised in Bunt v Tilley. He held that the search in issue was performed automatically and involved no input from Google Inc, which had not authorised or caused the snippet to appear on the user’s screen in any meaningful sense but had merely by the provision of its search service played the role of a facilitator. As to the position once Google Inc had been informed of the defamatory content of the snippet, the judge said that a person can be liable for the publication of libel by acquiescence, that is to say by permitting publication to continue when he or she has the power to prevent it. He drew a distinction between a search engine and someone hosting a website, pointing to the greater difficulty of ensuring that offending words do not appear on a search snippet. Google Inc’s “take-down” procedure might not have operated as rapidly as the claimant would wish, but it did not follow as a matter of law that between notification and take-down Google Inc became liable as a publisher of the offending material. While efforts were being made to achieve a take-down in relation to a particular URL it was hardly possible to fix Google Inc with liability on the basis of authorisation, approval or acquiescence. On the facts of the case, he believed it unrealistic to attribute responsibility for publication to Google Inc.
At the forefront of the appellant’s submissions to this court was an elaborate attack on Bunt v Tilley as applied in Metropolitan International Schools Ltd and the present case. Mr Busuttil submitted that the reasoning in Bunt v Tilley erroneously conflated a number of different threads of law. What Eady J said about the need for “knowing involvement in the process of publication of the relevant words” is at odds with the principle of strict liability for publication, irrespective of knowledge of the defamatory words. Further, in certain circumstances a person may be or become involved in publishing defamatory material by omission, by failing or forbearing to take a step that ought to have been taken, or by remaining passive. The judge’s reasoning does not accurately reflect the distinction between a primary publisher and a secondary publisher (for whom alone the common law defence of innocent dissemination is available). Nor does the reasoning take proper account of the principles of vicarious liability or agency as they apply to render corporations liable for the publication of defamatory material by employees or agents. Mr Busuttil drew our attention to numerous domestic and Commonwealth authorities, submitting in particular that the courts in Australia have not accepted the Bunt v Tilley analysis (see e.g. Trkulja v Google Inc (No.5) [2012] VSC 533, a decision of the Supreme Court of Victoria), although the analysis has been followed by the Canadian Supreme Court (see Crookes v Newton [2011] 3 SCR 269).
Mr Busuttil submitted that Google Inc is a corporation in the business of publishing, acting not just through its employees but also through the myriad of bloggers and all those who post comments on the blogs. It has control over the blogger, who in turn has control over the comments posted on the blog. Google Inc is therefore to be regarded as a primary publisher, potentially liable for defamatory material on the blogs, irrespective of knowledge or fault and irrespective of whether it has been notified of any complaint, subject however to any statutory defences. Alternatively it is a secondary publisher, facilitating publication in a manner analogous to a distributor, subject to the common law defence of innocent dissemination as well as to statutory defences, though it will be difficult to establish the defence of innocent dissemination if it has the power to prevent continuing publication and chooses not to exercise that power.
I do not find it necessary to address the full detail of Mr Busuttil’s criticisms of Bunt v Tilley. I am not persuaded that Eady J fell into any fundamental error of analysis or reached the wrong conclusion in relation to the kind of internet service under consideration in that case. For the reasons set out below, however, I respectfully differ from Eady J’s view that the present case is so closely analogous to Bunt v Tilley as to call for the same conclusion. In my view the judge was wrong to regard Google Inc’s role in respect of Blogger blogs as a purely passive one and to attach the significance he did to the absence of any positive steps by Google Inc in relation to continued publication of the comments in issue.
By the Blogger service Google Inc provides a platform for blogs, together with design tools and, if required, a URL; it also provides a related service to enable the display of remunerative advertisements on a blog. It makes the Blogger service available on terms of its own choice and it can readily remove or block access to any blog that does not comply with those terms (a point of distinction with the search engine under consideration in Metropolitan International Schools Ltd, as the judge himself noted in that case). As a matter of corporate policy and no doubt also for reasons of practicality, it does not seek to exercise prior control over the content of blogs or comments posted on them, but it defines the limits of permitted content and it has the power and capability to remove or block access to offending material to which its attention is drawn.
By the provision of that service Google Inc plainly facilitates publication of the blogs (including the comments posted on them). Its involvement is not such, however, as to make it a primary publisher of the blogs. It does not create the blogs or have any prior knowledge of, or effective control over, their content. It is not in a position comparable to that of the author or editor of a defamatory article. Nor is it in a position comparable to that of the corporate proprietor of a newspaper in which a defamatory article is printed. Such a corporation may be liable as a primary publisher by reason of the involvement of its employees or agents in the publication. But there is no relationship of employment or agency between Google Inc and the bloggers or those posting comments on the blogs: such people are plainly independent of Google Inc and do not act in any sense on its behalf or in its name. The appellant’s reliance on principles of vicarious liability or agency in this context is misplaced.
I am also very doubtful about the argument that Google Inc’s role is that of a secondary publisher, facilitating publication in a manner analogous to a distributor. In any event it seems to me that such an argument can get nowhere in relation to the period prior to notification of the complaint. There is a long established line of authority that a person involved only in dissemination is not to be treated as a publisher unless he knew or ought by the exercise of reasonable care to have known that the publication was likely to be defamatory: Emmens v Pottle (1885) 16 QBD 354, 357-358; Vizetelly v Mudie’s Select Library Ltd [1900] 2 QB 170, 177-180; Bottomley v FW Woolworth and Co Ltd (1932) 48 TLR 521. There are differences in the reasoning in support of that conclusion but the conclusion itself is clear enough. The principle operated in Bottomley to absolve Woolworth from liability for publication of a defamatory article in a consignment of remaindered American magazines that it distributed: the company did not check every magazine for defamatory content, there was nothing in the nature of the individual magazine which should have led it to suppose that the magazine contained a libel, and it had not been negligent in failing to carry out a periodical examination of specimen magazines. Since it cannot be said that Google Inc either knew or ought reasonably to have known of the defamatory comments prior to notification of the appellant’s complaint, that line of authority tells against viewing Google Inc as a secondary publisher prior to such notification. Moreover, even if it were to be so regarded, it would have an unassailable defence during that period under section 1 of the 1996 Act, considered below.
In relation to the position after notification of the complaint, however, additional considerations arise, and it is in relation to this period that I take a different view from that of Eady J on the issue of publication. I am led to do so primarily by the decision of the Court of Appeal in Byrne v Deane [1937] 1 KB 818. That case concerned an allegedly defamatory verse which someone had posted on the wall of a golf club and which was then allowed to remain there for some days. The defendants, who had not been involved in the initial publication, were the proprietors of the golf club, and one of them was also the club secretary. One of the rules of the club provided that “no notice or placard shall be posted in the club premises without the consent of the secretary”. The court held by a majority that the words of the verse were not capable of a defamatory meaning, but all three members of the court agreed that there was evidence of publication by one or both of the defendants. Greer LJ expressed the point in this way (at page 830):
“In my judgment the two proprietors of this establishment by allowing the defamatory statement, if it be defamatory, to rest upon their wall and not to remove it, with the knowledge that they must have had that by not removing it it would be read by people to whom it would convey such meaning as it had, were taking part in the publication of it.”
Slesser LJ considered there to be evidence of publication by the secretary but not by the other defendant. In relation to the secretary he said this (at pages 834-835):
“There are cases which go to show that persons who themselves take no overt part in the publication of defamatory matter may nevertheless so adopt and promote the reading of the defamatory matter as to constitute themselves liable for the publication ….
… She said ‘I read it. It seemed to me somebody was rather annoyed with somebody.’ I think having read it, and having dominion over the walls of the club as far as the posting of notices was concerned, it could properly be said that there was some evidence that she did promote and associate herself with the continuance of the publication.”
Greene LJ agreed with Greer LJ that there was evidence of publication by both defendants. His reasons included the following (at pages 837-838):
“It is said that as a general proposition where the act of the person alleged to have published a libel has not been any positive act, but has merely been the refraining from doing some act, he cannot be guilty of publication. I am quite unable to accept any such general proposition. It may very well be that in some circumstances a person, by refraining from removing or obliterating the defamatory matter, is not committing any publication at all. In other circumstances he may be doing so. The test it appears to me is this: having regard to all the facts of the case is the proper inference that by not removing the defamatory matter the defendant really made himself responsible for its continued presence in the place where it had been put?”
Byrne v Deane was considered in Godfrey v Demon Internet Ltd [2001] QB 201, in which the defendant ISP received and stored on its news server a defamatory article which had been posted by an unknown person using another ISP. The plaintiff notified the defendant of the article and asked it to remove the article, but the defendant failed to do so and the posting remained on the news server for ten days until it expired automatically. The plaintiff claimed against the defendant in respect of that period of ten days. Morland J held that the defendant was liable. Whilst he cited the passage from Greene LJ’s judgment in Byrne v Deane quoted above, he rested his decision on the broader ground that whenever there was a transmission of a defamatory posting from the storage of the defendant’s news server, the defendant was a publisher of that posting but had a defence under section 1 of the 1996 Act until it lost that defence as a result of the plaintiff’s notification.
More directly in point is Davison v Habeeb and Others [2011] EWHC 3031 (QB), which concerned defamatory material posted on a blog hosted by Google Inc itself. HHJ Parkes QC, sitting as a deputy judge of the High Court, considered it arguable that Google Inc was a publisher from the outset, subject to the defence under section 1 of the 1996 Act, but he also relied on Byrne v Deane as an alternative strand in the reasoning that led him to conclude that there was an arguable case against Google Inc:
“38. … The analogy between the ISPs which Eady J was considering in Bunt v Tilley … and the postal service was an apt one, because the ISPs in that case, like the postal or indeed the telephone services, were simply conduits, or facilitators, enabling messages to be carried from one person, or one computer, to another. Blogger.com, by contrast, is not simply a facilitator, or at least not in the same way as the ISPs. It might be seen as analogous to a gigantic noticeboard which is in [Google Inc’s] control, in the sense that [Google Inc] provides the noticeboard for users to post their notices on, and it can take the notices down (like the club secretary in Byrne v Deane …) if they are pointed out to it. However, pending notification it cannot possibly have the slightest familiarity with the notices posted, because the noticeboard contains such a vast and constantly growing volume of material. On that analogy, it ought not to be viewed as a publisher until (at the earliest) it has been notified that it is carrying defamatory material so that, by not taking it down, it can fairly be taken to have consented to and participated in publication by the primary publisher. The alternative is to say that, like Demon Internet in Godfrey v Demon Internet Ltd…, it chose to host material which turned out to be defamatory, and which it was open to anyone to download, so that at common law it was prima facie liable for publication of the material, subject to proof that it lacked the necessary mental state.

42. … In my view it must be at least arguable that [Google Inc] should properly be seen as a publisher responding to requests for downloads like Demon Internet, rather than a mere facilitator, playing a passive instrumental role.

47. Even if [Google Inc] should properly be seen as a facilitator, the mere provider of a gigantic noticeboard on which others published defamatory material, in my judgment it must also at least be arguable that at some point after notification [Google Inc] became liable for continued publication of the material complained of on the Byrne v Deane principle of consent or acquiescence.”
The principles in Byrne v Deane have also been applied in the context of website or search engine content in a number of Commonwealth cases to which Mr Busuttil drew our attention: see, in particular, Sadiq v Baycorp (NZ) Limited [2008] NZHC 403 and A v Google New Zealand Ltd [2012] NZHC 2352.
In the present case, Eady J referred at [32]-[33] to Godfrey v Demon Internet Ltd and to Davison v Habeeb, observing that the position may well be fact sensitive: liability may turn upon the extent to which the relevant ISP has knowledge of the words complained of, and of their illegality or potential illegality, and/or on the extent to which it has control over publication. In relation to Blogger he said nothing about HHJ Parkes QC’s analogy with the provision of a gigantic notice board on which others post comments. Instead, he drew an analogy with ownership of a wall on which various people choose to inscribe graffiti, for which the owner is not responsible (see [16] above). I have to say that I find the notice board analogy far more apposite and useful than the graffiti analogy. The provision of a platform for the blogs is equivalent to the provision of a notice board; and Google Inc goes further than this by providing tools to help a blogger design the layout of his part of the notice board and by providing a service that enables a blogger to display advertisements alongside the notices on his part of the notice board. Most importantly, it makes the notice board available to bloggers on terms of its own choice and it can readily remove or block access to any notice that does not comply with those terms.
Those features bring the case in my view within the scope of the reasoning in Byrne v Deane. Thus, if Google Inc allows defamatory material to remain on a Blogger blog after it has been notified of the presence of that material, it might be inferred to have associated itself with, or to have made itself responsible for, the continued presence of that material on the blog and thereby to have become a publisher of the material. Mr White QC submitted that the vast difference in scale between the Blogger set-up and the small club-room in Byrne v Deane makes such an inference unrealistic and that nobody would view a comment on a blog as something with which Google Inc had associated itself or for which it had made itself responsible by taking no action to remove it after notification of a complaint. Those are certainly matters for argument but they are not decisive in Google Inc’s favour at this stage of proceedings, where we are concerned only with whether the appellant has an arguable case against it as a publisher of the comments in issue.
I do not consider that such an inference could properly be drawn until Google Inc had had a reasonable time within which to act to remove the defamatory comments. It will be recalled that on the judge’s findings the letter of claim containing the complaint about Comment A was received on or about 5 July 2011 (and certainly by 8 July), the complaint about Comment B was introduced in the appellant’s response to Google Inc on 8 July, and the complaint about Comment D was introduced on 22 July. The letter of claim was forwarded to the blogger on 11 August and the material was all removed on 14 August. That means that in relation to Comments A and B, in particular, a period of over five weeks elapsed between notification and removal. In the context of the defence under section 1 of the 1996 Act, considered below, Eady J described Google Inc’s response as somewhat dilatory but not outside the bounds of a reasonable response. Whilst I accept the judge’s assessment in the context of the statutory defence, it is in my view open to argument that the time taken was sufficiently long to leave room for an inference adverse to Google Inc on Byrne v Deane principles.
The period during which Google Inc might fall to be treated on that basis as a publisher of the defamatory comments would be a very short one, but it means that the claim cannot in my view be dismissed on the ground that Google Inc was clearly not a publisher of the comments at all.
The defence under section 1 of the 1996 Act

I therefore turn to consider the defence under section 1 of the 1996 Act. That section provides:
“(1) In defamation proceedings a person has a defence if he shows that –
(a)    he was not the author, editor or publisher of the statement complained of,
(b)    he took reasonable care in relation to its publication, and
(c)    he did not know, and had no reason to believe, that what he did caused or contributed to the publication of a defamatory statement.
(2) For this purpose ‘author’, ‘editor’ and ‘publisher’ have the following meanings, which are further explained in subsection (3) –
‘author’ means the originator of the statement, but does not include a person who did not intend that his statement be published at all;
‘editor’ means a person having editorial or equivalent responsibility for the content of the statement or the decision to publish it; and
‘publisher’ means a commercial publisher, that is, a person whose business is issuing material to the public, or a section of the public, who issues material containing the statement in the course of that business.
(3) A person shall not be considered the author, editor or publisher of a statement if he is only involved –
(a)    in printing, producing, distributing or selling printed material containing the statement;
(b) in processing, making copies of, distributing, exhibiting or selling a film or sound recording (as defined in Part I of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988) containing the statement;
(c)    in processing, making copies of, distributing or selling any electronic medium in or on which the statement is recorded, or in operating or providing any equipment, system or service by means of which the statement is retrieved, copied, distributed or made available in electronic form;
(d)    as the broadcaster of a live programme containing the statement in circumstances in which he has no effective control over the maker of the statement;
(e)    as the operator of or provider of access to a communications system by means of which the statement is transmitted, or made available, by a person over whom he has no effective control.
In a case not within paragraphs (a) to (e) the court may have regard to those provisions by way of analogy in deciding whether a person is to be considered the author, editor or publisher of a statement.
(4) Employees or agents of an author, editor or publisher are in the same position as the employer or principal to the extent that they are responsible for the content of the statement or the decision to publish it.
(5) In determining for the purposes of this section whether a person took reasonable care, or had reason to believe that what he did caused or contributed to the publication of a defamatory statement, regard shall be had to –
(a)    the extent of his responsibility for the content of the statement or the decision to publish it,
(b)    the nature or circumstances of the publication, and
(c)    the previous conduct or character of the author, editor or publisher.”
It will be seen that the conditions in subsection (1) are cumulative. Eady J held at [42]-[51] that all three conditions were satisfied in this case.
As to subsection (1)(a), he held that Google Inc was not a “publisher” for these purposes even if, contrary to his primary conclusion, it was to be treated at common law as having been a publisher of the defamatory comments. It did not come within the definition of “commercial publisher” within subsection (2) since in operating the Blogger service it did not itself issue material to the public or a section of the public and, specifically, it did not issue material containing the statements complained of. Eady J also drew support from subsection (3)(e), taking the view that Google Inc could accurately be characterised as providing access to a communications system by means of which the statements were transmitted or made available by a person over whom it had no effective control: by “effective control” it was likely that the draftsman had in mind effective day-to-day control rather than the possibility of intervention in reliance on a contractual term about the permitted content of a web page.
I see no reason to disagree with the judge’s conclusion on that point. In particular, I do not think that Google Inc can sensibly be said to have “issued” the defamatory comments even if it was involved in their publication in a way capable of attracting liability at common law. Its involvement was of a kind analogous to, if not identical to, that described in subsection (3)(e). I share the judge’s view that the existence of a contractual term about the content of blogs is not sufficient to give it “effective control” over the person who posted the defamatory comments.
As to the conditions in subsection (1)(b) and (c), in my judgment they are plainly satisfied in relation to the period prior to notification of the complaint. There is no basis for concluding in relation to that period that Google Inc failed to take reasonable care in relation to publication of the comments or that it knew or had reason to believe that it caused or contributed to their publication. Greater difficulty arises, however, in relation to the application of the conditions to continued publication of the comments after Google Inc had notice of their allegedly defamatory content.
Thus, the relevant question in relation to subsection (1)(b) is whether Google Inc took reasonable care in relation to the continued publication of the comments. Eady J referred to the submissions of counsel for Google Inc that the company took reasonable care in relation to the appellant’s complaint when it passed the complaint on to the blogger and that this was a proportionate response. The judge held at [47]:
“One could certainly say that the response was somewhat dilatory, but I would not consider it, in all the circumstances of this case, to be outside the bounds of a reasonable response”.
This may have been a generous view but I am not persuaded that it was wrong. The factors in subsection (5), to which regard must be had in determining whether Google Inc took reasonable care, tell in its favour: the company had no responsibility for the content of the comments or the decision to publish them; the circumstances of publication include the vast number of blogs that are hosted on Blogger, which may be said to justify a longer response time; and there is no evidence of anything in the previous conduct of the particular blogger or of those who posted the comments that might have called for speedier action to be taken. The situation is distinguishable from that which caused Morland J to hold in Godfrey v Demon Internet that subsection (1)(b) posed an insuperable difficulty for the defendants since “after receipt of the plaintiff’s fax, the defendants knew of the defamatory posting but chose not to remove it from their … news servers”: it is clear why, in the absence of any steps at all, the judge in that case did not think that reasonable care had been exercised.
The relevant question in relation to subsection (1)(c) is whether it can be said that in the period after notification of the complaint Google Inc did not know, and had no reason to believe, that what it did caused or contributed to the publication of a defamatory statement. The judge’s reasoning on this was very brief. He said at [49] that once the complaint in respect of a relevant comment was notified, Google Inc would have had reason to believe that the comment was defamatory, but that this was “far from saying … that Google Inc would have known, or had reason to believe, that it had done anything to cause or contribute to the publication of any of these statements”. But the very considerations that lead me to conclude that Google Inc arguably became a publisher of the defamatory comments on Byrne v Deane principles also tend towards the conclusion that following notification it knew or had reason to believe that what it did caused or contributed to the continued publication of the comments. The judge in Davison v Habeeb and Others, at [46], thought it arguable in that case that at some point after notification Google Inc knew or had reason to believe that its continued hosting of the material in question caused or contributed to the publication of a defamatory statement. In my view the same can be said in the present case.
Mr White QC submitted that Eady J appeared to have had in mind what was said in Milne v Express Newspapers [2005] 1 WLR 772 about the similar language in section 4(3) of the 1996 Act, to the effect that an offer to make amends under section 2 is a defence unless the person by whom the offer was made “knew or had reason to believe” that the statement complained of (a) referred to the aggrieved party or was likely to be understood as referring to him, and (b) was false and defamatory of that party. The court held in that case that a person knew or had reason to believe that a statement was false if he either knew that it was false or was reckless as to whether it was false, in the sense of not considering or caring whether it was true or not. Eady J made reference to that decision when finding in Bunt v Tilley, at [61], that the condition in subsection (1)(c) was satisfied in relation to one of the ISPs because the email sent to it by the complainant “did not effectively put [it] on notice, and its staff were given no reason to believe that they were causing or contributing to the publication of the postings complained of”. That finding turned, however, on the particular terms of the email in question, and it is difficult to read into the judge’s reasoning in the present case any implied reference either to what he said on this point in Bunt v Tilley or to the decision or reasoning in Milne v Express Newspapers. In any event this line of reasoning does not appear to me to provide a satisfactory answer to the concern I have expressed about the judge’s view of subsection (1)(c) in the present case.
In the light of that concern about subsection (1)(c) I am not satisfied that, if Google Inc were found to be a publisher of the defamatory comments on Byrne v Deane principles, section 1 of the 1996 Act would provide it with an unassailable defence.
For that reason it is necessary to move to the next issue considered by the judge, namely the question whether any potential liability on the part of Google Inc was sufficient to justify the maintenance of the proceedings against it. The judge appeared to treat this as a subsidiary point under his consideration of the statutory defence, but it is in truth a distinct issue which assumes real importance in this case if I am correct in the conclusions I have reached so far.
“Real and substantial tort”

At [50] of his judgment, Eady J accepted an argument by counsel for Google Inc that the period between notification of the complaint and removal of the offending blog was so short as to give rise to any potential liability on the part of Google Inc only for a very limited period, such that the court should regard it as so trivial as not to justify the maintenance of the proceedings. The judge said that, to adopt the words in Jameel (Yousef) v Dow Jones & Co Inc (cited above), “the game would not be worth the candle”.
In Jameel (Yousef) the Court of Appeal upheld an application to strike out as an abuse of process defamation proceedings against the publisher of a US newspaper in respect of an article posted on an internet website in the USA which was available to subscribers in England but had been the subject of minimal publication within this jurisdiction. The court considered that the principles relevant to a strike-out application overlapped with those relevant to an application to set aside permission to serve out of the jurisdiction. It was in the latter context that the question whether “a real and substantial tort has been committed within the jurisdiction” had been developed, but the court considered that the question whether a substantial tort had been committed in the jurisdiction was also relevant to an application to strike out as abuse of process. It held that keeping a proper balance between the article 10 right of freedom of expression and the protection of individual reputation required the court to bring to a stop, as an abuse of process, defamation proceedings that were not serving the legitimate purpose of protecting the claimant’s reputation, which included compensating the claimant only if that reputation had been unlawfully damaged. The court went on to consider whether, on the facts of the case before it, vindication of the claimant’s reputation justified the continuance of the action. It concluded:
“69. If the claimant succeeds in this action and is awarded a small amount of damages, it can perhaps be said that he will have achieved vindication for the damage done to his reputation in this country, but both the damage and the vindication will be minimal. The costs of the exercise will have been out of all proportion to what has been achieved. The game will not merely not have been worth the candle, it will not have been worth the wick.
70. If we were considering an application to set aside permission to serve these proceedings out of the jurisdiction we would allow that application on the basis that the five publications that had taken place in this jurisdiction did not, individually or collectively, amount to a real and substantial tort. Jurisdiction is no longer in issue, but subject to the effect of the claim for an injunction that we have yet to consider, we consider for precisely the same reason that it would not be right to permit this action to proceed. It would be an abuse of the process to continue to commit the resources of the English court, including substantial judge and possibly jury time, to an action where so little is now seen to be at stake ….”
In my judgment, Eady J was plainly right to conclude that the application in the present case to set aside permission to serve out of the jurisdiction should be allowed for like reasons. The allegedly defamatory comments were posted between 28 and 30 April, soon after the initial blog of 27 April. By the very nature of a blog, they will have been followed by numerous other comments in the chain and, whilst still accessible, will have receded into history. As I have indicated, the earliest point at which Google Inc could have become liable in respect of the comments would be some time after notification of the complaint in respect of them. But it is highly improbable that any significant number of readers will have accessed the comments after that time and prior to removal of the entire blog. It follows, as the judge clearly had in mind, that any damage to the appellant’s reputation arising out of continued publication of the comments during that period will have been trivial; and in those circumstances the judge was right to consider that “the game would not be worth the candle”. I do not accept Mr Busuttil’s submission that various other features of the claim, including the fact that the appellant’s name is relatively uncommon and distinctive in this jurisdiction, undermined the judge’s conclusion.
It follows that, despite the fact that I have reached certain conclusions favourable to the appellant on the previous issues, this appeal must in my view fail.
In those circumstances, although the issue was the subject of detailed argument before us, it is unnecessary to consider whether Google Inc would have a defence under regulation 19 of the 2002 Regulations.
Lord Justice Sullivan :

I agree.
Master of the Rolls :

I also agree.
BAILII: Copyright Policy | Disclaimers | Privacy Policy | Feedback | Donate to BAILII
URL: http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWCA/Civ/2013/68.html

Anuncios

Oberlandesgericht Koblenz, Urteil 3 U 1288/13, Loeschung, Nacktfotos, Fotos

Aktenzeichen: 3 U 1288/13 LG Koblenz

Verkündet
am 20.05.2014
Weitzel, Justizsekretärin
als Urkundsbeamtin der Geschäftsstelle

Oberlandesgericht Koblenz

IM NAMEN DES VOLKES

URTEIL

In dem Rechtsstreit
…..

Beklagter, Berufungskläger und Berufungsbeklagter,

– Prozessbevollmächtigter: Rechtsanwalt …

gegen

Klägerin, Berufungsbeklagte und Berufungsklägerin,

– Prozessbevollmächtigte: Rechtsanwälte …

hat der 3. Zivilsenat des Oberlandesgerichts Koblenz durch den Vorsitzenden Richter am Oberlandesgericht Grünewald, die Richterin am Oberlandesgericht Haberkamp und den Richter am Oberlandesgericht Dr. Reinert auf Grund der mündlichen Verhandlung vom 8. April 2014

für Recht erkannt:

1)    Die Berufungen der Klägerin und des Beklagten gegen das Teil-, Anerkenntnis- und Endurteil der 1. Zivilkammer des Landgerichts Koblenz – Einzelrichter – vom 24. September 2013 werden zurückgewiesen.

2)    Die Kosten des Berufungsverfahrens werden gegeneinander aufgehoben.

3)    Das Urteil ist vorläufig vollstreckbar.

4)    Die Revision wird zugelassen.

Gründe:

I.

Die Klägerin nimmt den Beklagten auf Löschung von sie zeigenden Lichtbildern und Filmaufnahmen in Anspruch, die sich auf elektronischen Vervielfältigungsstücken des Beklagten befinden.

Die Parteien hatten in der Vergangenheit eine Beziehung. Der Beklagte, der von Beruf Fotograf ist, erstellte während dieser Zeit zahlreiche Bild­aufnahmen von der Klägerin, auf denen diese unbekleidet und teilweise bekleidet sowie vor, während und nach dem Geschlechtsverkehr mit dem Beklagten zu sehen ist. Teilweise hat die Klägerin intime Fotos selbst erstellt und dem Beklagten in digitalisierter Form überlassen. Zudem besitzt der Beklagte Lichtbilder von der Klägerin, die sie bei alltägli­chen Handlungen ohne intimen Bezug zeigen.

Nach Beendigung der Beziehung leitete der Beklagte verschiedene ihm zuvor von der Klägerin übersandte E-Mails an die Fir­menadresse des Zeugen …[A], dem Ehemann der Klägerin, weiter. Dadurch erhielten Mitarbeiter die Möglichkeit, Einsicht in die E-Mails zu nehmen. Eine von dem Zeugen …[A] eingerichtete technische Blockade der E-Mail-Adresse des Beklagten umging dieser, indem er von einer neuen, zuvor unbekannten Adresse weitere E-Mails an den Zeugen …[A] sendete und dabei auch aus von der Klägerin an ihn gerichteten intimen E-Mails zitierte. Auf Antrag des Zeugen …[A] erließ das Amtsgericht Frankfurt am 07.06.2013 eine einstweilige Verfügung, wonach es dem Beklagten untersagt wurde, an den Zeugen E-Mails zu senden (Anlage K 12, GA 135).

Die Klägerin hat den Beklagten zunächst u. a. auch in Anspruch genommen, es zu unterlassen, sie, die Klägerin zeigende Licht­bilder und/oder Filmaufnahmen ohne ihre Einwilligung Dritten und/oder öf­fentlich zugänglich zu machen oder machen zu lassen, von ihr erhaltene E-Mails und/oder Textnachrichten über Skype und/oder SMS ohne ihre Ein­willigung Dritten und/oder öffentlich zugänglich zu machen oder machen zu lassen, sowie E-Mails und/oder SMS und/oder sonstige elektronische Nachrichten an sie, die Klägerin, zu senden.

Nachdem die Parteien sich in der mündlichen Verhandlung vor dem Landgericht durch einen Teilvergleich geeinigt haben, dass der Beklagte die vorgenannten Anträge anerkennt und die Klägerin weitergehende Anträge zurücknimmt, hat die Klägerin, soweit im Berufungsverfahren noch von Interesse, zuletzt beantragt,

den  Beklagten zu verurteilen, die in seinem unmittelbaren oder mittelbaren Besitz befindlichen elektronischen Vervielfältigungsstücke von die Klägerin zeigenden Lichtbildern und/oder Filmaufnahmen vollständig zu löschen.

Der Beklagte hat beantragt,

die Klage insoweit abzuweisen.

Das Landgericht hat den Beklagten, soweit im Berufungsverfahren von Interesse, durch Teil-, Anerkenntnis- und Endurteil unter Abweisung des weitergehenden Löschungsantrages verurteilt,

die in seinem unmittelbaren oder mittelbaren Besitz befindlichen elektronischen Vervielfältigungsstücke von die Klägerin zeigenden Lichtbildern und/oder Filmaufnahmen, auf denen die Klägerin

– in unbekleidetem Zustand,

– in teilweise unbekleidetem Zustand, soweit der Intimbereich der Klägerin

(Brust und/oder Geschlechtsteil) zu sehen sei,

– lediglich ganz oder teilweise nur mit Unterwäsche bekleidet

– vor/ während oder im Anschluss an den Geschlechtsverkehr, abgebildet ist,

vollständig zu löschen.

Zur Begründung hat es ausgeführt, der Klägerin stehe ein Anspruch auf Löschung im bezeichneten Umfang gemäß §§ 823, 1004 BGB in Verbindung mit ihrem allgemeinen Persönlichkeits­recht zu. Da die Aufnahmen im Einverständnis der Klägerin erstellt worden seien, liege zunächst kein rechtswidriger Eingriff in das das Recht am eigenen Bild umfassende allgemeine Persönlichkeitsrecht der Klägerin vor. Denn die Einwilligung zur Herstellung von Bildnissen habe zugleich – unter persönlichkeitsrechtlichen Gesichtspunkten – die Einwilligung zum Inhalt, dass ein anderer die erlaubterweise hergestellten Bildnisse in Besitz haben und über sie verfügen dürfe.

Die Klägerin sei aufgrund ihres allgemeinen Persönlichkeits­rechts allerdings berechtigt, die Einwilligung in die Herstellung der Bildnisse, ähnlich wie eine Einwilligung in die Veröffentlichung von Lichtbildern, zu widerrufen, nämlich dann, wenn die Fortgeltung der einmal erteilten Einwilligung in Widerspruch trete zu den vom Persönlich­keitsrecht geschützten Belangen des Abgebildeten. Der Widerruf der Einwilligung in die Anfertigung eines Lichtbildes könne den Akt der Bildniserstellung zwar nicht rückwirkend rechtswidrig machen. Allerdings habe er die Wirkung, dass – unter dem Blickwinkel des Persönlichkeitsrechts – nun­mehr die Befugnis des Adressaten entfalle, über das Bildnis und den darin verkörperten Aspekt der Persönlichkeit des Abgebildeten zu verfügen.

Im Streitfall sei es erforderlich, der Klägerin ein Widerrufsrecht jedenfalls hinsichtlich der Lichtbilder und Film­aufnahmen zu gewähren, die sie in intimen Situationen zeigten. Diese Aufnahmen be­träfen den Kernbereich des Persönlichkeitsrechts, für den ein besonderer Schutz notwendig sei. Dies gelte insbesondere im Hinblick darauf, dass die Fotos und Filme geeignet seien, das Ansehen der Klägerin gegenüber Dritten in erheblicher Weise zu beeinträchtigen. Zwar solle dem Beklagten nicht unterstellt werden, dass er beabsichtige, die Aufnahmen dritten Personen zugänglich zu machen und insoweit sei auch durch das Teilanerkenntnisur­teil klargestellt, dass er die Fotos und Filme ohne Einwilligung der Klägerin Dritten nicht zugänglich machen dürfe. Gleichwohl folge al­lein aus der Existenz dieser Fotos und Filme die keineswegs auszu­schließende Möglichkeit, dass die Aufnahmen auch ohne Zutun des Beklagten, z.B. durch Entwendung von Rechner oder Speichermedien, in die Hände unbefugter Dritter gelangen und so auch unter von dem Beklagten nicht gewollten Umständen ihren Weg in die Öffentlichkeit finden könnten.

Dies spreche dafür, der Klägerin die Befugnis einzuräumen, nach Beendigung der Bezie­hung über das Schicksal der sie in intimen Situationen zeigenden Aufnahmen  zu ent­scheiden. Wollte man ihr unter diesen Umständen die Möglichkeit eines Widerrufes abschneiden, würde dies bedeuten, dass sie fortan darauf angewiesen sei, darauf zu vertrauen, dass der Beklagte die Fotos so sorg­sam verwahre, dass ein Zugriff für Dritte ausgeschlossen sei. Man würde ihr damit jegliche Möglichkeit nehmen, über die Ver­wahrung oder die Vernichtung der Aufnahmen zu entscheiden. Dies sei der Klägerin jedenfalls bei den intimen Aufnahmen nicht zuzumuten.

Aus der maßgeblichen Sicht der Klägerin bestehe durchaus Anlass daran zu zweifeln, dass der Beklagte die Fotos so sorgfältig wie möglich verwahren werde. Auch wenn der Beklagte wiederholt geäußert habe, dass er die Fotos nicht veröffentlichen werde, könne nicht unbe­rücksichtigt bleiben, dass er vertrauliche E-Mails der Klägerin mit intimem Inhalt an die Firmenadresse des Ehemann mit der Möglichkeit der Kenntnisnahme durch unbeteiligte Dritte weitergeleitet habe. Selbst wenn es dem Beklagten darum gegangen sein sollte, gegenüber dem Ehemann etwaige Behauptungen zu den näheren Umständen der Beziehung klarzustellen und er tatsächlich nicht gewollt habe, dass dritte Personen Kenntnis erlangen, komme durch sein Verhalten, zu deren Unterbindung eine einstweilige Verfügung notwendig gewesen sei, in objektiver Hinsicht eine gewisse Sorglosigkeit im Umgang mit persönlichen und intimen Daten der Klägerin zum Ausdruck Dies begründe die Besorgnis, dass der Beklagte auch bei der Aufbewahrung der Fo­tos und Filme – wenn auch nur ungewollt – nicht die erforderliche Sorgfalt walten lasse.

Schließlich sei zu würdigen, dass sich die Umstände, unter denen die Klägerin ihr Einver­ständnis mit den Aufnahmen erteilt habe, maßgeblich geändert hätten. Zum Zeitpunkt der Erstel­lung der Aufnahmen habe zwischen den Parteien eine Beziehung bestanden, welche ersichtlich Grundlage für die Herstellung auch intimer Foto- und Filmaufnahmen gewesen sei. Diese gemeinsame Basis sei jedoch durch die zwischenzeitliche streitige Trennung der Parteien nicht mehr vorhanden.

Diesem Ergebnis stünden überwiegende Interessen des Beklagten nicht entgegen. Die Fo­to- und Filmaufnahmen seien innerhalb der Beziehung der Parteien entstanden. Vertragliche Be­ziehungen bestünden insoweit nicht. Auch habe der Beklagte für die Erstellung der Bilder und Filme kein Entgelt zahlen müssen. Zudem sei die Grundlage für die Erstellung der Fotos und Filme zwi­schenzeitlich entfallen, weil die Beziehung beendet sei. Unter diesen Umständen sei auf Seiten des Beklagten zwar zu berücksichtigen, dass die Fotos für ihn einen künstlerischen Wert hätten und der Erinnerung an die gemeinsame Beziehung dienten. Gegenüber diesen Umständen überwiege jedoch das ebenfalls grundrechtlich abgesicherte allgemeine Persönlichkeitsrecht der Klägerin.

Der Löschungsanspruch bestehe aber nicht für Aufnahmen, die die Klägerin beklei­det in Alltags- und Urlaubssituationen zeigten. Diese Lichtbilder tangierten das Per­sönlichkeitsrecht der Klägerin in einem geringeren Maße und seien auch weniger geeignet, das Ansehen der Klägerin gegenüber Dritten zu beeinträchtigen. Hinsichtlich dieser Fotos erachte es das Gericht daher auch für die Klägerin als zumutbar, wenn diese im Besitz des Beklagten ver­blieben.

Gegen das Urteil richten sich die Berufungen beider Parteien.

Der Beklagte wendet sich gegen die teilweise erfolgte Verurteilung zur Löschung, während die Klägerin weiterhin die vollständige Löschung begehrt.

Der Beklagte trägt nunmehr vor,

die Klägerin habe keinen Anspruch auf Löschung von elektronischen Vervielfältigungsstücken von Lichtbildern und/oder Filmaufnahmen, da diese in seinem Eigentum stünden. Die von ihm erstellten Fotografien und Videofilme mit erotischem Inhalt seien auf Wunsch der Klägerin, die ihn geliebt habe, und mit deren Einverständnis gefertigt worden. Die Klägerin habe ihm zudem -unstreitig- eine Vielzahl selbst von ihr erstellter Fotos oder Videos übersandt, die sie unbekleidet zeigten (Anlagekonvolut B 3, GA 279 ff.). Er lege Wert darauf, dass er zu der Klägerin nicht nur ein sexuelles Verhältnis unterhalten, sondern eine Liebesbeziehung bestanden habe. Die Klägerin sei unstreitig nie zur Fortsetzung der Liebesbeziehung gedrängt worden. Er habe nie damit gedroht, die Fotografien zu veröffentlichen. Das Landgericht habe bei seiner Entscheidung die grundgesetzlich geschützten Begriffe des allgemeinen Persönlichkeitsrechts, der Kunstfreiheit und die Auswirkungen in die Einwilligung in Lichtbildaufnahmen und letztlich auch das Kunsturhebergesetz verkannt. Es stehe ihm aufgrund seines allgemeinen Persönlichkeitsrechts und aufgrund seines Berufs als Fotograf und des Rechts auf Kunstfreiheit zu, über die Fotografien und Videofilme zu verfügen. Da die Klägerin ihre Einwilligung zur Fertigung der Aufnahmen erteilt habe, sei sie nicht berechtigt, diese Einwilligung für die Zukunft zu widerrufen. Die Verurteilung zur Löschung der Lichtbilder stelle einen unzulässigen Eingriff in die Eigentumsgarantie dar. Es handele sich um eine enteignende Maßnahme. Das Landgericht lasse unberücksichtigt, dass der Urteilstenor auch Bilder umfasse, die die Klägerin selbst von sich erstellt und ihm geschenkt habe. Der auf Löschung gerichtete Antrag der Klägerin sei auch zu unbestimmt. Das Landgericht habe gegen § 308 Abs. 1 Satz 1 ZPO verstoßen, weil es der Klägerin etwas zugesprochen habe, was diese nicht beantragt habe. Zudem sei die Urteilsformel zu unbestimmt und daher nicht vollstreckungsfähig, insbesondere was die Formulierung „im Anschluss an den Geschlechtsverkehr“ anbelange.

Der Beklagte beantragt nunmehr

unter teilweiser Abänderung des angefochtenen Urteils die Klage hinsichtlich

des Löschungsantrages insgesamt abzuweisen,

Die Klägerin beantragt,

die Berufung des Beklagten zurückzuweisen

sowie mit ihrer Berufung,

unter teilweiser Abänderung des angefochtenen Urteils den Beklagten zu verurteilen,

die in seinem unmittelbaren oder mittelbaren Besitz befindlichen elektronischen Vervielfältigungsstücke von die Klägerin zeigenden Lichtbildern und/oder Filmaufnahmen vollständig zu löschen.

Die Klägerin trägt vor,

der Beklagte habe zwischenzeitlich weite Teile seiner Berufungserwiderung im Internet veröffentlicht und durch Veröffentlichung auf … multipliziert. Das Landgericht habe den Löschungsanspruch zu Unrecht teilweise abgewiesen. Es habe die Regelungen des Bundesdatenschutzgesetzes übersehen und das Recht auf informationelle Selbstbestimmung nicht ausreichend beachtet.

Im Übrigen wird auf die tatsächlichen Feststellungen in dem angegriffenen Urteil sowie die zwischen den Parteien gewechselten Schriftsätze Bezug genommen (§ 540 Abs. 1 ZPO).

II.

Die zulässigen Berufungen der Parteien sind unbegründet.

1. Berufung des Beklagten

Das Landgericht hat der Klägerin zu Recht einen Anspruch auf Löschung der sich im unmittelbaren oder mittelbaren Besitz des Beklagten befindlichen elektronischen Vervielfältigungsstücke im bezeichneten Umfang zugesprochen.

a) Die formellen Angriffe des Beklagten gegen das Urteil bleiben ohne Erfolg.

aa) Entgegen der Auffassung des Beklagten (BB 19, GA 270)  ist der Löschungsantrag im Sinne des § 253 Abs. 2 Nr. 2 ZPO hinreichend bestimmt. Es erschließt sich ohne weiteres, was die Klägerin verlangt. Die Klägerin hat beantragt, den Beklagten zu verurteilen, die in seinem unmittelbaren oder mittelbaren Besitz befindlichen elektronischen Vervielfältigungsstücke von die Klägerin zeigenden Lichtbildern und/oder Filmaufnahmen vollständig zu löschen. Der Klageantrag erfasst damit alle im Besitz des Beklagten befindlichen Medien, auf denen sich die beanstandeten Aufnahmen befinden.

bb) Die Berufung des Beklagten rügt auch ohne Erfolg, dass das Landgericht gegen   § 308 Abs. 1 Satz 1 ZPO verstoßen habe. Nach dieser Vorschrift ist das Gericht nicht befugt, einer Partei etwas zuzusprechen, was nicht beantragt ist. Gemeint sind damit unzulässige „Mehr-„ und „Aliud“-Entscheidungen. Zulässig ist es aber, wenn das Gericht weniger („minus“) zuspricht, als beantragt (Zöller-Vollkommer, ZPO, 30. Aufl., § 308 Rnr 2 f.  m. w. N.). So aber liegt der Fall hier. Das Landgericht ist hinter dem Löschungsantrag der Klägerin insoweit zurückgeblieben, als es den Löschungsanspruch auf intime Aufnahmen beschränkt hat.

cc) Der Beklagte verweist auch erfolglos auf eine fehlende Bestimmtheit und Vollstreckungsfähigkeit des Tenors, soweit das Landgericht ihn verurteilt hat, Aufnahmen zu löschen, die die Klägerin „im Anschluss an den Geschlechtsverkehr“ zeigen. Die vom Landgericht vorgenommene Eingrenzung ist objektiv hinreichend bestimmt und enthält damit auch einen vollstreckungsfähigen Inhalt. Gemeint sind Aufnahmen, die einen objektiven Bezug zum Geschlechtsverkehr erkennen lassen und damit erkennbar noch in einem Zusammenhang mit dem zuvor durchgeführten Geschlechtsverkehr stehen.

b) Ein  Anspruch der Klägerin auf Löschung dieser Aufnahmen ergibt sich allerdings nicht aus § 6 Abs. 1 Bundesdatenschutzgesetz (BDSG), weil das Gesetz im Streitfall nicht anwendbar ist. Gemäß § 1 BDSG besteht der Zweck des Bundesdatenschutzgesetzes darin, den Einzelnen davor zu schützen, dass er durch den Umgang mit seinen personenbezogenen Daten in seinen Persönlichkeitsrechten beeinträchtigt wird. Das allgemeine Persönlichkeitsrecht gewährt dem Einzelnen das Recht auf informationelle Selbstbestimmung, d.h. hier frei darüber zu entscheiden, was mit seinen personenbezogenen Daten erfolgt (BVerfG, Urteil vom 15.12.1983 – 1 BvR 209/83, 1 BvR 269/83, 1 BvR 362/83, 1 BvR 420/83, 1 BvR 440/83; BVerfGE 65, 1, 41 ff- – Volkszählungsgesetz). Durch die Aufnahmen der Klägerin ist dieses Recht auf informationelle Selbstbestimmung zweifelsfrei betroffen.

Nach § 1 Abs. 2 Nr. 3 BDSG gilt das Gesetz unter bestimmten Voraussetzungen auch für nicht öffentliche Stellen. Dazu zählen nach § 2 Abs. 4 BDSG auch natürliche Personen. Der Beklagte, der von Beruf Fotograf ist, handelte als nicht-öffentliche Stelle im Sinne von § 2 Abs. 4 BDSG. Mit den die Klägerin zeigenden Aufnahmen stehen auch personenbezogene Daten im Sinne des § 3 BDSG in Rede.

Es mag im Rahmen der Prüfung eines Anspruchs auf Löschung der Aufnahmen gemäß § 6 Abs. 1 BDSG offen bleiben, ob diesem Anspruch ein Recht des Beklagten auf Kunstfreiheit gemäß Art. 5 Abs. 3 GG oder ein Anspruch aus seinem Eigentumsrecht gemäß Art. 14 Abs. 1 GG entgegensteht, weil es sich bei einer Löschung der Fotos um einen enteignenden Eingriff im Sinne von Art. 14 Abs. 3 GG handeln könnte. Insoweit entfalten die Grundrechte für den Bereich des Zivilrechts eine mittelbare Drittwirkung (BVerfGE 7, 198 ff. = NJW 1958, 257 – Lüth-Urteil; Maunz/Dürig/Her-zog-di Fabio, Kommentar, Stand 2001, Art. 2 Rn. 193).

Denn das BDSG ist im Streitfall, der einen rein privaten Sachverhalt betrifft, nicht anwendbar. Dies folgt aus § 1 Abs. 2 Nr. 3 BDSG und § 27 BDSG, wonach das BDSG nicht einschlägig ist bei Daten „ausschließlich für persönliche oder familiäre Tätigkeiten“. Dies ist vorliegend der Fall, da die Aufnahmen unstreitig nicht zur Veröffentlichung und Verbreitung bestimmt sind.

Entgegen der Auffassung der Klägerin werden die Daten auch nicht dadurch öffentlich, dass der Beklagte sich auf die Kunstfreiheit beruft und Kunst „auf kommunikative Sinnvermittlung nach außen gerichtet ist“. Insoweit geht der Senat mit dem Beklagten davon aus, dass er als Fotojournalist den von ihm gemachten Aufnahmen zwar einen künstlerischen Stellenwert beimisst, die Aufnahmen aber ausschließlich zu persönlichen bzw. privaten Zwecken gefertigt wurden und nicht für Dritte vorgesehen sind.

c) Ein Anspruch der Klägerin auf Löschung folgt auch nicht aus § 37 KunstUrhG. Danach unterliegen die widerrechtlich hergestellten, verbreiteten oder vorgeführten Exemplare und die zur widerrechtlichen Vervielfältigung oder Vorführung ausschließlich bestimmten Vorrichtungen der Vernichtung.

Die hier in Rede stehenden Lichtbilder und Vervielfältigungsstücke sind nicht widerrechtlich hergestellt worden, da die Klägerin mit der Erstellung der Lichtbilder durch den Beklagten einverstanden war und darüber hinaus diesem von ihr selbst gefertigte Aufnahmen mit intimen Charakter zur Verfügung gestellt hat.

d) Das Landgericht hat jedoch zu Recht einen Anspruch auf Löschung aus §§ 823 Abs. 1, 1004 BGB (analog) hergeleitet.

Zutreffend führt das Landgericht aus, dass die im Streit stehenden Aufnahmen mit Einverständnis der Klägerin erstellt worden sind. Die Erstellung der Lichtbilder und Filmaufnahmen sowie der damit einhergehende Besitz des Beklagten stellten damit zunächst keinen rechtswidrigen Eingriff in das allgemeine Persönlichkeitsrecht der Klägerin, das auch das Recht am eigenen Bild umfasst, dar. Die Einwilligung zur Herstellung von Bildnissen hat zugleich die Einwilligung zum Inhalt, dass ein anderer die Bildnisse des Betroffenen in Besitz hat und über sie verfügt (LG Oldenburg, Beschluss vom 24.04.1988 – 5 S 1656/87 – GRUR 1988, 694).

Entgegen der Auffassung des Beklagten schließt die Einwilligung der Klägerin in die Anfertigung der betreffenden Aufnahmen den Widerruf des Einverständnisses für die Zukunft aber nicht aus.

Ob ein Widerruf einer einmal erteilten Einwilligung für die Zukunft möglich ist, ist umstritten (vgl. Helle, Die Einwilligung beim Recht am eigenen Bild, AfP 1985, 93, 99 f.). Die ältere Rechtsprechung (OLG Freiburg, Urteil vom 11.06.1953 – 2 U 52/53 – GRUR 1953 404, 405; vgl. auch Helle, aaO, 100) hat die Widerrufsmöglichkeit, auch unter veränderten Umständen, verneint. Teilweise wird die Auffassung vertreten, dass ein Widerruf einer Einwilligung einer Medienveröffentlichung nur zulässig sei, wenn sich seit der Einwilligung die Umstände so gravierend verändert hätten, dass eine weitere Veröffentlichung das allgemeine Persönlichkeitsrecht des Betroffenen verletzen würde (Frömming, Die Einwilligung im Medienrecht, NJW 1996, 958 unter Bezug auf OLG München, AfP 1987, 570, 571 und Soehring, Presserecht, 2. Auflage 1995, Rn. 19, 49). Dies wird aus einer analogen Anwendung des § 42 Abs. UrhG hergeleitet, wonach der Urheber bei „gewandelter Überzeugung“ Nutzungsrechte gegenüber dem Inhaber widerrufen könne, wenn das Werk seiner Überzeugung nach nicht mehr entspreche und deshalb ihm die Verwertung nicht mehr zugemutet werden könne. Dieselbe Situation wird bei einer Einwilligung in die Medienveröffentlichung angenommen, wenn sich die innere Einstellung des Betroffenen grundlegend gewandelt habe. Auch dann sei eine weitere Publizierung nicht mehr zumutbar (Frömming, ebd.).

Dabei ist die Rechtsnatur der Einwilligung nicht unumstritten. Während der Bundesgerichtshof (Urteil vom 18.03.1980 – VI ZR 1557/78 – NJW 1980, 1903 f.) in einer älteren Entscheidung die Einwilligung wohl noch als Realakt angesehen hat, wobei für die Auslegung der Erklärung die Grundsätze der rechtsgeschäftlichen Erklärungen angewendet werden sollen, ist die jüngere Rechtsprechung der Auffassung, dass die Einwilligung grundsätzlich eine einseitige, empfangsbedürftige Willenserklärung sei. Ein Widerruf könne nur dann erfolgen, wenn die Bedeutung des Persönlichkeitsrechts dies gebiete, wie z. B. Vorliegen veränderter Umstände, die auf einer gewandelten inneren Einstellung beruhen, so dass dem Betroffenen nicht mehr zumutbar sei, an der einmal abgegebenen Einwilligung festgehalten zu werden (LG Düsseldorf, Urteil vom 27.10.2010 – 12 O 309/10 – ZUM-RD 2011, 247 ff., Juris Rn. 23).

Der Senat folgt der zuletzt genannten Auffassung, weil nur dadurch dem allgemeinen Persönlichkeitsrecht, das auch das Recht am eigenen Bild umfasst, Geltung verliehen werden kann.

Die Bindungswirkung an eine einmal erteilte Einwilligung kann in Widerspruch zu den von dem allgemeinen Persönlichkeitsrecht geschützten Belangen des Abgebildeten stehen, so dass dem allgemeinen Persönlichkeitsrecht Vorrang vor dem Umstand zu gewähren ist, dass der Betroffene der Anfertigung der Lichtbilder zu irgendeinem Zeitpunkt zugestimmt hat.

Im Streitfall ist zu berücksichtigen, dass die Bild- und Filmaufnahmen im privaten Bereich im Rahmen einer Liebesbeziehung  gefertigt worden sind. Sie stehen in keinem Zusammenhang mit der beruflichen Tätigkeit des Beklagten, wie es z.B. bei Aufnahmen eines Modells gegen Entgelt der Fall wäre. Es handelt sich um intime, den Kernbereich des Persönlichkeitsrechts betreffende Aufnahmen.

Insoweit ist der Schutzbereich der Berufsausübungsfreiheit des Beklagten nach Art. 12 Abs. 1 GG nicht berührt. Im Raum steht das Recht des Beklagten auf Eigentum gemäß Art. 14 Abs. 1 GGG, das Recht auf Kunstfreiheit gemäß Art. 5 Abs. 3 GG und das Recht auf allgemeine Handlungsfreiheit nach Art. 2 Abs. 1 GG. Der Beklagte hat hervorgehoben, dass für ihn auch der künstlerische Wert der Aufnahmen im Vordergrund stehe.

Die Gewährleistung der Kunstfreiheit erfasst sowohl den Bereich der künstlerischen Betätigung, den Werkbereich, als auch die Darbietung und Verbreitung des Kunstwerks, also den Wirkbereich des künstlerischen Schaffens (BVerfG, Urteil vom 22.08.2006 – 1 BvR 1168/04 –BVerfGE  30, 173, 189; BVerfG, Urteil vom  17.07.1984 – 1 BvR 816/82 – BVerfGE 67, 213, 224 – anachronistischer Zug). Betroffen ist hier allein der Wirkbereich des Beklagten. Da der Beklagte aber anerkannt hat und durch Teilanerkenntnis verurteilt worden ist, die Lichtbilder und/oder Filmaufnahmen nicht ohne Einwilligung der Klägerin Dritten zugänglich zu machen, beschränkt sich sein Anliegen allein darauf, sich selbst die Aufnahmen anschauen zu können. Da für die Ausübung der Kunstfreiheit neben dem Schutz des Werkbereichs aber auch der Schutz des Wirkbereichs von erheblicher Bedeutung ist, eine Einschränkung derselben von dem Beklagten aber hingenommen wird, fällt im Rahmen der Abwägung zwischen den schutzwürdigen Belangen des Schutzes des Persönlichkeitsrechts der Klägerin einerseits und des Rechts auf Kunstfreiheit des Beklagten andererseits letzteres Recht nicht mehr erheblich ins Gewicht. Die Kunstfreiheit besteht entgegen dem Wortlaut des Art. 5 Abs. 3 GG auch nicht schrankenlos. Sie muss im Sinne einer effektiven Grundrechtsausübung im Einzelfall hinter anderen Grundrechten zurückstehen (Bülow, Persönlichkeitsrechtsverletzungen durch künstlerische Werke, 2013, S. 42 f.).

Entsprechendes gilt für das Grundrecht aus Art. 14 Abs. 1 GG und das Grundecht auf allgemeine Handlungsfreiheit gemäß Art. 2 Abs. 1 GG.

Ist die Beziehung zwischen den Parteien beendet, ist das aus dem allgemeinen Persönlichkeitsrecht abzuleitende Interesse der Klägerin an der Löschung der Aufnahmen höher zu bewerten als das auf seinem Eigentumsrecht begründete Recht des Beklagten an der Existenz der Aufnahmen, die nach seinen eigenen Bekundungen nur ideellen Wert haben kann, da eine Zurschaustellung der Bilder oder eine Veröffentlichung dieser von ihm nach eigenem Bekunden nicht beabsichtigt ist.

Soweit der Beklagte in der mündlichen Verhandlung vor dem Senat dargelegt hat, dass die Foto- und Filmaufnahmen durch ein Sicherungsprogramm vor dem Zugriff Dritter gesichert seien, hat der Senat erhebliche Zweifel, ob nicht zukünftig durch veränderte Techniken Dritten die Möglichkeit eröffnet wird, eine solches Sicherungsprogramm zu „knacken“. Der Beklagte hat auch auf wiederholte Nachfrage nicht konkret, nachvollziehbar und überzeugend anzugeben vermocht, wie er die Vervielfältigungsstücke dauerhaft und umfassend gegen einen unbefugten Zugriff Dritter geschützt haben will.

Der Senat teilt im Übrigen die Auffassung des Landgerichts, dass aus der maßgeblichen Sicht der Klägerin durchaus Anlass zu Zweifeln besteht, ob der Beklagte mit den Aufnahmen mit der gebotenen größtmöglichen Sorgfalt umgeht. Zu Recht weist das Landgericht darauf hin, dass der Beklagte vertrauliche E-Mails der Klägerin mit intimem Inhalt an die Firmenadresse des Ehemanns mit der Möglichkeit der Kenntnisnahme durch unbeteiligte Dritte weitergeleitet hat. Darüber hinaus hat der Beklagte in der Folgezeit seine E-Mails von verschiedenen Adressen aus abgesendet, um so sicherzustellen, dass diese nicht von vorneherein aussortiert werden. Immerhin war der Erlass einer einstweiligen Verfügung des Amtsgerichts Frankfurt notwendig, um dieses Verhalten zu unterbinden.

Nach Auffassung des Senats ist die Einwilligung in die Erstellung und die damit verbundene Nutzung der in Rede stehenden Lichtbilder zudem zeitlich auf die Dauer der zwischen den Parteien bestehenden Beziehung beschränkt. Es handelte sich um eine zweckbestimmte Einwilligung.

2. Berufung der Klägerin

Das Landgericht hat die Klage zu Recht abgewiesen, soweit die Klägerin die vollständige Löschung der sie zeigenden Aufnahmen begehrt.

Im Rahmen der Prüfung des Anspruchs auf Löschung gemäß §§ 823 Abs. 1, 1004 BGB analog, ist zu berücksichtigen, dass unter Beachtung des Grundsatzes der mittelbaren Drittwirkung der Grundrechte das allgemeine Persönlichkeitsrecht und der Umstand der Einwilligung in die Anfertigung einerseits in Abwägung zu bringen sind mit dem Eigentumsrecht des Beklagten an den Lichtbildern und elektronischen Vervielfältigungsstücken sowie dem Recht auf Kunstfreiheit andererseits.

Das Landgericht hebt zu Recht hervor, dass Lichtbilder, die die Klägerin in bekleidetem Zustand in Alltags- oder Urlaubssituationen zeigen, das allgemeine Persönlichkeitsrecht in einem geringeren Maße tangieren und weniger geeignet sind, das Ansehen der Klägerin gegenüber Dritten zu beeinträchtigen. Es ist allgemein üblich, dass bei etwa bei Feiern, Festen und in Urlauben Fotos von Personen in deren Einverständnis gemacht werden und mit diesem Einverständnis zugleich das Recht eingeräumt wird, diese Fotos auf Dauer besitzen und nutzen zu dürfen.

Soweit die Berufung der Klägerin unter Bezugnahme auf die Kommentierung von di Fabio (Maunz/Dürig/Herzog, di Fabio, aaO), die Entscheidungen des Bundesverfassungsgerichts (Urteil vom 15.12.1999 -1 BvR 653/96 – BVerfGE 101, 361 ff. = NJW 2000, 1021 f.- Caroline von Monaco-Entscheidung) und die Entscheidungen des Bundesgerichtshofs (Urteile vom 25.04.1995 -VI ZR 272/94 – NJW 1995, 1955 ff.) und vom 24.05.2013 V ZR 220/12 – NJW 2013, 3089 ff.) argumentiert, dass der Klägerin aus dem Recht am eigenen Bild  und dem Recht auf informationelle Selbstbestimmung ein Recht auf vollständige Löschung aller angefertigten Lichtbilder und elektronischen Vervielfältigungen habe, auch soweit diese die Klägerin in unbekleidetem Zustand zeigten, ist zu bemerken, dass diese Entscheidungen einen nicht vergleichbaren Sachverhalt aufwiesen. Die Entscheidungen des Bundesgerichtshofs betrafen Videoaufnahmen auf einem öffentlichen Weg bzw. die Videoüberwachung in einer Wohnungseigentumsanlage. Bei der zitierten Entscheidung des Bundesverfassungsgesichts ging es um die Aussage, dass das allgemeine Persönlichkeitsrecht nicht auf den häuslichen Bereich beschränkt ist und der Einzelne grundsätzlich auch die Möglichkeit haben muss, an anderen, erkennbar abgeschiedenen Orten von einer Bildberichterstattung unbehelligt zu bleiben.

Im vorliegenden Fall stellt sich die Situation aber so dar, dass die Klägerin nicht ohne ihre Wissen von der Aufnahme der Lichtbilder überrascht worden ist, sondern im Rahmen ihrer Beziehung zu dem Beklagten in die Aufnahmen und die anschließende Nutzung durch den Beklagten eingewilligt hat.

Der Senat ist mit dem Landgericht der Auffassung, dass das Persönlichkeitsrecht der Klägerin in Bezug auf Aufnahmen, die sie in Alltagssituationen zeigen, nicht nur in einem geringeren Umfang betroffen ist, sondern sich die Klägerin auch an der einmal erteilten Einwilligung zur Erstellung der Fotos und der  Nutzung durch den Beklagten festhalten lassen muss. Der Beklagte hat mit Schriftsatz vom 21.03.2014 (GA 341, 364) als Anlage B 6 eine Werbebroschüre des Autohauses vorgelegt, in der die Klägerin selbst abgebildet ist. Diese Aufnahmen, die ebenfalls von dem Beklagten gefertigt worden sind, belegen, dass die Klägerin keine Bedenken hat, vom Beklagten angefertigte Lichtbilder der Öffentlichkeit preiszugeben, wenn es ihren Interessen oder der ihres Ehemannes bzw. Familie dient.

Der Hinweis der Klägerin (Berufungserwiderung, S. 4, GA 334; Schriftsatz vom 24.06.2013, S. 9. GA 127) auf die Entscheidung des Landgerichts Aschaffenburg (Urteil vom 31.10.2011 – 14 O 21/11 – NJW 2012, 287), wonach die Herstellung, Verschaffung oder der Besitz eines Bildnisses ohne Einwilligung des Abgebildeten auch dann eine Verletzung des allgemeinen Persönlichkeitsrechts darstelle, wenn keine Verbreitungsabsicht bestehe, verfängt nicht. Dort ging es darum, dass von einer Patientin während einer Brustoperation von deren professionellen Betreuer mittels einer Handykamera ohne deren Einwilligung Fotos gemacht wurden. Der vorliegende Fall liegt ersichtlich anders.

Der Klägerin steht ein weitergehender Löschungsanspruch auch nicht nach dem BDSG zu, da dieses im Streitfall nicht anwendbar ist, wie sich aus dem unter II. 1.b) Gesagten ergibt.

III.

Der Senat lässt die Revision gemäß § 543 Abs. 2 Nr. 2 ZPO zur Fortbildung des Rechts zu. Soweit ersichtlich, ist die Frage, ob und unter welchen Voraussetzungen ein Anspruch auf Löschung von Vervielfältigungsstücken außerhalb des Anwendungsbereichs des § 37 KunstUrhG oder des einen Anspruch auf Vernichtung von Vervielfältigungsstücken ausdrücklich vorsehenden § 98 Abs. 1 UrhG besteht, höchstrichterlich noch nicht geklärt.

IV.

Die Kostenentscheidung beruht auf §§ 92 Abs. 1, 97 Abs. 1 ZPO, die Entscheidung über die vorläufige Vollstreckbarkeit folgt aus §§  708 Nr. 10, 713 ZPO.

Der Streitwert für das Berufungsverfahren wird auf 6.000,00 € festgesetzt (Berufung Klägerin 3.000,00 €; Berufung Beklagter 3.000,00 €).

http://europe-v-facebook.org/EN/en.html

Class Action against Facebook Ireland

Aim. The aim of the lawsuit is to make Facebook finally operate lawfully in the area of data protection.

Plaintiff. The primary plaintiff is a consumer and privacy law expert (Max Schrems). All other Facebook users are asked to join the case as part of an ‘Austrian style class action’. This will occur in the next few months through ‘assignments’ of claims of other Facebook users from all over the world to the primary claimant. Unlike in a US class action, participants must therefore actively come forward, but can be joined at any time. The necessary assignment can be carried out within a few minutes at www.fbclaim.com through a specially developed ‘assignment app’ for computers and smart phones. All adult non-commercial Facebook users outside Canada and the USA can take part.

Violations. The suit is essentially based on the following unlawful acts of Facebook Ireland:

  • Data use policy which is invalid under EU law
  • The absence of effective consent to many types of data use
  • Support of the NSA’s ‘PRISM’ surveillance programme
  • Tracking of Internet users on external websites (e.g. through ‘Like buttons’)
  • Monitoring and analysis of users through ‘big data’ systems
  • Unlawful introduction of ‘Graph Search’
  • Unauthorised passing on of user data to external applications

Hybrid. While European data protection law applies, the claims for damages in accordance with Facebook’s conditions of use will have to be assessed under Californian law. In the case of Facebook Ireland, both European data protection law and US tort law are applicable.

Damages. The claim for damages has been deliberately set low, at a token €500 per user. We are only claiming a small amount, as our primary objective is to ensure correct data protection. However, if many thousands of people participate we would reach an amount that will have a serious impact on Facebook.

Costs. The lawsuit is organized and run without consideration. There is no risk of costs for participants of the class action, as only Schrems will figure as a claimant. The suit is being financed entirely by ROLAND ProzessFinanz AG. If it is successful, ROLAND will receive 20% as legal funding provider.

sk FAQ_ENG

England & Wales: MCGrath vs Dawkins, [2012] EWHC B3 (QB), 30-3-2012

BAILII [Home] [Databases] [World Law] [Multidatabase Search] [Help] [Feedback]

England and Wales High Court (Queen’s Bench Division) Decisions


You are here: BAILII >> Databases >> England and Wales High Court (Queen’s Bench Division) Decisions >> McGrath & Anor v Dawkins & Ors (Rev 1) [2012] EWHC B3 (QB) (30 March 2012)
URL: http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWHC/QB/2012/B3.html
Cite as: [2012] EWHC B3 (QB)


[New search] [Printable RTF version] [Help]


 

 

Neutral Citation Number: [2012] EWHC B3 (QB)
Case No: IHJ/11/0537

IN THE HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE
QUEEN’S BENCH DIVISION

Royal Courts of Justice
Strand, London, WC2A 2LL
30th March 2012

B e f o r e :

HHJ MOLONEY QC
(sitting as a Judge of the High Court)

____________________

Between:

1. CHRISTOPHER ANTHONY MCGRATH
2. MCG PRODUCTIONS LIMITED

Claimants
– and –
 
1. PROFESSOR RICHARD DAWKINS
2. THE RICHARD DAWKINS FOUNDATION FOR REASON AND SCIENCE
3. AMAZON EU SARL (trading as Amazon.co.uk)
4. VAUGHAN JOHN JONES

Defendants

____________________

The First Claimant in person and on behalf of the Second Claimant
William McCormick QC and Robert Dougans (solicitor advocate) (instructed by Bryan Cave) for the First and Second Defendants
Richard Munden (instructed by Field Fisher Waterhouse LLP) for the Third Defendant
Jonathan Price (instructed by Bryan Cave) for the Fourth Defendant

Hearing dates: 10 and 11 November 2011 
____________________

HTML VERSION OF JUDGMENT
____________________

Crown Copyright ©

INTRODUCTION AND CHRONOLOGY

    1. This judgment relates to a series of interim applications made by the several Defendants to an internet libel action brought by the 1st Claimant Mr McGrath (C) and his company (MCG). (Except where a distinction needs to be drawn, any references below to C should be taken as covering his company too.) What follows is a summary of the agreed or otherwise indisputable facts which form the background to the issues arising under the applications.

 

 

    1. C is the author of a book entitled “The Attempted Murder of God: Hidden Science You Really Need To Know”, which was published by MCG in 2010 under the pen-name “Scrooby”. None of the parties referred me to the book itself or any part of it in evidence during this hearing, but it purports to be a contribution to the current debate on “religion versus science”, whose purpose is to argue that modern science, properly understood, does not refute the existence of God but proves it.

 

(I say “purports” because C’s case is that the book is not to be taken at face value but is intended as a satirical parody of various aspects of modern life such as conspiracy theories and deception. In view of this assertion it would not be appropriate at this stage of the proceedings for the Court to assume that C’s own intellectual position is necessarily the same in all respects as the book’s. He has pleaded that he is a Roman Catholic by upbringing, though non-practising, a believer in God, but not a “Creationist” at least in the narrow sense of that term; he accepts evolutionary biology as an indisputable fact, but is not certain as to the truth or otherwise of the account of creation in Genesis. See his Part 18 Response dated 25 July 2011.)

 

    1. Also published in 2010 was another book on the same general topic, but taking the opposite side, “The Grand Design: New Answers to the Ultimate Questions of Life” by the very well-known scientist Professor Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow. Like most books nowadays, both were available for purchase through the Amazon UK website run by the 3rdDefendant. That website is of course primarily a commercial vehicle, written and presented by the 3rd Defendant itself for marketing books and other products. However, it also includes an online public-access facility, through which any member of the public may publish their own review of a book for sale on the site, and others may post comments on that review, or on previous comments, so creating a “thread” which may be read by any internet user worldwide.

 

 

    1. Obviously Prof. Hawking’s book was likely to attract far more interest among readers than C’s, but at least some of those readers might also be interested in C’s book if it came to their attention. C therefore decided to adopt a marketing tactic which some might consider questionable but which he says is not unusual on the internet. On 9 September 2010 he posted a purported review of the Hawking book, signed by “Scrooby”, which began by giving the details of C’s own book, and then went on to claim that C’s book “answered all doubts raised in [Hawking’s] book” and was an “antidote to this misguided book”.

 

 

    1. Not surprisingly this “review” generated a long thread of comments (Thread C), many critical of “Scrooby” for trying to take advantage of Prof Hawking’s established reputation to sell his own book. C participated fully in this thread, using several identities: those of Scrooby and of MCG as was proper, but also those of “Reviewer” and “C. Sheridan” who purported to be third party contributors. In total, of the 60 comments on the thread, 19 were from C in one persona or another, including the two last and longest which were posted by him on 13 September 2010.

 

 

    1. The most active and hostile of the other participants in this thread was the 4th Defendant, Mr Jones, who describes himself as a person with an interest in public affairs who writes on scepticism, religious encroachment on public life, civic religious matters and educational topics such as enforced collective worship. In the science/religion debate, he is unequivocally in the camp of the scientific atheists. The great majority of the words complained of in this action were written by him, in the form of postings on the Amazon website (mostly Thread C, but also on some other threads generated by other reviews) and on the Dawkins website referred to below. Some of the words complained of on the Dawkins website were written (in response to Mr Jones) by other contributors, who are not sued personally.

 

 

    1. I shall consider the various words complained of in detail later on. For present purposes it is sufficient to say that in addition to expressing his own opinions on the topic, and his criticisms of Scrooby’s views (of which in general C does not complain), Mr Jones went further in two main respects: by investigating and “exposing” C personally as the real author of the book, and criticising him and his company with such words as “fraud” and “phony”; and by characterising C as a “creationist”, to which C strongly objects for reasons to be considered below in relation to defamatory meaning. (Mr Jones caused C particular and understandable distress by naming C’s two young children in a pejorative context, which he now accepts he should not have done.) Many of C’s contributions to Thread C were in reply to Mr Jones’s contributions, and vice versa.

 

 

    1. As stated, this heated debate between C and Mr Jones on Amazon took place between 9 and 13 September 2010. On 12 September 2010, Mr Jones opened a second front by commencing a thread on the website richarddawkins.net. The background here differs in important respects from that of the Amazon website.

 

 

    1. Professor Richard Dawkins (the 1st Defendant) is of course a very well-known scientist whose main professional field is biological evolution. In addition he is not merely a scientific atheist but also (which does not always follow) an active opponent of traditional revealed religion, which he views as positively false and as harmful in various respects. In a 2006 web article put in evidence by C (Bundle1/tab2/page 43) Prof Dawkins stated his manifesto:

 

“I am one of those scientists who feel that it is no longer enough just to get on and do science. We have to devote a significant proportion of our time and resources to defending it from deliberate attack from organised ignorance” [in context a plain reference to Judaeo-Christian religion]. “We even have to go out on the attack ourselves for the sake of reason and sanity. But it must be a positive attack, for science and reason have so much to give…My Trustees and I have set up the Richard Dawkins Foundation for Reason and Science. It is actually two sister foundations of the same name, one legally constituted in Britain and the other legally incorporated in the United States.”

 

    1. The website richarddawkins.net bears the heading of the Richard Dawkins Foundation for Reason and Science and includes an online discussion forum, largely it would appear for people like Mr Jones who share the views and aims proclaimed by Prof. Dawkins. There is a live issue considered below as to whether that website is operated by the 2nd Defendant, which is a UK company, or by its similarly-named USA sister, which has not been sued. Whichever corporation is responsible for it, the website’s rule is that no new thread can be opened on the forum without the originating posting first being read and approved for publication by one of its four moderators, who included Prof. Dawkins. Once the thread has been opened in this way, the moderators play no further part, and any later responses will be published without their intervention or approval.

 

 

    1. Mr Jones submitted an originating article entitled “Dare to criticise a creationist? Be prepared to be sued…” in which he gave his version of his ongoing exchange with C/Scrooby on the Amazon website. This was approved by one of the moderators (there is an issue as to which) on Sunday 12 September 2010. There followed over the next four days until 16 September 2010 a thread of some 40 comments in response to Mr Jones’s original entry, including his own further contributions.

 

 

 

    1. The Dawkins thread differs from the Amazon ones in several material respects, reflecting perhaps the different characteristics of the two websites:

 

a. C made no contributions to it.

b. Nor did any other supporters of C or opponents of Mr Jones.

c. It was thus not so much a debate as a conversation between friends, agreeing broadly with Mr Jones and advising him on how best to deal with C.

d. Perhaps as a result, when C came to select the passages from the Dawkins website on which he wished to sue, he did not confine himself to Mr Jones’s words but also included those of others, a point that should be borne in mind when considering the extent of Mr Jones’s personal liability for matter published on the Dawkins website.

 

    1. From an early stage, C protested in the course of the Amazon debate that Mr Jones had gone too far, and threatened legal action; indeed, it was these threats that led Mr Jones to open the Dawkins thread, as the title of his opening contribution shows. The Dawkins thread was taken down on 19 September 2010 following complaint from C. The position in relation to the Amazon thread is more complicated, and will be considered in more detail below in relation to the statutory defences available to ISPs; but it is clear that C tried to have the threads taken down and that many items were removed by Amazon on 30 September 2010; others remained in place until proceedings were served in July 2011.

 

 

    1. On 1 April 2011 C issued his claim form. The original Particulars of Claim ran to some 61 pages (in fairness, the threads containing the words complained of are themselves long and complex) and at the Masters’ suggestion a more compact version running to some 15 pages was served on 4 July 2011. Unlike the other Defendants, Mr Jones has served a Defence (short and unparticularised), but essentially his position is the same as the other Defendants’, namely that the claim is fatally flawed in many respects and should be dismissed summarily. The Defendants have served a series of applications, all of which were listed before me for hearing together. C, who is in person, thus found himself facing a formidable body of opponents and arguments to which it was naturally difficult for him to respond orally. Fortunately he had anticipated this by preparing very lengthy but well-researched written submissions in answer, and it became clear early in the hearing that the fairest course was for me to reserve judgment and consider those submissions alongside the oral and written submissions advanced by counsel.

 

 

    1. The applications before me fall into several different categories, which I shall deal with in the following order:

 

 

a. Responsibility for Publication. Mr Jones is of course the author of most of the words complained of and does not dispute his responsibility for his words. The other Defendants, as website operators, do dispute their responsibility, Prof Dawkins and his UK Foundation on factual grounds, and Amazon on the basis of the statutory defences provided by s. 1 of the Defamation Act 1996 and reg. 19 Electronic Commerce Regulations 2002 (SI 2002/2013).

 

b. Defamatory Meaning. I am asked by each Defendant to rule on whether and to what extent the words complained of against them are capable of bearing the meanings attributed to them by the Particulars of Claim or any and if so what meaning defamatory of the Claimants or either of them.

 

c. Damage. Objection is taken on legal grounds to the pleaded claims for aggravated and exemplary damages, and more generally to the Claimants’ apparent attempt to bring in a wider claim for commercial losses from a separate business venture.

 

d. Abuse of Process. In summary I am asked to rule on whether so much of the claim as may survive the above objections is “a game worth the candle” in comparison with the cost and court time likely to be expended in determining it.

 

(In addition the Defendants object to various aspects of the manner in which the case is pleaded; but since C is a litigant in person I would normally give him the opportunity to put that right by amendment, unless the flaw was a fatal and incurable one.)

 

A. RESPONSIBILITY FOR PUBLICATION

    1. The 2nd Defendant. As stated, the 2nd Defendant, (the UK company), is incorporated in England, and has a “sister” corporation with a similar name (but for the word “Limited”) incorporated in the USA. The words complained of were published on the website richarddawkins.net, for which C says the UK company is responsible. The UK company’s case is principally set out in the Witness Statements of Prof. Dawkins and of Paula Kirby (who is a consultant manager/administrator for the UK company), and may be summarised as follows:

 

– The UK company bears no responsibility for that website or its contents, because the .net website is run by the US company. The UK company has a separate website,richarddawkinsfoundation.org, which has no open-access forum of its own. The reason for this distinction is specifically to protect the assets of the UK company from defamation liability for third-party web contributions. (The US company is of course potentially liable in the UK for its publications read here, but as is well known UK libel judgments are in effect unenforceable against assets in the USA for constitutional reasons.) Also for that reason, the USA website has a hyperlink to the UK website, but (I was assured) not vice versa.

On this basis, the UK company has applied for summary judgment, contending that it is clear now that the claim against it has no real prospect of success. The burden is on the 2ndDefendant to satisfy me of this, and I should refuse the application if the evidence it puts before me is not convincing, and/or if I consider that there is a real prospect that (following pleading, disclosure and trial) the Claimants may ultimately succeed on this issue.

 

    1. C’s case on this issue is set out very fully in his general written response dated 8 November 2011 (which repeats and consolidates arguments also made in his earlier submissions dated 17 and 30 September 2011, which I have also taken into account). He begins with four main points, the second and third of which are directly relevant to this particular application:

 

a. This case has been ruinous to him.

b. Mr Jones is a proven liar, and the fact that the other Defendants are willing to rely on his evidence casts doubt on their evidence too.

c. As a matter of fact, the .net website is run by the 1st and 2nd Defendants from England (for various reasons considered more fully below).

d. The 3rd Defendant Amazon has also failed to prove its case.

 

    1. I should first deal with the contention that Mr Jones is a proven liar, because it is a matter of great significance to Mr McGrath. He points in particular to Mr Jones’s claim in his evidence to the Court to have consulted C’s LinkedIn entry before commencing his campaign, and states that this must be false because he together with the Claimant company did not join LinkedIn until later. C also refers to other serious matters which if true might affect Mr Jones’s credibility, But:

 

a. These matters are disputed in various respects and the stage to determine them has not yet been reached.

b. Mr Jones’s credibility would be relevant, if the Court had to decide a disputed issue of fact which turned in whole or part on his evidence. As it happens, I do not think any such issue arises at this stage; but if it did, then on a summary judgment application I would have to assume that that dispute had been resolved in C’s favour, so it would not yet be necessary to assess Mr Jones’s credibility.

c. On the present issue of the 2nd Defendant’s responsibility, Mr Jones has no relevant evidence to give. C’s point is that the other Defendants’ reliance on him diminishes their own credibility in respect of other matters unconnected with Mr Jones. I am not very impressed with this point, the connection between Mr Jones and the other Defendants being a tenuous one, and their reliance on his disputed evidence of fact being very limited. But in any event, as above stated, if I found myself having to consider their credibility at this stage, I would be bound to assume the disputed matter in C’s favour.

It follows that I do not consider this question relevant to the present application.

 

    1. I turn now to C’s substantive objections to the 2nd Defendant’s case, which are relevant and important. He accepts that what he calls the “heavy machinery” of the .net website is located in the USA (i.e. the hosting servers and the ICANN registration) but contends:

 

 

a. that this is an artificial and unimportant distinction, and that in fact there is but one RDFRS charity, run by Professor Dawkins and his colleagues from England, and that responsibility for the websites is not fixed with one or the other company and can be switched from country to country to suit their convenience;

b. that one proof of this, or clue to the reality, is that the first posting on the website bears a UK time of 11.18 am (the time when the moderator approved it) – if this is an American website, why does it use UK time?

c. and that in her evidence Ms Kirby effectively admits liability by saying that the 2nd Defendant “wishes to ensure that it has prior sight of all material posted on the British Website to attempt to mitigate any such liability”.

d. He also contests the 1st and 2nd Defendants’ assertion that there is no hyperlink from the UK to the US website, but only the other way.

 

(In considering the applications, I remind myself that it is not, at this stage, for C to prove that his points are good; it is for the Defendants to prove that they are bound to fail, as being false or irrelevant, and that C has no real prospect of establishing at trial that the 1st and/or 2nd Defendants are answerable in law for any of the publications complained of.)

 

    1. In respect of point (a), artificiality, in a popular sense C is of course quite right, as Professor Dawkins’s manifesto quoted above itself suggests. It would be perfectly fair and understandable to speak broadly of a single Dawkins movement or school of thought, centring on him in England, and manifesting itself in, for example, the two websites. But for the purposes of tort litigation, every act complained of must be or be shown to be attributable to one or more legal persons, either natural (a human being) or artificial (some form of corporate body). And, so far as corporations are concerned, English law permits limited liability; that is, if an act is performed by a corporation, the shareholders or other human beings behind it are not thereby personally liable for that act (except that their investment is at risk), and the staff or management are liable only in respect of their direct personal participation in that act.

 

Put another way, in law the Dawkins movement, foundation or charity does not exist, and cannot act, except through one or both of its corporate vehicles (which in turn act through their human representatives); and it is incumbent on a claimant to establish that the particular vehicle he has sued is the one through which the tort was committed.

 

    1. At this point I should deal briefly with a related point taken by C. He refers to the established UK legal doctrine that an internet libel is treated as having been published where it is downloaded and read, so that for example the American publisher of an American website is subject to the English court’s libel jurisdiction insofar as people here access it. This is correct; but it does not mean that the English associates of that American publisher are also liable (unless of course they played a sufficient part in the particular publication complained of).

 

 

    1. A similar source of confusion lies in the common or overlapping management of the two companies. At the material time, Prof. Dawkins among others was a director of both companies, and an administrator of the .net website. On his own case, he discharged some of his functions in respect of the US company and charity from the UK by email and internet, most relevantly the moderating of the US website. C points to this as proof that the distinction between the US and the UK arms of the Foundation is an imaginary one.

 

But again, this is to misunderstand the doctrine of corporate personality. The same person may, and quite commonly does, own and operate two companies, perhaps in two different jurisdictions. Nowadays he may manage them actively by email and internet from almost anywhere in the world. But they remain distinct bodies, and provided the tortious act is clearly attributable to Company A and not Company B, B will not be liable even if the man who committed that act on A’s behalf (and may well be personally liable for it) is also the guiding mind of B.

 

    1. It follows that the time-zone question is not likely to be decisive, or even of great weight, in deciding if the .net website is owned or operated by the US company; if its management were largely UK-based, they might perfectly well choose to use UK time even on a US website. But in fact, the 2nd Defendant’s case is different. It is that the website has no specific time zone of its own; each posting is logged at the time of entry, but that time is displayed to any given reader in his own local time (e.g. a UK user posts at midday on 1 April, UK time; whenever a New York user looks at that posting, it will bear the time of 7am New York time, assuming his own computer uses that time). During the hearing, I gave the 2nd Defendant leave to file additional evidence corroborating this, which they did, and in consequence allowed C to file evidence and submissions after the hearing in reply to that fresh evidence, as he too has done. (His submissions also went beyond that, as further considered below.) His evidence on this point does not refute or cast serious doubt on the clear evidence that the timing system is as the 2nd Defendant asserts, and even at the interim stage I am satisfied that he will not be able to prove otherwise.

 

 

    1. As to Ms Kirby’s alleged admission, at para. 12 of her Witness Statement dated 12 October 2011, I have considered it in its context. What she is plainly there saying is that because, for reasons of English law, the 2nd Defendant wishes to have prior sight of all material posted on the British website, it has chosen not to have a discussion board (which might permit direct postings). It is clear to me that this is not an admission in the terms claimed by C but rather the reverse.

 

 

    1. Were it not for the hyperlink question, I would therefore conclude on this issue that the 2nd Defendant had satisfied me that it plainly bore no responsibility for the US website or its contents. However, C has maintained from his first submissions that “the websites link to each other and there is no clear distinction for users” (para. 9f, submission of 17 September 2011). So far as I can see, this is not dealt with expressly in the 2nd Defendant’s evidence; at the hearing I was assured that the link ran from the US to the UK website but not vice versa, and this appeared to be true so far as any express hyperlink was concerned. In his 18 November 2011 response following the hearing, Mr McGrath went a little beyond my limited permission to make further submissions by stating at para. 3 that: “this is demonstrably untrue; simply click the “home” button on the UK .org website and one is taken to the “US” .netsite where the comments section is clearly visible”. I have done so, on several occasions and with several different devices, and he appears to be correct. One goes straight into the .netsite, and indeed to the index to its .net forum, without even being notified (whether by the usual “click” hyperlink or otherwise) that one is changing websites. This is a short point, but of considerable importance, and apparently inconsistent with the 2nd Defendant’s original evidence and submissions.

 

(The 2nd Defendant has since this judgment was circulated in draft accepted that its evidence was wrong on this point, and the structure of the UK website has been altered to remove this or any similar link to the forum, which of course remains accessible via the US website.)

 

    1. The law on liability for hyperlinks is in a state of some uncertainty at present. Even if the general English rule were to be as recently held in Canada, that a mere hyperlink does not render the operator of the linking website liable for the content of the linked site, the decision may well be a fact-sensitive one, especially when, as here, the two websites are very closely associated, the link is hidden, and the point of contact is the “Home” button which is normally regarded as taking you to the central hub of the same website you are already on. I therefore conclude that I am not satisfied at this stage that the 2nd Defendant was not answerable for the .net forum at the material time, and that it is a question fit for trial. This part of the 2nd Defendant’s application fails.

 

 

    1. The 1st Defendant. As above stated, an individual will not normally be held liable for a libel published by a company with which he is connected, unless he himself played a sufficient part in the particular publication to render himself personally liable for it. The case against Prof. Dawkins was originally put on the basis of his general responsibility for the website, and as such would have failed for that reason. However, in his evidence he has very frankly admitted that he was, at the material time, one of the four administrators of the US website, any one of whom might have read the 4th Defendant’s original posting and authorised its publication on the website (thus exposing themself to personal liability for that item). There is said to be no record of who approves a particular item. He does not remember reading this item, and if, as appears to be the case, it was approved at 11.18 on a Sunday morning UK time, the likelihood is that he did not because his usual practice is to visit his parents at about that time. (Ms Kirby adds that neither she nor the other two administrators can say whether they did so.)

 

 

    1. It appears to me that this is a classic instance of a disputed issue of fact which cannot properly be dealt with on an application such as the present. It is true that, if the above evidence is correct (and C is not obliged to accept it), then it would appear on the balance of probabilities that Prof. Dawkins is not personally liable. At present C has no direct evidence to refute it. But this litigation is at the earliest possible stage. The 1st and 2nd Defendants have not even filed a Defence. There has been no disclosure, for example of the diaries or emails of Prof. Dawkins and his colleagues for the relevant day which might affect, one way or another, the probabilities as to who approved this item. Two of the four candidates have not served witness statements, and none has been cross-examined. Following some or all of these processes, it is entirely possible that Prof. Dawkins’s present recollection may at trial prove likely to be in error. I therefore refuse this part of the application by the 1st Defendant, so far as it relates to the original posting which he may actually have approved for publication; in relation to the later contributions, no case is made out against him personally.

 

 

    1. The 3rd Defendant. Amazon is of a different nature from the campaigning and polemic 1st and 2nd Defendants, as their different websites show. For this reason, Amazon’s case on liability for publication is also different. It accepts that the words complained of appeared on a website which it operates. But it relies on the two overlapping statutory defences which have come into existence to update for the internet age the common law defence of “innocent dissemination”, traditionally available to newsagents and others who distribute libellous books and papers without knowledge of their offending content. These are s.1 of the Defamation Act 1996 and Reg. 19 of the Electronic Commerce Regulations 2002, SI 2002/2013 (in turn based on an EU directive).

 

 

    1. Section 1(1) of the 1996 Act is as follows:

 

 

“In defamation proceedings a person has a defence if he shows that:

a. he was not the author, editor or publisher of the statement complained of;

b. he took reasonable care in relation to its publication; and

c. he did not know, and had no reason to believe, that what he did caused or contributed to the publication of a defamatory statement”.

 

The remainder of the section expands on this basic rule and the material provisions are considered below.

 

    1. Reg. 19, which is usually regarded as somewhat more liberal, states:

 

 

“Where an information society service is provided which consists of the storage of information provided by a recipient of the service, the service provider (if he otherwise would) shall not be liable for damages or for any other pecuniary remedy or for any criminal sanction as a result of that storage where –

a. the service provider –

i. does not have actual knowledge of unlawful activity or information and, where a claim for damages is made, is not aware of facts or circumstances from which it would have been apparent to the service provider that the activity or information was unlawful; or

ii. upon obtaining such knowledge or awareness, acts expeditiously to remove or disable access to the information,

and

b. the recipient of the service was not acting under the authority or the control of the service provider”.

 

Again there are supplementary explanatory provisions.

 

    1. Amazon seeks to strike out the claim against it on the ground that it is bound to succeed in one or both of these defences. I caution myself that they are fact-based and that I must not do so if there is any real possibility that a crucial fact may not be established at trial, or that other facts may emerge which rebut the defence. Subject to that, Amazon’s evidence on the two crucial areas of fact (its general pre-publication processes and its post-publication responses) was not credibly challenged by any of C’s evidence and may be summarised as follows.

 

 

    1. As to pre-publication processes, the Amazon website is of course of enormous size, since reviews and comments on any of the thousands of books and other products it sells may be posted by any customer. Its user guidelines forbid defamatory material, and it can blacklist offending users. The principal active precaution taken is the use of an automatic filter excluding reviews or comments which either contain certain forbidden words or are submitted by blacklisted users. None of the postings complained of failed either of these tests, so they were displayed without any human intervention. (Reviews, but not comments, which contain the forbidden words are then submitted for manual, i.e. human, review before the final decision to exclude is taken. There was a dispute between C and Amazon about the distinction between reviews and comments, but it is largely of academic interest because there is no reason to suppose that any manual review took place here, the forbidden words not having been used .) I do not understand C to be saying that Amazon was at fault so far as the selection of filtering criteria is concerned.

 

 

    1. Post-publication, there are several steps open to a person who is aggrieved by a review or comment.

 

a. Each item contains a “Report Abuse” button which permits the reader to report the item as “inappropriate”. C says he did so, and Amazon accepts that he did on some occasions. But it turns out that this would have been of little effect because (unknown to readers) Amazon will not consider an item for removal on this ground unless 3 or more different users report it, which did not happen.

b. Pressing the “Report Abuse” button also gives one the option of reporting the item as defamatory by pressing a further link, which takes one to Amazon’s Notice and Takedown Procedure.

c. The Notice and Takedown Procedure forms part of Amazon’s general Conditions of Use and Sale, to which there is a link on every webpage. Condition 8 reads as follows:

 

“Defamation Claims

Because Amazon.co.uk lists millions of products for sale on the website and hosts many thousands of comments, it is not possible for us to be aware of the contents of each product listed for sale or each comment or review that is displayed. Accordingly Amazon.co.uk operates on a “notice and takedown” basis. If you believe that any content on, or advertised for sale on, the website contains a defamatory statement, please notify us immediately by following our Notice and Procedure for Notifying of Defamatory Content. Once this procedure has been followed, Amazon.co.uk will make all reasonable endeavours to remove the defamatory content complained about within a reasonable time.”

d. Clicking on the words underlined leads one to a pro forma document which one is invited to fill in, print off, sign and post to Amazon’s legal department in Slough. That pro forma is in the form of a witness statement, but with content not dissimilar to a defamation protocol letter before action. The complainant is invited to provide:

i. name, address and occupation;

ii. details of the location of the defamatory words, including the web page address;

iii. the exact words complained of;

iv. the reason the words are defamatory;

v. the reasons they are untrue, and what the true position is.

e. Upon receipt, this would be considered by Amazon’s lawyers and dealt with as they considered appropriate, no doubt often by way of taking down the offending item.

 

    1. Of course, though the above procedures are provided by Amazon, there is no legal obligation on the complainant to use them, and the court will consider any communications in fact made in order to assess their terms and effect.

 

 

    1. As above stated, C did report some items as “inappropriate” but that had no effect. He did not use the Notice of Defamatory Content procedure, which in his submissions he pejoratively described as “snail mail” since (presumably because Amazon wants the reassurance of a signed document as a basis for taking action which might be harmful to the other party) the pro forma cannot simply be emailed direct to the legal department. He did take the following steps to bring his grievance to Amazon’s notice:

 

 

a. On 17 September 2010 he emailed Amazon’s Technical Support address complaining about the 4th Defendant’s postings, which he described as “abusive” and “slandering”, referring in particular to a “vendetta” and to being called a “liar”. He named the 4th Defendant and gave his email address, but did not give specific details of the location of the words complained of (though he did refer to “the thread under The Grand Design by Stephen Hawking”). He asked for Mr Jones’s comments to be removed and his account to be considered for suspension or deletion.

Technical Support replied the next day saying that they were unable to take any action – they did not forward the email to the legal department or give C any help or advice as to how to pursue the matter. When on 20 September he asked them to pass it on to the appropriate department he received no reply, though this appears to be because he did not use the suggested address.

b. On 30 September 2010 C did make effective contact with the legal department (understandably copying his email to the CEO of Amazon in the USA and to other departments in the hope of ensuring a response). The material parts of this email are as follows:

” http://www.amazon.co.uk/review/T3TIGPA68KMZEQ

The above review and the reviewer Mr V.J.Jones “vjohn82″ are the subject of legal action by McG Productions through solicitors Tollers of Milton Keynes. We have already flagged this person’s comments and reviews against the book The Attempted Murder of God: Hidden Science You Really Need to Know as inappropriate as they attack the author and company in a libellous and defamatory manner. To date Amazon.co.uk has done nothing about it. Please remove immediately all comments by this gentleman in relation to the book, the company and the author and submit for removal all Google cache entries. By allowing these comments on Amazon.co.uk, Amazon.co.uk also becomes implicated in the legal action.”

This was promptly acknowledged the same day by Mr Collins, then head of legal, who then procured the removal of the particular review identified in C’s email; it was taken down before midnight on 30 September 2010, and C so informed.

c. Also removed that night were 14 comments by the 4th Defendant (many but not all of those he had posted). This may have been done by the Customer Service Department independently of the legal department; on 30 September 2010 they emailed C saying that:

“…these comments have been removed from our database and will shortly disappear from the website. We do exercise some editorial control over our customer reviews and strive to block these kinds of reviews. Amazon.co.uk does not tolerate profane or spurious customer reviews. Our intention is to make the customer review forum a place for constructive commentary and feedback, so reviews that fall outside these guidelines are removed from the website.”

d. On 7 November 2010 C emailed Mr Collins again, giving four specific links to reviews and demanding that they be permanently removed as being “subtle defamation” coloured by atheism. No response was sent nor was any action taken. Amazon has given no explanation of this. It appears however that none of these specific items is now sued on.

e. On 1 April 2011 C notified Amazon that he had issued proceedings. Following service, what comments by the 4th Defendant remained on the website were eventually removed on 11 and 12 July 2011.

 

    1. The above account is based on contemporary documents and is not materially disputed by C. It appears to me that there is no sufficient likelihood of a different picture emerging at trial such as would render it inappropriate for me to assess the merits of the proposed statutory defences on a summary judgment application. Although the two defences differ in several material respects, the main factual questions arising each case are broadly similar, and relate to:

 

 

a. the status of the defendant – does he qualify for protection at all?

b. the defendant’s conduct and state of knowledge (and consequent responsibility) in relation to the particular publication complained of, prior to complaint;

c. the defendant’s response upon being informed of the defamation – is it sufficient?

 

    1. As to whether the defendant qualifies for protection, Reg. 19 sets a positive test:

 

– does D provide an information society service which consists of the storage of information provided by a recipient of the service? And does the claim arise as a result of that storage?

S.1 of the 1996 Act sets a negative test:

– D must not be the author, editor or publisher of the statement; but a person will not be considered the author, editor or publisher if (to give the most applicable statutory example) he is only involved in operating or providing any system or service by means of which the statement is made available in electronic form.

So far as the Reg. 19 test is concerned, it is clear that the service Amazon provides to its users, of storing their reviews and comments for reading by others, falls within that definition.

 

    1. So far as s.1(1)a of the 1996 Act is concerned, the position is made more complex by the introduction of the concepts of editing and publishing, and by the use of the word “only” in relation to the operation of the system or service.

 

On this issue, C objects:

a. that Amazon cannot be regarded as merely a passive or neutral medium for storing and distributing material provided by others. It is running the website for its own profit and has a clear commercial interest in encouraging lively debates between its customers on the product-related forums; and

b. that it does exercise a measure of editorial control over content, sufficient to deprive it of protection.

 

    1. The first point is, in effect, that Amazon is a “publisher” within the definition of s.1(2) of the Act, which is:

 

“a commercial publisher, that is, a person whose business is issuing material to the public or a section of the public, who issues material containing the statement in the course of that business”.

So far as the concept of “issuing” is concerned, there is no doubt that the 1996 Act was intended to preserve the established distinction between publishers who originate books and other publications, and distributors and sellers who pass on to the public the books originating from the publishers; see s. 1(3)a. “Issuing” refers to the former process, not the latter one.

Amazon’s primary business (for present purposes) is of course that of an online bookseller rather than a publisher. That is where its revenue comes from, not from the operation of the website (which is free to users). Ancillary to its business, a traditional bookseller might well issue free publications of its own such as catalogues and advertisements, but nobody would therefore describe its business as that of a publisher. In the same way, it follows that even though Amazon may well be the “publisher” of the website and its user-generated content, in the broad sense in which that term is used in defamation law, and may well do so in the course of its business (i.e. as a means to its primary purpose of retailing the products of others) it is nevertheless plainly not a “commercial” publisher within the definition of s.1(2).

 

    1. As to the second point, whether by adopting a policy of limited pre-publication control Amazon has become an “editor” (i.e. “a person having editorial or equivalent responsibility for the content of the statement or the decision to publish it” under s.1(2)), this is an illustration of the notorious “Catch-22” under which an ISP seeking to attract the statutory defence by taking reasonable care may find that it has instead forfeited it by becoming an editor. In the present case, Amazon took no steps in relation to the content of any of the statements, and no part in any decision to publish it, except by way of the automatic process referred to above. (The manual review was never triggered; had it been, the position might have been very different.) So far as these publications were concerned, Amazon’s only role was as provider of the system or service through which Mr Jones was able to publish them, and I conclude that it is clear by virtue of s. 1(3)c that it was not an editor. (I note that this is the “cautious” view of the editors of Duncan and Neill (3rd edn. 2009) at 20.08).

 

 

    1. It being established that Amazon is in principle entitled to rely on each of the statutory defences, the next set of issues concerns its conduct and state of knowledge prior to being informed of C’s complaints. Under Reg.19, the question is again a simple one with a clear answer: Did Amazon have actual knowledge of unlawful activity or information, and/or was it aware of facts or circumstances from which it would have been apparent that the activity or information was unlawful?

 

A corporation can have actual knowledge only through a human representative, and given the vast size and diverse nature of Amazon’s website there is no reason to suppose that anyone in Amazon was actually aware of these postings, let alone of their possible unlawfulness, prior to C’s complaints. C does not put forward any case for such actual prior knowledge.

 

    1. The position under s.1 is again more onerous to the defendant. Even during the pre-complaint period, it must show that it both took reasonable care in relation to the publication and did not know and had no reason to believe that what it did caused or contributed to the publication of a defamatory statement.

 

The use of the word “defamatory” (as opposed to Reg. 19’s “unlawful”) is significant here, because subject to the question of legal innuendo it would be apparent to Amazon upon a first reading whether the words were defamatory, i.e. injurious to reputation. The word “unlawful” in Reg. 19 has been held to import the further requirement that the defendant should also “know something of the strength or weakness of available defences”; see Bunt v. Tilley [2007] 1 WLR 1243, per Eady J at para. 72.

 

    1. On the question of reasonable care, Amazon submits that its procedures as summarised at [33] above meet that standard. The problem on an interim strike-out application is that questions of reasonableness are generally fact-sensitive and will vary from case to case. I note the provisional view of Eady J in Metropolitan International Schools Ltd v. Designtechnica Corpn[2009] EWHC 1765 QB at para. 75 that it was difficult to comprehend how reasonable care could have been taken, when the publication took place without any human input on the part of the defendant (in that case a search engine rather than a website operator, but the point is a similar one here). The counter-arguments are not difficult to envisage (for example, that the automatic processes set a reasonable hurdle, or even that it might be reasonable in the context of a vast website like this to take no pre-publication steps at all) but I cannot say that the answer is obvious at this stage, so the attempt to strike out by reference to s.1 must fail.

 

 

    1. One specific point taken by C on “reasonable care” should however be dealt with. The Act identifies “the previous conduct or character of the author, editor or publisher” as being relevant to whether the distributor took reasonable care. C points out that Amazon has in the past twice been found liable to Lord Trimble for defamation, and that this indicates a bad character for libel, precluding it from relying on the statutory defence. But it is the character of the author (Mr Jones), not that of the distributor (Amazon), which is relevant for this purpose; if Amazon had known him to have a bad record as a defamer, and still allowed him to use its pages (as opposed to putting him on the blacklist) that would plainly be relevant to reasonable care; but there is no evidence that it knew or ought to have known anything about him. (In any event, with so vast a website, one or two such incidents in the past are not likely to be of much assistance in deciding whether reasonable care was taken in this case.)

 

 

    1. Finally on s.1, if I had been satisfied as to reasonable care, there would have been no difficulty in concluding that (pre-complaint) Amazon did not know, and had no reason to believe, that what it did caused or contributed to the publication of a defamatory statement.

 

 

    1. The remaining issue is whether, for Reg. 19 purposes, Amazon:

 

i. had actual knowledge of unlawful activity, and/or was made aware of facts or circumstances from which it would have been apparent that the postings were unlawful (as opposed to defamatory); and if so

ii. acted expeditiously to remove or disable access to them.

This provision of Reg. 19 is amplified by Reg. 22, which provides that in determining actual knowledge a court shall take into account all the circumstances, and in particular:

“whether a service provider has received a notice through a means of contact made available in accordance with regulation 6(1)c” [which requires the provider to make available to the recipient rapid and effective contact details including its e-mail address]

“and the extent to which any notice includes-

i. the name and address of the sender of the notice;

ii. details of the location of the information in question; and

iii. details of the unlawful nature of the activity or information in question”.

(C does not accept that Amazon’s Notice and Takedown Procedure, detailed above, complies with Reg. 22; but assuming that to be correct, a breach of Reg. 6 would not of itself invalidate a Reg. 19 defence.)

Amazon’s case is that in his communications with it C never even clearly specified the location of the postings of which he now complains, let alone set out facts and matters that would show them to be untrue or unfair. As to location, I am not persuaded of the merits of this point. Although C did not give URL addresses for each and every posting, he did specify Mr Jones’s own username, and the topic (Scrooby’s book) to which the objectionable statements related. Amazon’s website includes the facility to look up all other reviews from any reviewer, and as stated it had no difficulty in immediately identifying and removing 14 of Mr Jones’s comments about C.

It remains true, however, that not everything the 4th Defendant has said about C or his book is the subject of complaint. Quite rightly, C recognises others’ rights to comment in strong terms on the literary and intellectual merits of his book and has tried to confine his complaints to other, less obviously legitimate areas. How was Amazon to perform that exercise of discrimination for him, if he did not specify the particular postings, or even parts of postings, of which he complained?

 

    1. But even if he had done that (which, it is plain from his communications with Amazon set out above, he did not) Reg. 19 demands more from a complainant, if the defence is to be overcome. He must disclose facts or circumstances making it apparent that the postings were unlawful. In fairness to Amazon, its pro forma recognises this and invites such disclosure. But C did not use the pro forma, and perhaps as a result did not address this requirement at all. If he omitted to put forward a case on the merits, it would not be possible for Amazon to investigate or adjudicate upon it, nor did the framers of Reg. 19 expect it to do so. For the above reasons, I conclude that the Reg. 19 defence is bound to succeed in respect of Amazon’s liability for all the publications complained of against it, and the claim against the 3rd Defendant must be struck out.

 

(I will however go on to consider in the alternative its case on the other grounds relied on.)

 

 

 

 

 

B. DEFAMATORY MEANING

    1. All four Defendants invite me to address the issue of meaning, and (bearing in mind that the question what the words actually mean is for the jury which may hear the trial of this action) to determine whether the words are capable of bearing the meanings attributed to them by C, and if not then to define the gravest defamatory meanings they are capable of bearing. The claims are pleaded both as natural and ordinary meanings and as “true” or “legal” innuendoes, which require separate consideration. If any of the words are not capable of being defamatory they should be struck out. The less serious the defamatory meanings that survive, the stronger will be the case for dismissing some or all of the remaining claims under Jameelabuse of process principles.

 

 

    1. The principles governing how to determine the meanings which words bear or are capable of bearing are well known, having been set out by Neill LJ in Gillick v. BBC [1996] EMLR 267 at 272-3 and applied in many cases since. The central one for present purposes defines the characteristics of the hypothetical reasonable reader, who: is not naïve but not unduly suspicious; can read between the lines; reads in implications more readily than a lawyer, and indulges in a certain amount of loose thinking; but is not avid for scandal and does not select one bad meaning when other non-defamatory ones are available. Also material to this case is the guidance of the Court of Appeal in Jeynes v. News Magazines [2008] EWCA Civ 130that the characteristics of the publication itself need to be borne in mind, since the hypothetical reasonable reader is taken to be representative of those who read that publication.

 

 

    1. Having determined what meanings the words are capable of bearing, it is then necessary to determine in each case whether that meaning is capable of being a defamatory one. There are various definitions of what is defamatory, the classic one being that set out by the Court of Appeal in Skuse v. Granada [1996] EMLR 278 AT 286 and cited by the editors of Duncan and Neill (supra) at 4.01:

 

 

“A statement should be taken to be defamatory if it would tend to lower the claimant in the estimation of right-thinking members of society generally, or be likelysubstantially to affect a person adversely in the estimation of reasonable people generally or have a tendency to do so“.

(The italicised words are not in the original definition, but have in effect been incorporated into it by the important decision of Tugendhat J in Thornton v. Telegraph Media Group[2010] EWHC 141 QB which recognised the need for a threshold of seriousness as one of the elements of the tort.)

Another aspect of meaning which must be borne in mind in this case is the concept of “vulgar abuse”, which is often relevant now in chatroom or forum internet cases. This is an application of the familiar principle that there is a distinction between the literal meaning of words and their natural and ordinary one; apparently serious words may in their context be so plainly outrageous that they are clearly not intended or understood literally, and may even become devoid of content and not defamatory at all.

Also relevant is the doctrine of “bane and antidote” by which replies and rebuttals can not merely act as mitigation but actually dilute or even eliminate the defamatory meaning, provided they are contained within the same publication.

 

    1. A special feature of chatroom or forum publications is the way in which the thread of words published on the site is continually evolving by the addition of new comments. Depending when a particular reader views the thread, he may see some or all of the eventual total number of comments. In theory this can have several consequences for defamatory meaning and liability.

 

a. While the website operator is prima facie liable for all the contents of the thread, individual contributors are of course liable only for their own words.

b. Those individual contributions must be read in the context of the earlier contributions, which may affect the meaning of the latest one.

c. As later contributors add further comments, the context of the thread as a whole will change. This will affect the meaning of the whole thread, for which the operator is liable; but an individual contributor cannot be held liable for a change in the meaning of his contribution, brought about by the later contributions of third parties which alter its context.

d. Strictly speaking, whenever a new contribution was added, the thread would become a new publication with a different meaning. In the case of a thread with more than a few entries, it would rapidly become impracticable for a judge, let alone a jury, to ascribe a separate defamatory meaning at each point, and then apply it to such meaning-dependent issues as justification.

e. The only practicable course here is to adopt the general approach of treating the final thread as a single publication for context and meaning purposes (albeit with several authors of distinct parts), while carefully avoiding the injustice of holding an individual contributor liable for any material changes in the meaning of his contribution brought about by later contributions from others.

 

    1. Amazon: Words Complained Of. For the above reasons, the essential unit of publication in these cases is the thread, which is equivalent in website terms to a long article in a traditional newspaper, within which the words complained of appear. Unfortunately, in the Particulars of Claim C has obscured this by pleading the 4th Defendant’s Amazon contributions in chronological order without much regard to which threads they appeared in. Helpfully, the 3rd Defendant in its submissions has largely cured this defect by setting out each thread in full and highlighting the words complained of. These schedules will be an appendix to this judgment, but I summarise the essential points below.

 

 

    1. Thread C. This is the original and much the longest thread, eventually comprising 60 comments running to some 60 typed pages. It begins on 9 September with C’s purported review of the Hawking book, in fact a plug for his own. There follow 12 comments in which C and third parties (one of them his alias C.Sheridan) exchange views. At Comment 13, the 4thDefendant joins in, including the following words complained of:

 

– McG Publications is indeed a “publishing” company in the same way that my shed is a large scale production factory churning out hundreds of guitars every year.

– I think that it’s really his own company.

– Don’t take my word for it, do the investigation for yourself….Companies House is a useful resource too especially when you consider that McG Productions (and Publishers) are actually a residentially based business; i.e. it’s a home setup and not what you would realistically call an enterprise. It’s essentially an ego trip for Scrooby.

C replied at length in Comment 14, and added Comment 15 on a different point. They then exchanged Comments 16 and 17, and Mr Jones added 18, which includes the following words complained of:

– The problem I have is when a small publisher is set up for a specific purpose- creationist dogma.

– (1) McG Productions has a “publishing arm” run out of a residential address (despite your denial to the contrary because if you publish the business address on your website and Companies House, a cursory Google Earth search on the address reveals residential addresses….A publishing company that promotes 1 author in 9 months of operation is not a company that is destined to make money.

C replied at length in Comment 19, and the 4th Defendant in Comment 20, which includes the following words complained of:

-someone with a creationist mindset and also one so close minded that they restrict their search for god under the guise of one religion.

– I cannot stand those who try to piggy back off the success of others.

– I do not need to hide behind phony publishing companies operating from a back bedroom to try to give myself some credibility. Your attempt to piggy back on Hawking et al shows the desperation of your creed…

– Now hide behind your pseudonym Chris, hide behind your phony publishing company, hide in your back bedroom.

– I’ve proven that you are a fraud. (The surrounding words, not complained of, are of particular importance as context given the usual significance of the word “fraud”. They are: “You FAKE reviews on other sites, you SET UP accounts to generate FAKE interest, you piggy-back on the success of others-it doesn’t get any more INTELLECTUALLY DISHONEST than that”.)

Their exchange continued in Comments 21, 22, 24, 25, 26, 27 and 28, (comments 23 and 29 were from other users). In Comment 25 Mr Jones did, very regrettably, name C’s two young children (whose names he had found elsewhere on the web) saying that he felt sorry they would be subjected to their father’s “bullsh*t for some time; not surprisingly this distressed C further.

Comment 30 contained the following words complained of:

– he has stooped to the level of contacting someone on facebook to ask about me and try to find out some personal information.

In Comment 31, C threatened the author of Comment 29 (LH) with defamation action. The 4th Defendant’s Comment 32 included the following words complained of:

– You can cite defamation as much as you like but there is such a legal privilege as “fair comment”.

In Comment 33, C set out his complaint to the police against Mr Jones for naming his children, and told him he would be contacted by solicitors. Comment 34 was from LH. In Comment 35, Mr Jones replied to Comment 33, including the following words complained of:

– Content is hostile? What, showing you up to be a fraud?

– …actual attempts to coerce information from other people about me

He also added Comment 36; C replied with Comment 37. Comment 38 was from LH and 39 and 40 from Mr Jones again. At 41, he included the following words complained of (referring to a statement of C’s in his letter to the police that MCG was protecting its employees and their children):

– Are you an employee then Chris? Looks like you are falsely representing your position here…

Perhaps surprisingly in view of the accusations of fakery, C chose to reply to this (at 42) with a long posting under his other alias of “Reviewer”, purporting to be an independent reader of the book and urging Mr Jones “in all candour and kindness” not to post a single word more. At 43, a real third party urged them to stop “poking each other”. At Comment 44 the 4thDefendant posted the last words complained of under this thread:

– …”Catholic Creationist takes Amazon critic to court for saying his book is BS”…

– it really is too much fun to show up creationist book writer wannabes who spread ridiculous science around the place

– A parody? The best a dying man can come up with is a “parody”…?

(This was on 12 September 2010.)

Comment 45 was from “Reviewer” (i.e. C again) saying that Mr Jones’s “deceits and slanders will not look good in court” and accusing him of “hypocrisy, small-mindedness, ill-placed vanity, intellectual dishonesty” and “psychological and emotional disturbance”. The thread continued with further contributions from Mr Jones (46, 49, 53, 55, 57), C or his aliases (47, 51, 59 and 60), and third parties (48, 50, 52, 54, 56, 58). The last two comments, on 13 September 2010, were effectively one very long 6-page posting by C, dealing mainly with the intellectual side of the debate and in particular the question of parody.

 

    1. Amazon; Thread D. This thread also began with a review of the Hawking book, but this time a bona fide review (by Emc2) posted on 9 September 2010. There followed a series of 9 comments debating the book’s thesis in an intelligent and polite manner. At Comment 10, C (as Scrooby) intervened with a long plug for his own book, beginning “Here’s just a taster of why Hawking’s book is nonsense and why he knows God exists; the rest is in “The Attempted Murder of God”. (This is of course a serious attack on the intellectual honesty of Prof. Hawking, and demonstrates how far C was prepared to go to provoke a reaction that might help his book.)

 

The original debaters responded at Comments 11 to 14.

At Comment 15, on 13 September 2010, the 4th Defendant entered the fray; the whole Comment is complained of.

– Scrooby has already been outed as a chancer. I can’t believe he is still pimping his book out to all and sundry. I wrote a review on his book and received threats of police and legal action…ridiculous. The guy is a delusional crackpot.

At Comments 16, 17 and 18, the original debaters ignored this and continued their discussion. C joined in at Comment 19, ignoring Comment 15 and saying he would never mock people for their non-belief. Mr Jones responded to that at Comment 20 (17 September 2010) including the following words complained of:

– “I would never mock people for their non-belief”. Liar. Simple as that. In fact Chris was so incensed with my critique of his book and for my Atheist belief that he complained to Thames Valley Police and threatened legal action….You’re an embarrassment to the human race and you were found out.

The thread appears to have ended there.

 

    1. Amazon; Thread G. This thread begins with a review, not of the Hawking book but of the Scrooby book itself. It was posted on 10 September 2010 by “Lifesagame”. Its tone is clear from its headline: “Complete garbage written by a moronic hack”. It was not written by Mr Jones, but (perhaps understandably) C thought it had been and posted Comment 1, which attacked him and his views in no uncertain terms. Lifesagame replied with Comment 2, and then Mr Jones with Comment 3 which included the following words complained of, similar to some of Thread C:

 

– You set up a publishing company in your bedroom to peddle this pathetic piece of literature and then hide behind the pseudonym “Scrooby”. Shall I tell you how desperate you are? You’ve piggybacked your book on the back of Stephen Hawking’s work; a chronically disabled guy…

– Are you really that sick and depraved to have to resort to this sort of behaviour?

– I feel sorry for your kids who it seems will be subjected to your bullsh*t for some time to come.

C replied with Comments 4 and 5, threatening police action; Mr Jones in turn posted Comments 6 and 7. This was on September 11th; the thread then lay dormant until 9 July 2011 when Mr Jones added Comment 8, reporting that libel proceedings had been issued.

 

    1. Amazon; Thread H. Again, this thread begins with a review of Scrooby’s book, posted by a third party C.J. Cook, and summarised by its headline ” * Don’t believe the 5-star reviews”. (Apparently C had opened other threads on his book with 5-star reviews posted by himself under his aliases, as Cook pointed out.) The 4th Defendant and Cook were the only contributors, and at Comment 5 on 4 October 2010 Mr Jones posted the following words complained of:

 

– The legal claim was completely unfounded, the police were not interested in him using his corporation as a soapbox for his insidious views and he has been shown up to be quite the charlatan.

The only other entry was his posting on 9 July 2011 that legal proceedings had been issued.

 

    1. Amazon; Pleaded Natural and Ordinary Meanings. Because of the way in which C set out the words complained of, it is difficult to attribute his pleaded meanings to the different threads as they should have been. However, the claimant’s pleaded meanings are not binding on a court ruling on what meanings the words are capable of bearing, except that they set an upper limit of gravity, and that the court will not put forward a new meaning of its own, different in nature from those complained of. It is therefore right to summarise the pleaded natural and ordinary meanings attributed by the Particulars of Claim to the 4th Defendant’s words on the 3rd Defendant’s website; I have sought to group them according to two broad subject areas.

 

 

a. Misconduct in business

i. that the Claimants have no good professional standing in business and should not be traded with or engaged for their goods or services;

ii. that the business takes place in a bedroom and is therefore not a realistic business enterprise;

iii. that the 2nd Claimant was set up for the sole purpose of realising the failed writing and publishing ambitions of the 1st Claimant in a vanity publishing venture; therefore the content of the book can have no merit and should not be bought or read, and the Claimants lack professional integrity;

iv. that the Claimants set up a fraudulent publishing company operated by a fraudulent character;

v. that they are liars when they claim their business address is not a residential address;

vi. that the 2nd Claimant company is run by a man with the bad personal characteristics of the 1st Claimant (see below).

b. Personal dishonesty or misconduct of the 1st Claimant

i. that he is a narrow-minded religious fundamentalist;

ii. that he lied about believing that he had a terminal illness;

iii. that he engaged in an act of persuasion to make an unwilling person disclose information about him through force or threats;

iv. that he is immoral, cognitively deficient, and intends to deceive the public by hiding behind a pseudonym;

v. that he lied to the police about being an employee;

vi. that he is mentally unstable with lunatic notions;

vii. that he lies when he says he would not mock people for their non-belief;

viii. that he is a swindler with repellent religious beliefs;

ix. that he is a liar when he claims that his book was intended as a parody.

 

    1. Amazon; Legal Innuendo Meanings. At various points in the Particulars of Claim C uses the term “innuendo”. Sometimes he uses it in the sense of a “false innuendo”, that is, simply a natural and ordinary meaning, albeit one that is implicit in the words and needs to be spelt out. But in one important respect his case (in respect of both websites) goes further. It is his case that the word “creationist” has acquired a special meaning in recent years, going beyond its literal and non-defamatory one of “a person who believes in the divine or supernatural creation of the universe, as opposed to a purely natural cause”. He says that it now means, at least to some people, a person who is: a malicious liar, a fascist, homophobic, anti-western society and a danger to the education of children.

 

In relation to the Dawkins website, which is aimed at a specialist audience of people not merely interested in the science/religion debate but taking a hard line on one side, it is easy to see why C makes that case for a legal innuendo meaning, and it will be considered in detail below. But in relation to the Amazon website, whose readership even of reviews of specialist books is drawn from the general population (albeit readers who are likely to have some prior interest in the book under review or its author or subject) he has laid no groundwork for the proposition that some of those readers are possessed of any special knowledge or information which would lead them to understand the word “creationist” differently from the public at large, let alone in the strongly pejorative sense set out above. So in relation to the Amazon website, I am satisfied that there is no case for any true innuendo meaning of the kind sought to be relied on, and that it should be struck out.

(I should add that it is arguable that, even in general use, the word “creationist” has now developed a more specific natural and ordinary meaning than the literal one set out above, such as “a fundamentalist Christian who believes in the literal truth of the biblical account of creation and rejects Darwin’s theory of natural selection”; but that again is a perfectly respectable and widely-held belief, and not one the holding of which would lower a person’s reputation in the estimation of reasonable people or have a tendency to do so.)

 

    1. I therefore turn to the two related questions:

 

– What are the highest or most serious meanings about the Claimants which the Amazon words (all written by Mr Jones) are capable of bearing?

– And in each case, is that capable of being a defamatory meaning?

For the reasons given above, this is best approached on a thread-by-thread basis rather than in the manner used in the Particulars of Claim.

 

    1. As to Thread C, applying the principles summarised above, and having read the thread as a whole from the standpoint of the hypothetical reasonable reader, I find that the 1st Claimant has a sufficient case that it is capable of bearing the following meanings defamatory of him personally, and passing the Thornton level of seriousness; (I indicate the particular sections of the words complained of that may generate those meanings when considered in context):

 

 

a. that he has behaved unethically by trying to piggy-back off the success of others (Comment 20);

b. that he is an intellectual fraud because he fakes reviews, seeks to generate fake interest, piggy-backs off the success of others and is for these reasons intellectually dishonest (Comments 20, 35,);

c. that he has acted improperly by contacting one of Mr Jones’s Facebook friends and seeking to coerce personal information about Mr Jones from them (Comments 30 and 35);

d. that he has falsely represented to the Police that he is an employee of the 2nd Claimant company when he is not (Comment 41, read in the context of Comment 37 in particular);

e.(i). that the scientific views in his book are ridiculous;

e.(ii). so is his claim to have written his book as a parody when he believed that he was dying (Comment 44).

 

    1. I also accept that Thread C is capable of bearing the meaning or meanings that he is a creationist, a dogmatist, a Christian, a Catholic, and a person who seeks God through one religion only (Comments 20 and 44); but, even allowing for the opprobrious manner in which the 4th Defendant expresses himself on these points, I am satisfied that no jury properly directed could conclude that it was defamatory of the 1st Claimant to hold those views known to be shared by many well-respected members of society, even if others including the 4th Defendant vigorously disagree with those views.

 

(This topic is further considered below in relation to innuendoes on the Dawkins website.)

 

    1. In relation to the 2nd Claimant company, and the 1st Claimant in his capacity as its human principal, I accept that the words complained of are capable of bearing the following meanings in relation to them:

 

i. that it is a very small company;

ii. that it has no separate premises but is run from Mr McGrath’s home;

iii. that it was set up by Mr McGrath for the sole purpose of giving credibility to his creationist book;

iv. that for this reason it is not destined to make any money;

v. and that also for this reason it is phony.

(See particularly Comments 13, 18, and 20.)

 

    1. However, I do not consider that meanings i-iv are capable of being defamatory of either Claimant. I accept the 3rd and 4th Defendants’ contentions that these matters, taken separately or together, do not impute any misconduct, nor would they tend to injure the Claimants’ reputation or standing in business. There is nothing wrong with a business being small or unprofitable, or having a limited, even a propagandist, purpose, or with it being run from home; and no reasonable jury would think so. (The position would be different if it was suggested that the company had made false claims to be larger and better established than was in fact the case; but that allegation is not to be found in the words complained of.)

 

As to meaning v., of course the word “phony” is an opprobrious one, and generally capable of bearing a defamatory sting; but here I conclude that the principle of vulgar abuse applies, and that a reasonable reader would certainly recognise that Mr Jones was using it as shorthand for his previous observations about the company rather than as implying that it was phony in any different or stronger sense.

 

    1. I should also deal specifically with Comment 32, in which Mr Jones responded to C’s threats of libel action by referring to “fair comment”. In the context of the stage their debate had reached by that point, I do not consider that any reasonable reader would think the less of C by reason of that observation, however limited their knowledge of the law of libel. (Had he said he would rely on the defence of “truth”, the position might perhaps have been different.)

 

 

    1. It follows that on meaning grounds:

 

a. those of the words complained of from Thread C which do not give rise to the meanings set out at 62 a-e above should be struck out;

b. those meanings should be substituted for the meanings at present pleaded by the 1st Claimant, which insofar as they are not to the same effect I consider to be rhetorical and far-fetched and to go beyond any meaning a reasonable reader might draw from this Thread;

c. the 2nd Claimant has no case in respect of Thread C.

 

    1. Applying a similar approach to the other, shorter threads complained of, my conclusions are as follows:

 

 

Thread D As to Comment 15, the words used are strong but their content is minimal; it is a clear example of vulgar abuse, especially in the context of this otherwise thoughtful and measured thread. (The word “pimping” in relation to the marketing of a book conveys no sexual or otherwise seriously derogatory connotation nowadays.)

Comment 20 however is capable of bearing the following defamatory meaning of the 1st Claimant only:

f. that he is a liar who falsely claims not to mock non-believers, when in fact he is so hostile to Mr Jones’s atheist beliefs that for that reason he threatened him with police and legal action.

 

Thread G For the reasons above stated, the allegation in Comment 3 that the book has been published from a bedroom is not capable of being defamatory of either Claimant. The Comment does however bear the following meanings defamatory of the 1st Claimant:

g. that he has improperly sought to gain commercial advantage for himself by piggy-backing on the work of a disabled person; and

h. that this conduct can fairly be described as desperate, sick and depraved.

The remark about C’s children cannot add anything but emphasis to the above stings. In that sense it is vulgar abuse, but it remains a proper subject of complaint as part of the passage complained of and as being relevant to damage.

(I should add, since it is a point of some importance to C, that although he complained of the words which referred to the well-known fact that Prof. Hawking suffers from a very serious physical disability, he did not refer to that disability in his pleaded meaning, because he respects the fact that Prof. Hawking does not seek to take any advantage of his disability. I understand this; but the defamatory implication here, which I consider it plain that right-thinking people would or might share, is that it is particularly wrong for others to take improper advantage of the work of a disabled person.)

 

Thread H A special feature of this thread is that, unlike the others, it consists solely of exchanges between Mr Jones and one other contributor, C.J. Cook, who appears to be familiar with the dispute from other threads ; it does not contain as much contextual material as the others, and therefore its words are much more easily taken at face value by a reader.

Comment 5 is plainly capable of bearing a defamatory meaning about the 1st Claimant, as follows:

i. that he is a charlatan because he makes unfounded threats of legal action.

(This was in fact partially corrected by the 4th Defendant himself in July 2011, when he added Comment 6 – “You might be interested to know that a legal claim has been issued”.)

It is also capable of bearing the following meaning about both Claimants: that the 2nd Claimant is a vehicle used by the 1st Claimant to put forward insidious views. But any defamatory element in this meaning would only be conveyed by the word “insidious” which in the context of this thread is no more than a shorthand for “religious views of which I disapprove” and is plainly vulgar abuse.

 

The same consequences must follow as set out at [66] above, except that in relation to Thread H the company will also have a claim.

 

    1. Dawkins Website; Words Complained Of. There is only one thread on the Dawkins website; but not all the words complained of were written by the 4th Defendant. It begins with an article by the 4th Defendant, posted on 12 September 2010 and headlined “Dare to criticise a creationist? Be prepared to be sued…” and continues with 40 comments, taking up some 24 typed pages; again these should be annexed to this judgment. Of the 40 comments, 11 are from Mr Jones, but only one (Comment 33) is sued on. 10 other comments are sued on, from Roger J. Stanyard (1, 2 and 11), Steve Hill (15, 17 and 27), Alan4discussion (20, 28 and 40), and Steve Zara (23).

 

 

    1. In the original article, the following passages are complained of:

 

 

– Dare to criticise a creationist? Be prepared to be sued.

– The Grand Design by Stephen Hawking and Leonard Mlodinow…is being sold on Amazon.

– One such person decided, rather than actually read the book, to instead pimp their own book called “The Attempted Murder of God: Hidden Science You really Need to Know” by author Scrooby…clearly a pseudonym.

-Anyway, I’m a Historian by degree and tend to look at books in a different way. For instance I will not only read the book but I’ll research the author, the publisher, the sources, and look for behavioural patterns to ascertain the writer’s intentions, motives and bias. I did exactly the same for Scrooby that I do for any author/publisher… the most pertinent facts are: …

2. The McG Publishing company and McG Publications are run out of a bedroom somewhere…

3. The company was set up to bring out the author Scrooby who is in fact Chris McGrath…

4. Chris McGrath has claimed that he has scientific proof for the evidence of god, however this does not appear in the book. There are also zero scientific sources in the book from any peer reviewed scientist or indeed any scientist for that matter.

5. Indeed Chris McGrath is not a scientist … he is in fact a failed film student from Bournemouth University…

– Anyway, this guy has now claimed he is informing the police and taking legal action for my criticisms of his work…

– I’ve never heard of legal action being taken where you take apart a creationist’s case.

– TAGGED: CREATIONISM, DISHONESTY, FLEAS, IRRATIONALITY, LAW, STEPHEN HAWKING, WINGNUTS. (These tag-words appear alongside the article and can be used to link it to other articles on the website similarly tagged. The tags were apparently selected by Mr Jones from a list available on the website.)

 

    1. In response to this article the following words complained of were posted, mostly as part of longer comments. (Again, I am obliged to counsel for the 1st and 2nd Defendants for disentangling them from the pleading and allocating them to their respective sources.)

 

 

Comment 1- The police have long experience of receiving letters or whatever from one-man-band religious nutters. The guy you’re dealing with doesn’t even have any connections with other nutters. When we (I) was hit by the nutters we had good reason to believe that the shooting match was organised by at least two well known creationist organisations (one with an annual budget of millions); the front man also did a runner afterwards (to Kenya).

Comment 2- I forgot to add, please continue to kick Scooby in the goolies and that is how he is treating you. [Only the italicised words are complained of.]

Comment 11- McGrath appears to have a wife and family to support out of the proceeds of sale of his one and only book. That’s the real measure of his desperation. He’s set up a business and is screwing up at the first stage… Better off on the dole. [Just sit back and] let him hang himself.

Comment 15- Small point – a company is a “person” in law. It has human rights. It can sue for libel. But this clown won’t get anywhere.

Comment 17- The usual wingnut drivel.

Comment 20- The fundamentalist who knows he’s right. You could for a few pounds get details of his company’s assets and directors from Companies House….Try to do this in a way that makes HIM do all the work. Don’t give an unnecessary detail or justification. Let him write and ask again. Be mimalist [sic] in any letters to any third parties he tries to use and keep a folder of any letters.

Comment 27- Any fool can set up a publishing company and a pretty website and put a sample chapter on line. The danger is that creationism’s army of useful idiots will be impressed by the free sample chapters and question no more (if they ever did). But then they’re the sort of people who probably never get to the end of a book anyway because it hurts their brains.

Comment 28- A try-on by a disreputable idiot.

Comment 33 [From the 4th Defendant]- Glad I’m not the only one who thinks he’s a chancer.

Comment 40- This is a classic example of creationist thinking. CMcG …sets up a commercial organisation to make money and spread his confused ideas, also giving him apparent status as managing director…The big money creationists of like mind make a similar pretense of independense by reviewing each other’s work. The posing as managing director of a non-entity company is similar. The big money outfits set up creationist “educational institutions”.

 

    1. The Dawkins Website; Natural and Ordinary Meanings. The meanings pleaded in respect of the original article and subsequent comments are similar to those alleged in the case of Amazon, but the distinction between the personal and business allegations is less clear-cut, and little attempt is made to attribute them to particular passages or comments. They are in summary as follows.

 

 

The Claimants are:

i. liars and swindlers of ill-repute;

ii. exhibiting cognitive deficiencies;

iii. morally corrupt Creationist writers and publishers;

iv. both deserving of the utmost ridicule;

v. (the 1st Claimant only) deserving of physical violence to his genital area;

vi. people who will sue you if criticised;

vii. despicable self-publicists with cognitive deficiency;

viii. not a realistic business but a business which takes place in a bedroom and should not be traded with;

ix. not intellectually credible, all the science in their book being from their own imagination;

x. (the 1st Claimant is) a failed film student, so failure attends all his enterprises and his business is not one with which to deal;

xi. anti-Atheist bigots, obstinately and intolerantly devoted to their own opinions and prejudices, and exhibiting intolerance and animosity towards atheists.

(Meanings vi-xi are described in the alternative as innuendoes, but this must refer to “false” innuendo because a case on “legal or true” innuendo is pleaded separately.)

 

    1. Reading the Dawkins thread as a whole, while addressing myself particularly to the words actually complained of, my conclusion is that it is capable of bearing the following meanings, defamatory or potentially defamatory, of the Claimants. Unless otherwise specified, the 4th Defendant shares responsibility for that meaning.

 

 

The 1st Claimant

j. that he had abused his right to review the Hawking book, by using the review to promote his own book;

k. that he had falsely claimed to have scientific proof in his book for the existence of God, when in fact no scientific sources are relied on;

l. that he had failed his university course in film studies; I reject unhesitatingly the 1st, 2nd and 4th Defendants’ contention that it is not capable of being defamatory to say that someone has failed his degree.

(All the above are derived principally from the 4th Defendant’s originating review.)

m. that he was failing financially in business (Comment 11, not the 4th Defendant’s);

n. that he had engaged in a pretence by reviewing his own work (Comment 40, not the 4th Defendant’s).

 

The 2nd Claimant

o. that it was failing financially in business (Comment 11, not the 4th Defendant’s).

 

    1. As to the other passages and allegations complained of, I have already indicated why it is not capable of being defamatory of either Claimant to allege that the 2nd Claimant company is “run out of a bedroom” or set up to publish one book, as alleged in the originating posting. The allegation in the review that he is informing the police and taking legal action is likewise not capable of bearing a defamatory meaning in this context, those being his rights. And the references to him as a creationist or fundamentalist are not capable of being defamatory in their natural and ordinary meaning; see [63] above.

 

 

    1. The other comments complained of, though unpleasant, are plainly vulgar abuse which would carry no weight with an internet reader of this website:

 

– “nutter” (Comment 1);

– “please continue to kick him in the goolies [as that is how he is treating you]” (Comment 1);

– “Let him hang himself” (Comment 11) plainly in context not literally intended;

– “clown” (Comment 15);

– “the usual wingnut drivel” (Comment 17);

– “fool…idiots…hurts their brains” (Comment 27);

– “a try-on by a disreputable idiot” (Comment 28);

– “a chancer” (Comment 33).

 

    1. For these reasons the pleaded natural and ordinary meanings relied on against the 1st and 2nd Defendants (and the 4th Defendant insofar as he is the author of the passages giving rise to them) are again rhetorical and far-fetched, and they and the words complained are liable to be struck out except insofar as they are within the limits of [72] above.

 

 

    1. The Dawkins Website; Legal Innuendo Meanings. A legal or true innuendo gives rise to a further cause of action, separate from that based on natural and ordinary meaning. As already stated, the Dawkins website (unlike Amazon’s) is directed at a group of people with a well-defined special interest and indeed a definite intellectual position within it. It is therefore entirely possible that its readers, or many of them, may share specific knowledge or a specific jargon so that particular words or phrases convey something different to them than to the general reader, that is, a legal innuendo. In his Particulars of Claim, C refers for this purpose to the tags CREATIONISM, DISHONESTY, FLEAS, IRRATIONALITY, LAW, STEPHEN HAWKING and WINGNUTS annexed to the thread. He pleads (and it must be accepted at this stage of the case) that (to summarise):

 

 

a. Prof. Dawkins has adopted a quotation from W.B. Yeats about his imitators, “But was there ever dog that praised his fleas?” to belittle a theologian who wrote a book with the name “Dawkins” in the title, and his followers are well aware of this as a pejorative epithet for his critics;

b. the Dawkins website contains many harsh criticisms of creationists as “superstitious”, “drooling morons”, “the lunatic fringe of religious people” and so forth, and again its readers are familiar with this usage.

 

    1. The question is whether a reasonable reader of the Dawkins website, familiar with these matters, would or might as a result attribute to the words “creationist” and “fundamentalist” or the other criticisms of the Claimants made on that website a defamatory meaning different from or stronger than that which would be applied by a reader of the same words without that knowledge. The legal innuendo meanings proposed by C at Para. 38 of the Particulars of Claim are as follows:

 

 

– “the Claimants are not merely as inhuman and repugnant as fleas, they are in fact fleas;

– they possess clear mental instability and intellectual feeblemindedness;

– they are lying fundamentalist creationists lacking moral and ethical integrity”.

 

    1. The fallacy in the Claimants’ approach to legal innuendo meanings is that it disregards the fundamental rule that for defamation purposes words bear a single meaning, which is that of the reasonable, right-thinking reader. Knowledge of legal innuendo facts may lead a particular group of readers to a different meaning from that apparent to the general public; but it must remain a meaning which a reasonable person knowing those facts would perceive. For example, if A tells B, a racist, that X is black (or tells him something about X which when added to other information about X in his possession leads him to conclude that X is black), then the racist may draw various adverse inferences about X’s character and think the less of him. But that would not be the conclusion of a reasonable or right-thinking person possessed of the same knowledge; so A’s words would not become defamatory by reason of his hearer’s unreasonable prejudices.

 

I do not of course mean to suggest by this analogy that the followers of Prof. Dawkins are to be compared with racists. But C does, broadly speaking, take that line. It is his case that the typical reader of the Dawkins website is so prejudiced against religious believers that, upon hearing that a person is a believer or a creationist, he will automatically assume that that person has the negative characteristics stated in the innuendo meaning set out at [77] above. This may not be true; but even if it is true, it is not enough to establish a legal innuendo meaning.

 

    1. In respect of “fleas”, no reasonable person, whatever their knowledge or belief-system, would think that the use of that word in connection with C conveyed the exaggerated meaning alleged; and in respect of “wingnuts” C does not appear to be suggesting that it conveys anything more than its dictionary meaning, which could not be an innuendo. For these reasons the innuendo claim fails against both the 1st and 2nd Defendants.

 

 

C. DAMAGES ISSUES 

    1. As a matter of law, the Defendants take objection to two aspects of C’s claim for damages:

 

a. the contention that the 2nd Claimant company is entitled to aggravated damages;

b. the contention that both Claimants are entitled to exemplary damages.

 

    1. In respect of aggravated damages, the law is clear. Libel damages are intended to compensate for injury to reputation, to act as a public vindication, and to take account of the distress, hurt and humiliation which the libel has caused. (See John v. MGN [1997] QB 586, CA, cited in Duncan and Neill, supra, at 23.07.) Since a limited company has no feelings, it cannot recover aggravated damages; see Collins Stewart v. Financial Times [2006] EMLR 5, Gray J. This is a long-established principle, and C has produced no good reason to doubt its authority or its correctness. (He refers to “religious aggravation”; while disrespect to his religion might well cause aggravation to a human being, a company cannot have a religion.)

 

 

    1. In respect of exemplary damages, C’s arguments merit closer consideration. The two relevant situations in which exemplary damages may be claimed are:

 

a. oppressive, arbitrary or unconstitutional action by servants of the government;

b. the deliberate commission of a tort with the intention of gaining some advantage which will outweigh the compensation otherwise payable.

(See Duncan and Neill, supra, at 23.33.)

Much of C’s pleading and argument on this issue goes to the alleged malice of the 1st, 2nd and 4th Defendants (he accepts that Amazon’s moral guilt is less); but malice alone, absent one of those elements, only gives rise to aggravated damages, not exemplary.

 

    1. As to head (a), C argues that charities are bodies of a public nature, and often discharge public functions, so that the same principles should apply to their conduct as to that of governmental bodies. I remind myself that if this issue is in any way fact-sensitive it would not be appropriate to dismiss it at the outset, before even pleading and disclosure. However, I hold that it is plain and obvious that the facts that charities have to be registered with a public body, and do work of public benefit, do not of themselves give charities a public character, let alone a governmental one, in the sense that those concepts are used in relation to liability for exemplary damages.

 

I do see plenty of room, in a world where government delegates many of its established public functions to charities (in the spheres of housing or health-care for example), for an arguable exemplary claim against a charity if it was acting as an agent of government in committing the act complained of. That is because the purpose of this head is to provide a deterrent sanction against the abuse of public power, especially when that abuse is backed by the public purse and the individuals responsible are hard to call to account.

But there is no sense at all in which the 1st and 2nd Defendants (let alone the 3rd or 4th) are exercising public power when they criticise religion or advocate atheism. A charity of this sort is essentially a private vehicle by which its supporters can educate and inform the public about their standpoint, which very often, and perhaps particularly in this case, will be one which bears no relation to any governmental policy or interest. Such a charity has no power except the power of its ideas. I therefore conclude that it is plain and obvious that head (a) has no application to this case.

 

    1. As to head (b), C again concentrates mostly on the 1st and 2nd Defendants, and contends that their policy is to further their cause, and raise funds to do so, by vilifying those who argue against them. Their response is, firstly, that the law requires that the tort be committed deliberately for financial gain. I am not satisfied that this is correct. The editors of Duncan and Neill, supra, carefully use the phrase “some advantage”, though they indicate at 23.35 that it needs to be a “material” one. They quote an observation of Lord Wilberforce in Cassell v. Broome [1972] AC 1027 that he was far from convinced that Lord Devlin (in Rookes v. Barnard [1964] AC 1129) ever intended to limit punitive damages to cases where a profit motive was shown. I am not aware that the outer limits of “advantage” have yet been authoritatively defined so as to warrant striking out on this point alone.

 

 

    1. The Defendants are on firmer ground with their other two objections:

 

a. that the anticipated advantage in question needs to be derived from the commission of the particular tort, not simply from a general course of business (see the authorities cited byDuncan and Neill at 23.35, note 7); and

b. that the defendant must both know or be reckless that his words are tortious (i.e. not merely defamatory but unlawful) and consciously decide to go ahead having calculated that the chance of advantage outweighs the chance of penalty.

Nowhere in his pleadings or arguments does C put forward a credible case, let alone any evidence, that either of these requirements is fulfilled in the case of any of the Defendants. It is difficult to envisage how the two website campaigns in question, criticising so little-known a target to so small an audience, could materially advance the cause of atheism or damage that of religion; and (unusually) the question of potential libel liability is actually discussed extensively in several of the threads complained of, including the first Dawkins website publication, but always from the standpoint that the publications are justified in the legal and/or popular senses rather than that “we know it’s wrong but we can get away with it (and it’s worth it even if we don’t)”.

For these reasons, I conclude that it is already clear that these claims for exemplary damages are misconceived and bound to fail, and that they should therefore be struck out.

 

    1. Finally on the subject of damages, it is relevant to the Jameel abuse of process arguments, about to be considered, to refer briefly to another matter pleaded by C under the damages heading. He refers to a potentially valuable trademark “20XII”, apparently owned by the 1st or 2nd Claimant. But as I read the pleading, he is not contending that the value of that trademark or of the company’s business in relation to it has actually been damaged as a direct result of these website publications. He fears that it may be, and therefore seeks an injunction; and he refers to the distraction which his involvement in this litigation is causing to the company’s pursuit of that business. In the absence of a claim for special damage, it does not appear to me that that matter is one which adds much weight to C’s case in respect of the Jameel issues.

 

 

D. ABUSE OF PROCESS

    1. All four Defendants invite me to strike out the claim as an abuse of process, under the by now well-established principles first set out in Jameel v. Dow Jones [2005] QB 946, CA. If it can be shown that there has been no real and substantial tort in this jurisdiction, and/or that the Claimant has no prospect of obtaining any damages or other valuable relief proportionate to the resources likely to be expended on the trial, then the action may be struck out as an abuse of process. This is however a jurisdiction to be exercised with the greatest caution, since if misused it would deprive the Claimant of both his Article 6 right to a fair trial and his Article 8 right to protection of his reputation. As stated by Eady J in Kaschke v. Osler [2010] EWHC 1075 (QB) at para.22 “…the court must be vigilant to recognise the small minority of cases in which the legitimate object of vindication is not required or at least cannot be achieved without a wholly disproportionate interference with the rights of the defendants”.

 

 

    1. In support of the contention that this is such a case, the Defendants point me to the following factors:

 

a. the limited extent of publication (in the case of the Dawkins website but not the Amazon one);

b. the limited defamatory meanings (in the light of my rulings on that issue above);

c. the limited margin between the truth about the Claimants’ activities, as admitted by them, and the defamatory stings of which they may properly complain;

d. the mitigating/extinguishing effect of the Claimants’ own publications and responses on Amazon (but not on Dawkins);

e. in the light of all the above, the limited remedies which the Claimants may expect by contrast with the considerable anticipated costs of trial.

The Claimants of course maintain that there are triable issues on all of these points, and that they have a real and substantial case both for worthwhile damages and for an injunction restraining all the Defendants, but in particular the 1st, 2nd and 4th, from repeating these or similar allegations in the future.

 

    1. As to extent of publication within the jurisdiction, Amazon has not sought to rely on this ground whether by evidence or in submissions. It is clear from the threads themselves that a modest but appreciable number of people other than C and the 4th Defendant either actually participated in the online debate or read it and posted their “vote” on whether they found it helpful; and that is likely to be the tip of the iceberg.

 

 

    1. The 1st and 2nd Defendants have put in evidence about the extent of publication. Again, the debate itself had about 13 active participants (some or all of them likely to be within the jurisdiction). The 1st and 2nd Defendants’ technical evidence is that between 147 and 303 devices within the jurisdiction downloaded at least some of the thread, though by the end the number was down to 45. The number of actual readers may have been less. This sets a lower limit for readership of the words complained of; but though it is relatively small I would not regard it as minimal, especially given the likelihood that most of those who read it shared C’s interest in the science/religion debate, though probably not his views on it. (However, these Defendants also correctly observe that C has never alleged that any readers of their website have actually contacted him or had any connection with him; the same is true in respect of Amazon.)

 

C has put forward evidence that the world readership of the .net site as a whole is of the order of 200,000; while of course the number who read it in this country, and the number of those who read the particular discussion strand complained of, are likely to be much less, this casts doubt on the 1st and 2nd Defendant’s figures. He also points out that in relation to any website publication of this sort one must allow for a considerable degree of foreseeable republication by users of the original website.

It follows that in respect of each website I should approach abuse of process on the basis that the number of readers of the words complained of is certainly not so small that the claim should be dismissed on that ground alone, and indeed may be a good deal larger than the Defendants contend. However, the points considered below are of similar force whether the number of readers is small or relatively large.

 

    1. As to the gravity of the defamatory meanings, I refer to the meanings (underlined and lettered a-o) which I have found the words to be capable of bearing, as set out at [62] and [67] (Amazon) and [72] (Dawkins). Though not of the utmost gravity, nor as serious as C would contend, they are by no means trivial allegations.

 

 

    1. However, an important issue in this case, as for example in Kaschke (supra), is the extent of the marginal damage to C’s reputation caused by the words complained of, in the light of what C has himself published or otherwise admitted. Since this exercise involves predicting the likely prospects of success of defences which have not even been pleaded yet, it must be carried out with extreme caution, and based only on C’s own admissions read as narrowly in his favour as is possible. Nevertheless certain matters are clear beyond argument:

 

i. C did seek to promote sales of his own book by means of false reviews, purporting to be the favourable reaction of real independent readers when in fact he had written them himself.

ii. He did seek to take advantage of the reputation of Prof Hawking (a disabled man) to promote his own book, by inserting a puff for his book into the Amazon site for the Hawking book under the false guise of a review of that book.

iii. He did participate in the online Amazon debates using false identities purporting to be real people agreeing with and defending him, when in fact they were just his aliases.

iv. The book is published by his own company, which is a very small business that has only published his book and has no independent premises of its own.

v. The book contains no scientific source references to back up its purported scientific contentions.(This is admitted by C at para. 72.2 of his submission dated 8 November 2011, in which he refers approvingly to his own Yahoo review of his book, again pretending to be independent.)

 

    1. In the light of these very material admissions, it can already be stated with confidence that, in respect of each of the following potential defamatory meanings, a., b., e (i), g., h., j., k., n., and o., as set out above :

 

 

i. The respective Defendants answerable for that meaning are overwhelmingly likely to succeed in defending it on the basis of justification and/or fair comment/honest opinion.

(In reaching this conclusion so far as comment/opinion is concerned I bear in mind the live issue of malice, particularly against the 4th Defendant, but also the rule that in this context “malice” refers only to the putting forward of an opinion which one does not genuinely hold; see Cheng v Paul [2001] EMLR 31. Given that Mr Jones is clearly a person who holds strong opinions of his own on the matters in question, and that in the light of the matters at [92] above there is a strong factual substratum on which his comments/opinions could be based, proving his malice in this strict sense would be a very challenging exercise. Although C has asserted his insincerity he has not indicated any facts or matters which point clearly towards it, as opposed to malice in the wider and more popular sense of hostility or spite.)

In addition, s. 5 of the Defamation Act 1952 would be likely to operate to improve the Defendants’ prospects of success on liability even in respect of the remaining allegations of fact not directly covered by the admissions.

ii. If, contrary to (i) above, such defences should not succeed completely in respect of one or more of those allegations, the effect of the admitted facts and matters at [92] above would be to reduce the damages recoverable for them, probably to a very low or even nominal level.

 

    1. In respect of the Amazon website, and the 4th Defendant’s contributions to it, a further important consideration arises, similar to that referred to by Eady J at para. 10 of Kaschke (supra) when he said:

 

“At all events, the publication of the “right of reply” is a relevant factor to take into account when assessing the application based on abuse of process.”

In this case, we are not dealing merely with a reply by a claimant to allegations previously published by a defendant. As set out at [55] – [58] above, C actually began Amazon Thread C with his spurious review of the Hawking book, inserted himself and his own book into Thread D, and attacked the 4th Defendant on Thread G before the latter had played any part in it. In each of these cases, but particularly Thread C, the Claimants participated fully in the debate on that thread and had full opportunity (which they frequently took) to answer the criticisms made by the 4th Defendant and others. Only in Thread H did C play no part. This participation by C will not only have a substantial effect on any jury’s assessment of the actual defamatory meaning of the words complained of (particularly where the 3rd Defendant’s liability is concerned), but it will certainly operate as a very substantial mitigation. It raises an obvious question: what real and substantial need does C have for a vindication through the courts, when he has already put his case to the original audience at the time of the original publication?

 

    1. So far as remedy is concerned, the above considerations lead to the conclusion that if C recovers any damages they will be minimal by comparison with the very substantial costs of bringing the action to trial. For example, Amazon has put in bills suggesting that its costs for these applications alone already exceed £70,000; and the Claimants’ pleadings and submissions are so voluminous and randomly organised as to suggest that the action will be a long and complicated one.

 

 

    1. As to injunctive relief, there is no reason to suppose that the 1st or 3rd Defendants are likely to defame the Claimants in the future, at least not deliberately so as to be deterred by an injunction or liable in contempt for breaching it.

 

The position is by no means so clear where the 2nd and 4th Defendants are concerned. The 4th Defendant’s intellectual and personal hostility to the Claimants (not the same thing as malice vitiating comment/opinion) is apparent from his postings; and the .net forum (for which the 2nd Defendant may well have been liable and might be again) is a natural home for attacks on those holding C’s views, and is not fully moderated so as to exclude defamatory comments.

 

    1. At this point, it may be helpful to set out again those defamatory allegations which I have found the words to be capable of bearing, and in respect of which there may not be a good substantive defence. (I ignore for this purpose the issues of the 3rd Defendant’s liability for publication, and the mitigating effect of C’s published responses, since those are not relevant to the question of future repetition by the 2nd or 4th Defendants.) They are:

 

 

On the Amazon website:

c. that the 1st Claimant acted improperly by contacting one of the 4th Defendant’s Facebook friends and seeking to coerce personal information about the 4th Defendant from them;

d. that he falsely claimed to the police that he was an employee of the 2nd Claimant when he was not;

e (ii). that his claim to have written the book as a parody when he was dying is ridiculous;

f. that he is a liar who falsely claims not to mock non-believers, when in fact he is so hostile to the 4th Defendant’s atheist views that for that reason he threatened him with police and legal action;

i. that he is a charlatan because he makes unfounded threats of legal action

 

On the Dawkins website:

l. that he had failed his university course in film studies.

 

    1. As to the above allegation concerning the university course, both the 2nd and 4th Defendants have offered undertakings to the Court not to repeat that allegation, and in those circumstances no useful purpose would be served by pursuing the claim against either of them for injunctive relief in that respect. That is an end of the claim against the 2nd Defendant.

 

The 4th Defendant has not offered any undertakings in respect of the above allegations published by him on Amazon (for which the 3rd Defendant is not liable). Further, it appears likely, given his apparent hostility to the 1st Claimant, and the fact that he has recently made further internet publications concerning this case, that he wishes to continue his campaign of criticism of the 1st Claimant (as may be his right).

In these circumstances, unless such undertakings are offered, his application for summary judgment will be allowed only in part, and the action will continue against him alone for the purpose of injunctive relief against republication of those allegations. [At the handing-down of judgment the 4th Defendant indicated that he was reconsidering the question of undertakings and I have granted time for him and C to consider this further.]

 

    1. My conclusions in relation to the abuse of process applications, in the light of all the above considerations taken together, are as follows:

 

a. The 2nd Claimant company has no claim against any of the Defendants worth pursuing, and its claims should therefore all be struck out.

b. The 1st Claimant’s claim against the 3rd Defendant (already dismissed by virtue of the reg.19 defence) should also be struck out as an abuse of process. In this decision I give particular weight to the 1st Claimant’s admissions and to his own active participation in most of the Amazon publications.

c. For the same reasons, the 1st Claimant’s claim against the 4th Defendant for damages in respect of his Amazon publications should be struck out.

d. In respect of the Dawkins website publications, there is no credible claim for damages, proportionate to the costs of the action, against any of the 1st, 2nd and 4thDefendants, particularly in the light of my rulings on meaning and the 1st Claimant’s admissions. The only surviving allegation is a relatively trivial one by comparison with what the Defendants will be able to prove against the Claimants.

e. The 1st Claimant has no credible claim against the 1st or 2nd Defendant for injunctive relief either, and the claim against them should therefore be struck out (upon the limited undertaking by the 2nd Defendant referred to above).

f. As indicated, the action will continue against the 4th Defendant for the purpose of injunctive relief, to the extent indicated above, [subject to satisfactory undertakings being offered], the balance of the claim against him being struck out.

 

**************************************************************************************

 

 


BAILII: Copyright Policy | Disclaimers | Privacy Policy | Feedback | Donate to BAILII
URL: http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWHC/QB/2012/B3.html

Cour d’appel de Paris Pôle 1, 2ème chambre Arrêt du 09 décembre 2009

Contenus illicites – moteur de recherche – trouble manifestement illicite – information

FAITS CONSTANTS

Le moteur de recherche gratuit “Google”, exploité par la société de droit californien Google Inc, est disponible à l’adresse www.google.fr.

La société Direct Energie est un fournisseur d’électricité.

Lors de la saisie du nom “Direct Energie” sur Google (16 février 2009) ce moteur de recherche suggérait en premier lieu “direct énergie arnaque”.

Par assignation du 26 mars 2009, Direct Energie assignait Google devant le juge des référés du Tribunal de commerce de Paris pour, sur le fondement de l’article 873 du Code de procédure civile, condamner Google à supprimer, le terme arnaque des suggestions proposées par le logiciel.

Par ordonnance contradictoire entreprise du 7 mai 2009, ce juge :

1 – ordonnait à Google de supprimer le terme “direct énergie arnaque” des suggestions proposées dans les 8 jours de la signification de l’ordonnance sous astreinte de 1000 € par infraction constatée ;

2 – se réservait la liquidation de l’astreinte ;

3 – rejetait la demande de dommages et intérêts.

Google interjetait appel le 15 juin 2009.

L’ordonnance de clôture était rendue le 24 novembre 2009.

L’ordonnance a été exécutée le 7 mai 2009.

PRETENTIONS ET MOYENS

De Google :

Par dernières conclusions en date du 18 novembre 2009, auxquelles il convient de se reporter, Google expose :

* que son service “suggestion de recherches” ou “Google suggest” s’explique concrètement de la façon suivante : “lorsque l’internaute commence à saisir les premières lettres ou les premiers mots d’une requête, il voit s’afficher en temps réel … la liste des 10 requêtes les plus populaires déjà tapées par les internautes qui commencent par ces mots ou ces lettres” ;

* que le trouble manifestement illicite doit être manifeste, c’est-à-dire violer les droits litigieux du requérant avec une particulière évidence ;

* que la suggestion “direct énergie arnaque” n’est pas perçue par les internautes comme une expression discréditante ;

* que les sites vers lesquels renvoie la requête “direct énergie arnaque” sont licites ;

* que la mesure porte une atteinte injustifiée à la liberté d’expression (article 10 de la Convention européenne des droits de l’homme) alors que :

  • l’affichage est porteur d’une information objective et potentiellement utile ;
  • l’affichage facilite l’accès à des sites licites ;
  • la mesure n’est pas limitée dans le temps.

* que la mention ne figure plus sur la liste des suggestions.

Après avoir répondu point par point aux moyens et arguments de Direct Energie, Google demande :

  • la réformation de l’ordonnance ;
  • subsidiairement, la limitation à 3 mois de la mesure ;
  • de débouter Direct Energie de ses demandes provisionnelles ;
  • 15 000 € au titre de l’article 700 du Code de procédure civile.

Cette partie entend bénéficier des dispositions de l’article 699 du CPC.

De Direct Energie :

Par dernières conclusions en date du 3 novembre 2009, auxquelles il convient de se reporter, Direct Energie expose :

* que “la défense de Google repose sur un postulat non démontré suivant lequel la suggestion litigieuse serait le résultat d’un calcul statistique fait à partir des 10 requêtes les plus populaires chez les internautes utilisant Google” ;

* que l’abstention de Google est constitutive d’une faute au sens des articles 1382, 1383 et subsidiairement de l’article 1384 alinéa 1 du Code civile, alors que Google possède la maîtrise de la solution logicielle comme l’exécution de l’ordonnance le démontre ;

* que le fait d’associer son nom à un comportement pénalement répréhensible constitue un trouble manifestement illicite ;

* que Google comme tout opérateur économique et, conformément aux principes de libre concurrence et de loyauté commerciale, a l’obligation de faire en sorte que son activité ne porte par préjudice aux tiers, peu important que la suggestion litigieuse soit ou non le résultat d’une réalité statistique objective ;

* qu’informée le 19 février 2009 du caractère préjudiciable des faits litigieux, Google ne s’est pas exécutée ;

* que la mesure ordonnée ne présente aucune atteinte à la liberté d’expression et qu’elle n’interdit pas à l’internaute d’accéder à des sites indexés par Google et dont le contenu comporterait cumulativement “arnaque” et “Direct énergie” ;

* que “rien n’interdit au juge des référés de prendre des mesures aux conséquences irréversibles, alors que le caractère provisoire de celles-ci n’est pas synonyme de temporaire.

Elle demande :

  • la confirmation des points 1 et 2 susvisés de l’ordonnance entreprise ;
  • de l’infirmer sur le point 3 et de condamner Google à lui verser une provision sur dommages et intérêts de 100 000 € ;
  • de condamner Google à supprimer dans les 3 jours et sous astreinte de la rubrique intitulée “requête apparentée à” le terme arnaque lors de la saisie du nom “Direct Energie” et lui payer une provision de 100 000 € à valoir sur son préjudice ;
  • 20 000 € au titre de l’article 700 du Code de procédure civile.

Cette partie entend bénéficier des dispositions de l’article 699 du cpc.

DISCUSSION

Considérant qu’il résulte de l’article 873 alinéa 1 du Code de procédure civile que le juge des référés du tribunal de commerce peut, même en présence d’une contestation sérieuse, prescrire en référé les mesures conservatoires ou de remise en état qui s’imposent pour faire cesser un trouble manifestement illicite ;

Considérant que depuis septembre 2008, Google propose un système dit “suggestions de recherche” défini (par elle) concrètement de la façon suivante : lorsque l’internaute commence à saisir les premières lettres ou les premiers mots d’une requête, il voit également s’afficher en temps réel à l’écran, en dessous du champ de saisie la liste des 10 requêtes les plus populaires déjà tapées par les internautes qui commencent par ces lettres ou mots” ;

Considérant que ce système est proposé d’office, ne pouvant être désactivé que par “deux clics”, le 1er sur “préférence”, le second sur “ne pas fournir de suggestion dans le champ de recherche” ;

Considérant qu’il n’est pas reproché au moteur de recherche de Google de renvoyez à une rubrique “direct énergie.arnaque”, mais de suggérer cette rubrique à l’utilisateur avant même que celui-ci n’ait saisi la totalité de la seule mention “direct énergie”, autrement dit avant même que l’on connaisse la réelle intention de l’utilisateur sur ce qu’il recherche (et qu’il n’aurait peut-être pas eu la volonté ou le désir de rechercher ledit site arnaque) ;

Considérant qu’il ne peut être sérieusement soutenu que le rapprochement dans une même expression du nom d’une société avec le mot arnaque qui signifie escroquer, voler, du verbe harnacher tromper pour voler, (autrement dit d’une expression qui associe un nom de société à un comportement pénalement répréhensible), ne porte pas atteinte à l’image et à la réputation de cette société, ledit rapprochement n’étant compris que dans le sens d’arnaque provenant de la société, et non pas au préjudice de celle-ci comme ne le conteste d’ailleurs pas Google (page 6 de ses conclusions) et comme tous les exemples cités par celle-ci le confirment ;

Considérant que rien ne permet de mettre en doute l’affirmation de Google, suivant laquelle les 10 suggestions litigieuses sont le résultat d’un calcul statistique automatique fait à partir des 10 requêtes les plus populaires – comprendre les plus souvent formulées – chez les internautes utilisant Google ;

Considérant en revanche, que contrairement à ce que soutient Google l’utilisateur moyen du moteur de recherche ne sait pas “parfaitement que Google suggest ne propose que des requêtes tapées avant lui par d’autre, internautes classés par ordre de popularité”, (page 9 de ses conclusions, Google limitant d’ailleurs à la même page son affirmation en ajoutant “si l’internaute possède une connaissance normale des principes élémentaires de la recherche sur … Google …”), comme la décision du premier juge le démontre (celui-ci ayant cru (par erreur) que le nombre figurant à côté de chaque proposition était le nombre de recherches, alors qu’il s’agit du nombre de réponses) et peut interpréter cette donnée “comme une information relative à la société Direct Energie” ou comme “une opinion, une critique, ou une proposition de Google” (page 9 de ses conclusions) ;

Considérant qu’une telle présentation de la suggestion litigieuse, sans avertissement préalable informant l’internaute du mode d’établissement de cette liste, fautive et engendrant évidemment un préjudice à ladite société, constitue un trouble manifestement illicite ; que pour se distraire de cette responsabilité Google ne peut :

  • alléguer la neutralité (par ailleurs réelle) du mode d’établissement automatique de cette liste, puisqu’elle est l’auteur du système, en contrôle le fonctionnement et en assure la diffusion ;
  • alléguer les conditions d’utilisation puisque celles-ci ne sont accessibles qu’à ceux qui opèrent une recherche délibérée (par deux “elles”, le premier sur “à propos de Google” sur la première page, puis un second sur “conditions d’utilisation” à la seconde page”) ;
  • soutenir que l’affichage de la requête “direct-énergie-arnaque” est porteuse d’une information objective et potentiellement utile puisque ledit affichage n’est pas remis en cause, seule l’étant la manière dont il est réalisé ;

Considérant que le juge doit, s’il envisage de faire cesser le trouble, limiter la mesure à celle strictement suffisante pour faire cesser celui-ci et bien sûr la moins attentatoire à la liberté d’expression ; qu’au vu de ce qui a été dit plus haut, il y a lieu de condamner Google à faire mention sur son écran d’entrée d’une information destinée à I’internaute et permettant à celui-ci de comprendre comment est établie la liste des suggestions ;

Que cette mesure est nécessaire à la protection des droits d’autrui ne constitue pas une atteinte injustifiée à la liberté d’expression au sens de l’article 10 de la Convention Européenne des Droits de l’Homme ;

Qu’il convient, par voie de conséquence, de réformer l’ordonnance entreprise ayant ordonné la suppression de l’expression Direct Energie – Arnaque, des suggestions proposées ; Considérant qu’au titre du préjudice subi par Direct Energie du 19 février 2009 au 7 mai 2009 (cf. : page 19 de ses conclusions) il y a lieu, en l’absence de toutes justifications sur celui-ci de confirmer l’ordonnance entreprise ;

Considérant qu’il serait inéquitable de laisser à la charge de Direct Energie les frais non compris dans les dépens ; qu’il y a lieu de lui accorder à ce titre la somme visée dans le dispositif ;

DECISION

Par ces motifs,

  • Réforme l’ordonnance entreprise en ce qu’elle a ordonné à Google de “supprimer les termes Direct Energie arnaque des suggestions proposées par le logiciel Google suggest”,

Statuant à nouveau sur ce point :

  • Condamne Google à mentionner dans sa page d’accueil et dans le système de “requêtes apparentées” un avertissement pouvant être bref mais suffisamment clair et lisible – précisant comment est établie la liste de ses 10 suggestions, si réapparaissait la mention “Direct énergie arnaque” dans les 10 suggestions, et ce dans les 8 jours de la signification du présent arrêt sous astreinte de 1000 € par infraction constatée,
  • Confirme l’ordonnance pour le surplus,
  • Condamne la société de droit américain Google Inc à payer à la société Direct Energie 1500 € au titre de l’article 700 du Code de procédure civile,
  • Condamne la société de droit américain Google Inc aux dépens d’appel qui pourront être recouvrés selon les dispositions de l’article 699 du Code de procédure civile.

La cour : M. Marcel Foulon (président), M. Renaud Blanquart et Mme Michèle Graff-Daudret (conseillers)

Avocats : Me Sébastien Proust, Me Damien Challamel

http://merlin.obs.coe.int/iris/2012/8/article23.en.html

Court of Cassation Considers “Google Suggest” Could Facilitate Infringement of Music Producers’ Rights

print add to caddie Word File PDF File

Amélie Blocman

Légipresse

 

In an important judgment delivered on 12 July 2012, the Court of Cassation found that the Google Suggest semi-automatic search tool made it possible to infringe copyright and/or neighbouring rights, by directing Internet users’ searches towards services that offer illegal downloading. In the case at issue, the French national syndicate of music producers (Syndicat National des Producteurs de Musique – SNEP) had noted that when an Internet user entered the name of a performer or an album in Google, the browser’s “Suggest” tool systematically associated the name with on-line services allowing piracy, such as Torrent, Megaupload and Rapidshare. Under the terms of Article L 336-2 of the Intellectual Property Code resulting from the HADOPI Act of 12 June 2009, “Where an infringement of copyright or a neighbouring right is caused by the content of an on-line service of communication to the public,… the regional court may order any measures such as to prevent or put an end to an infringement of the copyright or neighbouring right in respect of any person likely to contribute to remedying the situation” without taking into account any liability and without demanding that the measure should be totally effective. Deliberating under the urgent procedure, the initial court and the court of appeal in Paris had dismissed the applications for Google Suggest to be ordered to delete the terms Torrent, Megaupload and Rapidshare from its proposed suggestions. The court of appeal had noted that the illegal content was not accessible on the browser’s own site and held that the browser could not be held responsible for illegal downloading by Internet users. It had also found that deleting the suggestion would not in fact prevent illegal downloading. In a judgment delivered on 12 July, the Court of Cassation overturned the appeal judgment. It noted that the court of appeal had not drawn the correct conclusions from its findings. Firstly, by flagging key words that were suggested according to the number of searches, Google Suggest systematically directed Internet users towards illegal downloading sites, which meant that the tool provided the means of infringing copyright and neighbouring rights. The Court of Cassation also found that “the measures requested were aimed at preventing or putting an end to such infringement by stopping Google’s companies from automatically associating key words with the terms used in searches; the companies could thereby contribute to remedying the situation by making it more difficult to find illegal sites, although it was not possible to achieve total effectiveness.”

In its decision, the Court of Cassation considered that the browser’s function facilitated the infringement of music producers’ rights, and that the measure requested was such as to prevent or put a stop to such infringements, even if it was only partially effective. It should be recalled that Google has been filtering terms linked with piracy on its Suggest tool since the beginning of 2011.

 

Arrêt n° 832 du 12 juillet 2012 (11-20.358) – Cour de cassation – Première chambre civile – ECLI : FR : CCASS : 2012 : C100832

Cassation


Demandeur(s) : Le Syndicat national de l’édition phonographique

Défendeur(s) : La société Google France ; et autre


Sur le moyen unique, pris en ses deuxième et cinquième branches : 

Vu les articles L. 335 4 et L. 336 2 du code de la propriété intellectuelle ;

Attendu, selon l’arrêt attaqué, que le Syndicat national de l’édition phonographique (SNEP), qui représente, en France, des sociétés de l’industrie phonographique et regroupe des membres titulaires, sur leurs enregistrements, de droits voisins du droit d’auteur, en qualité de producteurs de phonogrammes et de cessionnaires de droits d’artistes interprètes, a fait constater par huissier de justice, en février et mars 2010, que la fonctionnalité Google Suggestions du moteur de rechercheGoogle, dont le principe est de proposer aux internautes des termes de recherche supplémentaires associés automatiquement à ceux de la requête initiale en fonction du nombre de saisies, suggérait systématiquement d’associer à la saisie de requêtes portant sur des noms d’artistes ou sur des titres de chansons ou d’albums les mots clés “Torrent”,“Megaupload” ou “Rapidshare”, qui sont, respectivement, le premier, un système d’échange de fichiers et, les deux autres, des sites d’hébergement de fichiers, offrant la mise à disposition au public et permettant le téléchargement des enregistrements de certains artistes interprètes ;

Attendu que pour débouter le SNEP de sa demande tendant à voir ordonner aux sociétés Google France et Google Inc la suppression des termes “Torrent”, “Megaupload” et “Rapidshare” des suggestions proposées sur le moteur de recherche à l’adresse www .google.com et, subsidiairement, à leur interdire de proposer sur ledit moteur de recherche des suggestions associant ces termes aux noms d’artistes et/ou aux titres d’albums ou de chansons, l’arrêt retient que la suggestion de ces sites ne constitue pas en elle même une atteinte au droit d’auteur dès lors que, d’une part, les fichiers figurant sur ceux ci ne sont pas tous nécessairement destinés à procéder à des téléchargements illégaux, qu’en effet, l’échange de fichiers contenant des oeuvres protégées notamment musicales sans autorisation ne rend pas ces sites en eux-mêmes illicites, que c’est l’utilisation qui en est faite par ceux qui y déposent des fichiers et les utilisent qui peut devenir illicite, que, d’autre part, la suggestion automatique de ces sites ne peut générer une atteinte à un droit d’auteur ou à un droit voisin que sil’internaute se rend sur le site suggéré et télécharge un phonogramme protégé et figurant en fichier sur ces sites, que les sociétés Google ne peuvent être tenues pour responsables du contenu éventuellement illicite des fichiers échangés figurant sur les sites incriminés ni des actes des internautes recourant au moteur de recherche, que le téléchargement de tels fichiers suppose un acte volontaire de l’internaute dont les sociétés Google ne peuvent être déclarées responsables, que, de plus, la suppression des termes “Torrent”, “Rapidshare” et “Megaupload” rend simplement moins facile la recherche de ces sites pour les internautes qui ne les connaîtraient pas encore et que le filtrage et la suppression de la suggestion ne sont pas de nature à empêcher le téléchargement illégal de phonogrammes ou d’oeuvres protégées par le SNEP dès lors qu’un tel téléchargement résulte d’un acte volontaire et réfléchi de l’internaute et que le contenu litigieux reste accessible en dépit de la suppression de la suggestion ;

Attendu qu’en se déterminant ainsi quand, d’une part, le service de communication au public en ligne des sociétés Googleorientait systématiquement les internautes, par l’apparition des mots clés suggérés en fonction du nombre de requêtes, vers des sites comportant des enregistrements mis à la disposition du public sans l’autorisation des artistes interprètes ou des producteurs de phonogrammes, de sorte que ce service offrait les moyens de porter atteinte aux droits des auteurs ou aux droits voisins, et quand, d’autre part, les mesures sollicitées tendaient à prévenir ou à faire cesser cette atteinte par la suppression de l’association automatique des mots clés avec les termes des requêtes, de la part des sociétés Google qui pouvaient ainsi contribuer à y remédier en rendant plus difficile la recherche des sites litigieux, sans, pour autant, qu’il y ait lieu d’en attendre une efficacité totale, la cour d’appel a violé les textes susvisés ;

PAR CES MOTIFS, et sans qu’il y ait lieu de statuer sur les autres branches du moyen :

CASSE ET ANNULE, dans toutes ses dispositions, l’arrêt rendu le 3 mai 2011, entre les parties, par la cour d’appel de Paris ; remet, en conséquence, la cause et les parties dans l’état où elles se trouvaient avant ledit arrêt et, pour être fait droit, les renvoie devant la cour d’appel de Versailles


Président : M. Charruault

Rapporteur : M. Gallet, conseiller

Avocat général : Mme Petit, premier avocat général

Avocat(s) : SCP Piwnica et Molinié ; Me Spinosi


Tribunal de grande instance de Paris 17ème chambre, Presse-civile Jugement du 14 novembre 2011

Olivier M. / Prisma Presse, Google

responsabilité – moteur de recherche – mots clés – suggestion – actif

FAITS ET PROCÉDURE

Vu l’assignation que, par actes en date des 26 et 27 juin 2008, Olivier M. a fait délivrer aux sociétés Prisma Presse, éditrice du site internet accessible à l’adresse www.gala.fr, et Google France, par laquelle il est demandé au tribunal :

  • à la suite de la mise en ligne, constatée le 19 mars 2008, sur le site internet susvisé, d’un article et de photographies que le requérant estime attentatoires au respect dû à sa vie privée et au droit qu’il détient sur sa propre image, ainsi que du renvoi à cet article, depuis le moteur de recherches de la société Google, par un lien commercial (service AdWords),
  • au visa des articles 9 et 1382 du Code civil,
  • la condamnation solidaire des sociétés assignées au paiement des sommes de 60 000 € à titre de dommages et intérêts, de 300 € au titre des frais d’un rapport Celog et de 8000 € sur le fondement des dispositions de l’article 700 du Code de procédure civile,
  • des publications judiciaires sous astreinte sur les sites internet accessibles aux adresseswww.gala.fr et www.google.fr ;

Vu le jugement de ce tribunal en date du 9 décembre 2009, ordonnant un sursis à statuer jusqu’aux décisions de la Cour de justice des communautés européennes saisie à la suite d’un renvoi préjudiciel de la Cour de cassation, par trois arrêts du 18 mai 2008 ;

Vu l’assignation délivrée à la requête d’Olivier M., à la société Google Ireland LTD le 3 novembre 2009, et tendant aux mêmes fins que celle délivrée à la société Google France, procédure enregistrée sous le numéro 09/16875 et jointe à la présente procédure le 13 octobre 2010 ;

Vu les conclusions signifiées le 17 avril 2009 par la SNC Prisma Presse faisant valoir l’absence de caractère fautif du lien hypertexte renvoyant à l’article litigieux et, s’agissant de celui-ci, l’absence de démonstration d’un préjudice, pour conclure au débouté des demandes et à la condamnation du demandeur à lui verser une somme de 2000 € ;

Vu les dernières conclusions des sociétés Google France et Google Ireland LTD déposées le 16 février 2011 par lesquelles il est demandé au tribunal :

  • de dire la demande irrecevable en ce qu’elle est dirigée contre la société Google France qui n’administre pas le service Adwords,
  • de constater que, selon l’arrêt rendu par la Cour de justice de l’Union Européenne, l’activité de la société Google Ireland dans le cadre de l’exploitation de ce service, est une activité de stockage au sens de l’article 6-I-2 de la loi du 21 juillet 2004 sur la confiance dans l’économie numérique et, qu’en conséquence, aucune responsabilité ne peut être recherchée à son égard dès lors qu’elle a retiré, dès que la demande lui en a été faite, les contenus litigieux,
  • subsidiairement que soit constaté que le demandeur ne rapporte la preuve d’aucun préjudice, en conséquence, le condamner, d’une part, à leur verser la somme de 10 000 € sur le fondement de l’article 700 du Code de procédure civile, d’autre part, au payement d’une amende civile au titre de la procédure abusive engagée à son encontre ;

Vu les dernières conclusions du demandeur, signifiées le 15 décembre 2010 par lesquelles il maintient l’intégralité de ses demandes à l’encontre des trois défenderesses et plus spécialement s’agissant des sociétés Google, il conteste l’interprétation que ces sociétés donnent de l’arrêt rendu par la Cour de justice de l’Union Européenne (CJUE) le 23 mars 2010, estimant qu’elles ne peuvent bénéficier en l’occurrence, du régime dérogatoire qu’elles revendiquent ;

DISCUSSION

Attendu qu’Olivier M. fonde sa demande sur le fait que, ainsi que cela a été constaté par le Celog (Centre d’expertises des logiciels), lorsqu’a été effectuée une recherche sur le moteur de recherche Google en écrivant ses nom et prénom, la première occurrence apparaissant à droite de l’écran sous l’intitulé : « liens commerciaux », était « News-Olivier M. Les chagrins d’amour les plus célèbres : le cas Olivier M. » suivi du nom du site www.gala.fr, et qu’en cliquant sur ce message, portant atteinte à sa vie privée, l’internaute était directement dirigé sur un article, illustré de deux clichés photographiques, publié sur le site gala.fr qu’il considère comme portant atteinte à sa vie privée et à son droit à l’image ; qu’il estime également que l’utilisation de son nom comme mot clé dans cette occurrence, était fautive ;

Sur la qualification de l’activité des sociétés Google dans le service Adwords

Attendu que le service payant Adwords proposé par Google, permet à un opérateur économique, ayant sélectionné un ou plusieurs mots clés de faire apparaître, lorsque la requête de l’internaute correspond aux mots clés sélectionnés, un lien promotionnel vers son site, accompagné d’un message, apparaissant dans une rubrique intitulée « liens commerciaux » qui est affichée, en principe, soit en partie droite de l’écran soit dans sa partie supérieure, au dessus des résultats dits “naturels”, la rémunération de ce service étant due par l’annonceur pour chaque clic réalisé sur ce lien ; que l’ordre d’affichage de ces liens commerciaux est déterminé par Google en fonction du prix maximal par clic, du nombre de clics antérieurs, ainsi que de la qualité de l’annonce telle qu’évaluée par Google ;

Attendu que dans son arrêt rendu le 23 mars 2010 la Cour de justice de l’Union Européenne, saisie de trois questions préjudicielles posées par la Cour de cassation, s’est penchée sur la responsabilité du service de référencement au regard des dispositions de l’article 14 de la directive 2000/31 qui prévoit une limitation de responsabilité d’un « service de l’information consistant à stocker des informations fournies par un destinataire du service » n’effectuant qu’un simple « hébergement » ; que la Cour a considéré dans le point 113 de cet arrêt qu’il découlait du « quarante-deuxième considérant de la directive 2000/31, que les dérogations en matière de responsabilités prévues par cette directive ne couvrent que les cas où l’activité du prestataire est neutre, en ce que son comportement est “purement technique, automatique et passif”, impliquant que ledit prestataire “n’a pas la connaissance ou de contrôle des informations transmises ou stockées” » ;

Attendu qu’il convient, en premier lieu, de relever que les arrêts de la Cour de justice de l’Union Européenne saisie par la voie d’une question préjudicielle, n’ont qu’une autorité relative de la chose jugée mais que les juges nationaux doivent, dans un souci de sécurité juridique, tenter de se conformer aux décisions de cette juridiction dont la charge est, selon l’article 19 du Traité de l’Union, d’assurer « le respect du droit dans l’interprétation et l’application des traités » ;

Attendu qu’en l’espèce, les parties divergent sur le sens qu’il convient de donner à cet arrêt du 23 mars 2010 ; que les sociétés Google estiment qu’il « est désormais établi en droit que lorsque Google, au travers de son service AdWords, assure le stockage de contenus à la demande de tiers, afin que ce contenu soit ultérieurement diffusé au public, il bénéficie de la qualité d’hébergeur », tandis qu’Olivier M. soutient « qu’il est parfaitement faux d’affirmer, comme le fait la société Google dans ses écritures, qu’aux termes de cet arrêt elle bénéficierait du régime aménagé de responsabilité des hébergeurs » ;

Attendu qu’après avoir relevé les conditions, posées par l’article 14 de la directive précitée, pour qu’un prestataire de service de la société de l’information puisse bénéficier du régime de limitation de responsabilité qu’il prévoit, à la lumière, notamment, du « quarante-deuxième considérant de la directive 2000/31 ayant précisé que les dérogations en matière de responsabilité prévues par cette directive ne couvrent que les cas où l’activité du prestataire de services (…) revêt un caractère “purement technique, automatique et passif “, impliquant que ledit prestataire “n’a pas la connaissance ni le contrôle des informations transmises ou stockées” », la Cour a souligné que « la seule circonstance que le service de référencement soit payant, que Google fixe les modalités de rémunération, ou encore qu’elle donne des renseignements d’ordre général à ses clients, ne saurait avoir pour effet de priver Google des dérogations en matière de responsabilité prévues par la directive 2000/31 » ; qu’elle a également relevé que « la concordance entre le mot sélectionné et le terme de recherche introduit par un internaute ne suffit pas en soi pour considérer que Google a une connaissance ou un contrôle des données introduites dans son système par les annonceurs et mises en mémoire sur son serveur » ; que la Cour a en revanche jugé pertinent « le rôle joué par Google dans la rédaction du message commercial accompagnant le lien promotionnel ou dans l’établissement ou la sélection des mots clés » jugeant enfin que « c’est eu égard aux considérations qui précèdent qu’il appartient à la juridiction nationale, qui est la mieux à même de connaître les modalités concrètes de la fourniture de service dans les affaires au principal, d’apprécier si le rôle ainsi exercé par Google correspond à celui décrit au point 114 du présent arrêt » ;

Attendu, si l’on suit l’interprétation donnée par cet arrêt de l’article 14 de la directive 2000/31, que le juge national doit vérifier, ainsi que le précise ce point 114, « si le rôle exercé par ledit prestataire est neutre, en ce que son comportement est purement technique, automatique et passif, impliquant l’absence de connaissance ou de contrôle des données qu’il stocke » ;

Attendu à cet égard qu’il convient de relever que le service Adwords est présenté comme « le programme de publicité en ligne de Google », que ce service propose, moyennant rémunération, de faire apparaître un message publicitaire déterminé, dans un positionnement plus favorable que celui qui serait obtenu sans recourir à ce service, c’est-à-dire en principe sur la première page des résultats de la recherche lorsqu’un internaute inscrit comme objet de sa recherche, un des mots clés sélectionné comme pertinent ;

Attendu que la modification de l’ordre d’apparition des annonces caractérise déjà un rôle actif, qui ne saurait être assimilé à ce qui est décrit par le considérant 42 de la directive 2000/31, à savoir une activité qui « revêt un caractère purement technique, automatique et passif, qui implique que le prestataire de services de la société de l’information n’a pas la connaissance ni le contrôle des informations transmises ou stockées », que ce rôle est non négligeable compte tenu de l’importance pour un annonceur de figurer en page une des résultats plutôt qu’en page cent ;

Attendu de surcroît que la connaissance par le service Adwords des informations traitées, comme le rôle actif des sociétés Google dans le système Adwords, résultent des « conditions générales des services de publicité » produites par les sociétés Google (pièce nE3) ; que l’article 4.2 de ces conditions générales prévoit en effet que « dans le cadre du programme AdWords, Google peut exiger que le client lui indique ses messages publicitaires au moins 3 jours avant la date de début prévue », ce qui implique la connaissance par Google, avant le début de la diffusion du message publicitaire, de son contenu ; que l’article 4.3 stipule que « le positionnement des publicités [est] à la discrétion de Google », le terme de « discrétion » utilisé signifie que Google exerce, sur ce positionnement, un entier pouvoir ; que l’article 4.4 prévoit que « Google, peut, lors de la mise en ligne d’une campagne, adresser un courrier électronique au client l’informant qu’il dispose de 72 heures pour apporter d’éventuelles corrections ou modifications à ses mots clés », ce dont il se déduit que Google a connaissance du message publicitaire et a la possibilité de le contrôler ; que ce pouvoir de contrôle est d’ailleurs expressément prévu par l’article 4.5 de ces conditions générales qui prévoit la possibilité pour Google de « rejeter ou de retirer toutes publicités, messages publicitaires et/ou cible quelle qu’en soit la raison », stipulation qui établit l’existence du contrôle des messages que Google se réserve et donc de son rôle actif ; qu’en outre ces conditions générales prévoient dans leur article 4.6 que « Le client autorise Google à utiliser des programmes informatiques pour rechercher et analyser automatiquement les sites internet de l’annonceur afin d’évaluer la pertinence des publicités », ce qui là encore, démontre le rôle actif de Google dans cette activité d’annonceur puisqu’elle évalue la pertinence des publicités qu’elle publie ;

Attendu enfin que si la Cour de justice de l’Union Européenne a estimé, au point 116 de son arrêt, que la circonstance que Google « donne des renseignements d’ordre général à ses clients » ne saurait la priver des dérogations en matière de responsabilité prévues par la directive 2000/31, il en va différemment si, comme cela résulte de l’article 15 des « conditions générales » précitées, « les FAQs [cet acronyme désigne, selon la définition donnée par l’article 1 : la foire aux questions relative au programme (notamment, les FAQs relatives aux règles éditoriales…] et les consignes de rédaction font partie intégrante du présent contrat et y sont incorporées par référence », ce qui confère à ces « règles éditoriales » et à ces « consignes de rédaction » non pas la qualité de « renseignements d’ordre général » mais un caractère contractuel, et donc contraignant, qui démontre le rôle actif de Google dans la rédaction des annonces, puisque l’annonceur est dans l’obligation de respecter ces « règles éditoriales » et « consignes de rédaction » de Google ;

Attendu en conséquence, compte tenu de la connaissance avérée par le responsable du service Adwords, du contenu des messages et mots clés, comme de la maîtrise éditoriale qui lui est contractuellement réservée, qu’il convient d’exclure à son égard la qualification d’hébergeur et le bénéfice de dérogations de responsabilité qui lui est réservé ;

Sur la demande de mise hors de cause de la société Google France

Attendu que la société Google France soutient que seul Google Ireland gère le programme Adwords et est seule en contact direct avec les clients, les assiste et facture le service, et qu’en conséquence elle ne peut être attraite dans un litige lié au fonctionnement de ce programme ;

Attendu cependant que ces affirmations sont contredites par le courrier qui a été adressé par Google France, à l’avocat du demandeur le 25 mars 2008, en réponse à sa réclamation ; que dans ce courrier il est indiqué que Google Ireland Ltd gère le programme Adwords, mais que celle-ci a demandé à Google France de répondre à la réclamation d’Olivier M., ce qui implique que Google France s’occupe effectivement de ce programme ; qu’en outre, l’auteur de cette lettre, écrivant au nom de Google France, indique les mesures prises en employant la première personne du pluriel ; que ce courrier démontre que Google France se comporte et apparaît comme responsable sur le territoire français de ce programme Adwords, ayant le pouvoir de supprimer des annonces, que le demandeur établit en outre que des publicités pour le programme Adwords mentionnent le nom de Google France ;

Que ces éléments sont corroborés par l’extrait Kbis de la société Google France qui révèle que, parmi ses activités figurent : « la fourniture de services et/ou conseils relatifs aux logiciels, au réseau internet, aux réseaux télématiques ou en ligne, notamment l’intermédiation en matière de vente de publicité en ligne, la promotion sous toutes ses formes de la publicité en ligne, la promotion directe de produits et services et la mise en œuvre de centres de traitement de l’information », ce qui correspond à l’activité pour laquelle elle apparaît en l’espèce, comme une des responsables ;

Que sa demande de mise hors de cause sera donc rejetée ;

Sur les atteintes alléguées

Attendu que le demandeur soutient que l’annonce « News-Olivier M. Les chagrins d’amour les plus célèbres : le cas Olivier M. » suivie du nom du site « www.gala.fr » obtenu en inscrivant ses nom et prénom sur le moteur de recherche de Google, comme l’article et les clichés photographiques mis en ligne sur ce site gala.fr auquel on accède en cliquant sur ce message, portent atteinte à sa vie privée, à son droit à l’image et à son droit au nom ;

  • Sur les atteintes au droit à la vie privée et à l’image

Attendu que la société Prisma Presse soutient que le message publicitaire figurant sur les résultats du moteur de recherche est insuffisamment précis pour pouvoir constituer par lui-même une faute, que s’agissant de l’article et des clichés photographiques, elle conteste les atteintes alléguées faisant valoir qu’il s’agit de faits notoires et que les petites photographies publiées n’ont pas été réalisées pour les besoins de cet article ;

Attendu que l’article 9 du Code civil prévoit que toute personne, quelle que soit sa notoriété, a droit au respect de sa vie privée et est fondée à en obtenir la protection ; que de même, elle dispose, en principe, sur son image, attribut de sa personnalité, et sur l’utilisation qui en est faite d’un droit distinct, qui lui permet de s’opposer à sa diffusion sans son autorisation ;

Attendu que la vie sentimentale fait partie de la sphère protégée de la vie privée ; que tant le message de l’annonce « Olivier M. Les chagrins d’amour les plus célèbres : le cas Olivier M. » , que l’article lui-même figurant sur le site gala.fr intitulé « Olivier M. : Je t’aime moi non plus » et introduit par « Voila un homme qui ne sait pas ce qu’il veut ! » consacré à la supposée fin de la relation sentimentale du demandeur avec Kilie M. ainsi qu’à « Des rumeurs de liaison [qui] commencent à courir sur Olivier et l’actrice Michelle R. … », l’auteur de l’article brodant sur les sentiments du demandeur, sa jalousie, son désir de mariage ou de paternité, portent atteinte à sa vie privée ;

Que cet article est illustré de deux clichés photographiques représentant le demandeur, l’un sur un voilier, manifestement pris sans son autorisation lors d’un moment de loisir, l’autre en compagnie d’une jeune femme, qui aurait été pris lors d’une manifestation officielle, mais reproduit sans son autorisation, détourné de son contexte, et illustrant un écrit illicite ;

Que l’atteinte au droit à l’image est également caractérisée ;

  • Sur l’atteinte au droit au nom

Attendu que le demandeur invoque le droit dont il dispose sur son nom et son prénom, pour contester aux sociétés défenderesses la possibilité de les utiliser comme mot clé servant de lien à une annonce commerciale pour un article illicite ;

Attendu que le droit dont dispose un individu sur son nom ne permet, en règle générale, que de s’opposer à une utilisation de ces éléments d’identification de la personne qui serait source de confusion ; qu’en conséquence, et en principe, si la simple utilisation d’un nom comme mot clé d’un moteur de recherche agissant de façon qualifiée de « naturelle » peut ne pas être considérée comme fautive, il en va différemment lorsque le nom d’un tiers est sciemment choisi et utilisé comme un mot clé pertinent, renvoyant à un article illicite ;

Que c’est donc la pertinence du nom du demandeur comme mot clé conduisant à un tel article qui sera considérée comme fautive ;

Que cette faute est imputable aux sociétés Prisma Presse, Google France et Google Ireland, lesquelles comme cela a été précédemment relevé, ont eu un rôle actif dans la réalisation de cette faute et ont eu connaissance de ce mot clé et du contenu du message publicitaire, dont la teneur était attentatoire à la vie privée, qui figurait sur la première page de résultats du moteur de recherche et permettait d’accéder directement à l’article illicite ;

Sur les demandes de réparation du préjudice

Attendu qu’il résulte des pièces justificatives versées aux débats par les sociétés défenderesses que l’annonce et l’article litigieux ont été retirés du site de Google et de celui de Gala quelques jours après la réclamation formulée par les conseils d’Olivier M. ; que compte tenu de cet élément le préjudice est modéré et sera justement réparé par l’allocation d’une somme de 1500 € à titre de dommages-intérêts, la mesure de réparation complémentaire consistant en une publication judiciaire n’apparaissant pas nécessaire compte tenu des circonstances de la cause ;

Attendu que l’équité commande également que soit accordé à Olivier M. le remboursement, à hauteur de 3000 €, des frais irrépétibles qu’il a dû engager et qui comprendront les frais exposés pour faire établir un constat du Celog ;

DECISION

Le tribunal, statuant publiquement par mise à disposition au greffe, contradictoirement et en premier ressort,

. Rejette la demande de mise hors de cause de la société Google France ;

. Rejette les prétentions des sociétés Google France et Google Ireland limited tendant à bénéficier des dispositions dérogatoires de responsabilité prévues par l’article 14 de la directive UE 2000/31 et l’article 6-I-2 de la loi du 21 juillet 2004 ;

. Constate le caractère fautif de la publication sur le site internet google.fr de l’annonce « Olivier M. Les chagrins d’amour les plus célèbres : le cas Olivier M. » accessible à partir du mot clé constitué des nom et prénom du demandeur ;

. Constate le caractère fautif de la publication sur le site internet gala.fr de l’article intitulé « Olivier M. : Je t’aime moi non plus » et des deux clichés photographiques illustrant cet article ;

. Condamne in solidum la SNC Prisma Presse, la société Google France et la société de droit irlandais Google Ireland Limited, à payer à Olivier M. les sommes de 1500 € à titre de dommages-intérêts et de 3000 € en application de l’article 700 du Code de procédure civile, en ce compris les frais de constat,

. Déboute les parties du surplus de leurs demandes,

. Condamne la SNC Prisma Presse, la société Google France et la société de droit irlandais Google Ireland Limited, aux dépens dont distraction au profit de maître Emmanuel Asmar, conformément aux dispositions de l’article 699 du Code de procédure civile.

Le tribunal : Mme Anne-Marie Sauteraud (vice présidente), Mme Marie Mongin (vice présidente), M. Alain Bourla (premier-juge)

Avocats : Me Emmanuel Asmar, SCP D’Antin-Brossollet, Me Marion Barbier

Tribunal de grande instance de Paris 17ème chambre presse-civile Jugement du 18 mai 2011

Lyonnaise de garantie / Google France, Google Inc, Eric S.

contenus illicites

FAITS ET PROCEDURE

Vu l’assignation à jour fixe que la société Lyonnaise de garantie a fait délivrer, par acte en date du 21 janvier 2011, après y avoir été autorisée par décision prise sur délégation du président du tribunal, à la société Google France, à la société de droit californien Google Inc, et à Eric S., en sa qualité de Chief Executive Officer de cette dernière :

  • exposant que le moteur de recherche Google offre depuis septembre 2008 une fonctionnalité dénommée “Google Suggest” qui propose aux internautes qui effectuent une recherche, à partir des premières lettres du mot qu’ils ont saisies, un menu déroulant de propositions qui comporte une liste de requêtes possibles les dispensant d’avoir à taper le libellé complet de leur recherche,
  • ajoutant avoir constaté par huissier le 7 décembre 2010 que la saisie sur le moteur de recherche Google des lettres “Lyonnaise de g”, fait apparaître la suggestion “lyonnaise de garantie escroc“, au troisième rang des trois suggestions de recherche alors proposées aux internautes, et ce sur le moteur accessible aux adresses google.fr (France), google.be (Belgique), google.uk (Royaume-Uni), google.es (Espagne), google.it (Italie), google.ca (Canada),
  • soutenant que l’association de ces mots constitue une injure publique envers un particulier, quelque soit le contenu des articles ou documents auxquels lesdites requêtes renvoient,
  • faisant valoir avoir adressé en vain plusieurs mises en demeure aux sociétés Google Inc et Google France, auxquelles il fut répondu par des fins de non-recevoir au motif que les suggestions de recherche proposées aux internautes résultaient d’un système automatisé depuis une base de données recensant les libellés de recherche les plus fréquemment utilisés par les internautes,
  • sollicitant au visa des articles 29, alinéa 2, 33, alinéa 2, de la loi du 29 juillet 1881, pris ensemble, les articles 93-2 et 93-3 de la loi du 29 juillet 1982
  • (1) que soit ordonnée la suppression de ces termes dans les suggestions de recherche proposées par Google en France, Belgique, Royaume-Uni, Espagne, Italie et Canada, où ils apparaissent, sous astreinte de 5000 € par infraction constatée, dans un délai de deux jours à compter de la signification du jugement,
  • (2) la condamnation in solidum d’Eric S. en sa qualité de directeur de publication, et de la société Google Inc à lui verser la somme de 50 000 € à titre de dommages et intérêts en réparation du préjudice subi,
  • (3) une mesure de publication judiciaire pendant sept jours consécutifs la page d’accueil du sitewww.google.fr, sous astreinte de 5000 € par jour de retard,
  • (4) ainsi que dans un quotidien national français et un périodique non quotidien national français de son choix, sous la limite d’une somme de 10 000 € par insertion,
  • (5) outre une indemnité de 8000 € sur le fondement de l’article 700 du code de procédure civile, laquelle a été portée à la somme de 12 000 € dans ses dernières conclusions du 16 mars 2011,
  • (6) le tout sous le bénéfice de l’exécution provisoire,

Vu les écritures en défense des sociétés Google Inc et de Eric S. et semble-t-il Google France, pour laquelle le même conseil est constitué et qui forme elle-même une demande en son nom propre, qui concluent au débouté aux motifs :

  • que l’affichage de l’expression litigieuse ne saurait caractériser une injure publique n’étant pas le fait d’une personne physique mais d’un traitement de données, et en tout étant de cause, n’étant pas le fait de la pensée consciente mais un résultat d’algorithme,
  • que cet affichage n’exprime rien d’autre que la fréquence des recherches entreprises par les internautes à partir du moteur de recherche Google sur de tels mots,
  • qu’il n’exprime rien en lui-même, étant dépourvu de toute signification sémantique, ce dont les internautes sont informés par une rubrique “En savoir plus” relative au fonctionnement de la saisie semi automatique,
  • qu’Eric S. ne saurait voir sa responsabilité recherchée, en sa qualité de directeur de publication, celle-ci n’étant pas de plein droit s’agissant d’une société établie hors du territoire français, et faute de fixation préalable du message en cause,
  • qu’en l’absence de faute de sa part, la société Google Inc devrait, elle-même, être mise hors de cause,
  • contestant subsidiairement tout préjudice et le caractère proportionné des mesures de réparation sollicitées,
  • sollicitant enfin la condamnation de la société demanderesse à payer une somme de 25 000 € à la société Google Inc et celle de 1000 € à la société Google France, sur le fondement de l’article 700 du code de procédure civile,

DISCUSSION

La société Google Inc a complété, en septembre 2008, son moteur de recherche accessible en France à l’adresse www.google.fr par une fonctionnalité, dite “Google Suggest” qui offre aux internautes effectuant une recherche, à partir des premières lettres du mot qu’ils saisissent, un menu déroulant de propositions qui comporte une liste de requêtes possibles, un simple “clic” sur la requête proposée les dispensant, le cas échéant, d’avoir à taper le libellé complet de leur recherche.

A la suite de divers contentieux nés, selon les sociétés Google, du quiproquo que pouvait susciter la dénomination d’une telle fonctionnalité, ce service répond désormais à l’appellation “Prévisions de recherche”. Il est présenté comme un service de “saisie semi automatique” qui permet aux utilisateurs de “profiter de l’expérience des autres utilisateurs”, en portant à leur connaissance les requêtes “les plus populaires déjà tapées par les internautes qui commencent par ces lettres ou mots“.

La société Lyonnaise de garantie qui exerce une activité d’agence et de courtage d’assurance à destination des professionnels de l’immobilier, et offre, selon la société Google Inc. diverses prestations de garantie de revenus locatifs dans le cadre de dispositifs de défiscalisation (type “Robien” ou “Borloo”) a constaté en octobre 2010, puis fait constater par huissier le 7 décembre 2010, que la saisie sur le moteur de recherche Google des lettres “Lyonnaise de g”, faisait apparaître la suggestion “lyonnaise de garantie escroc”, au troisième rang des trois suggestions de recherche alors proposées aux internautes, et ce sur le moteur accessible aux adresses google.fr (France), google.be (Belgique), google.uk (Royaume-Uni), google.es (Espagne), google.it (Italie), google.ca ( Canada).

La société demanderesse se plaint de s’être heurtée à une fin de non-recevoir lorsqu’elle a sollicité les sociétés Google, par lettre recommandé avec avis de réception du 28 octobre 2010, la suppression de ces propositions de recherche dont elle estime qu’elles constituent des injures publiques envers un particulier.

Eric S. et la société Google Inc produisent une attestation de David K., responsable de la base de données, indiquant :

  • que ce service fonctionne de manière purement automatique à partir d’une base de données qui recense les requêtes effectivement saisies sur Google au cours de la période récente par un nombre minimum d’internautes ayant les mêmes préférences linguistiques et territoriales,
  • que les résultats affichés dépendent d’un algorithme basé sur les recherches des autres utilisateurs sans aucune intervention humaine ou reclassification de ces résultats par Google,
  • que l’ordre des requêtes est entièrement déterminé par le nombre d’internautes ayant utilisé chacune des requêtes, la plus fréquente apparaissant en tête de liste.

Les défendeurs soulignent en outre qu’une rubrique accessible sous la fenêtre “En savoir plus” de la page d’accueil du moteur de recherche précise s‘agissant de ce qu’elle dénomme désormais “le fonctionnement de la saisie semi-automatique” : “A mesure que vous saisissez vos termes de recherche, l’algorithme Google prédit et affiche des requêtes basées sur les activités de recherche des autres internautes. Ces recherches sont déterminées, par le biais d’un algorithme, en fonction d’un certain nombre de facteurs purement objectifs (dont la popularité des termes de recherche), sans intervention humaine. Toutes les requêtes de prédiction affichées ont été déjà saisies par le passé par d’autres utilisateurs de Google. La base de données de la saisie semi automatique Google est régulièrement mise à jour afin de proposer les dernières requêtes du moment “.

Ils en infèrent, pour l’essentiel, que le caractère essentiellement technique et mathématique des procédés utilisés pour proposer de telles suggestions de recherche aux internautes ne saurait en rien engager leur responsabilité, que les libellés litigieux sont dépourvus de signification intrinsèque, indiquant seulement, comme les internautes ne peuvent manquer de le savoir, que les mots associés se trouvent dans un même texte auquel le moteur de recherche renvoie, et que seule l’actualité éditoriale ou médiatique relative à la société demanderesse explique l’affichage du résultat contesté, dont ils soulignent en outre le caractère sinon éphémère du moins provisoire, dès lors qu’ils sont indexés sur la curiosité par nature instable de la communauté humaine.

Considérations générales relativement aux enjeux de la fonctionnalité en litige

Il sera relevé au préalable sur l’argumentaire technique des défendeurs :

  • que les algorithmes ou les solutions logicielles procèdent de l’esprit humain avant que d’être mis en œuvre,
  • que les défendeurs ne produisent aucune pièce -autre que l’attestation de leur préposé David K.- établissant que les suggestions faites aux internautes procéderaient effectivement, comme ils le soutiennent, des chiffres bruts des requêtes antérieurement saisies sur le même thème, sans intervention humaine,
  • que loin de la neutralité technologique prétendue dudit service – peu important à cet égard que son ancienne appellation de “Suggestions de recherche” ait été abandonnée pour celle, moins explicite, de “Prévisions de recherche”, encore traduite en volapuk technique sous la forme “service de saisie semi-automatique”-, l’item litigieux, qui n’est nullement saisi par l’internaute mais apparaît spontanément à la saisie des premières lettres de sa recherche comme une proposition de recherche possible, est incontestablement de nature à orienter la curiosité ou à appeler l’attention sur le thème proposé, et, ce faisant, de nature à provoquer un “effet boule de neige” d’autant plus préjudiciable à qui en fait l’objet que le libellé le plus accrocheur se retrouvera ainsi plus rapidement en tête de liste des recherches proposées,
  • qu’au regard de ces considérations d’ordre général, il doit être relevé que tous les libellés de recherches lancées par les internautes ne sont pas pris en compte par le moteur de recherche Google dans le souci, notamment, d’éviter les suggestions “qui pourraient offenser un grand nombre d’utilisateurs” tels que “les termes grossiers”- comme il est précisé dans le jugement, versé aux présents débats par la société demanderesses, rendu par cette même chambre le 4 décembre 2009, sur la foi d’une note alors produite par la société Google Inc-, ce qui suppose nécessairement qu’un tri préalable soit fait entre les requêtes enregistrées clans la base de données,
  • que de même, le site google.fr invitait les internautes – comme l’a retenu cette chambre dans le même jugement du 4 décembre 2009- à signaler “des requêtes qui ne devraient pas être suggérées“, de sorte que le tribunal est fondé à comprendre qu’une intervention humaine est possible, propre à rectifier des suggestions jusqu’alors proposées,
  • que si cette note n’est plus produite par les sociétés défenderesses dans le cadre de la présente instance, une notice depuis lors actualisée et moins explicite paraissant y avoir été substituée, cette dernière explique encore à la question “Est-ce que Google exclut de Google Suggest certaines requêtes d’utilisateurs ?”, la réponse suivante : “[…] Nous appliquons également un ensemble restreint de politiques de suppression en ce qui concerne la pornographie, la violence et la haine“, ce qui confirme la possibilité au moins a posteriori d’une intervention humaine propre à éviter les dommages les plus évidents liés aux fonctionnalités en cause,
  • que les défendeurs ne sauraient sérieusement invoquer l’atteinte à la liberté d’expression que constituerait en elle-même l’intervention judiciaire visant, dans les cas et aux conditions prévues par la loi, à rétablir un particulier dans ses droits en ordonnant, le cas échéant, la suppression de telle association de mots ou expressions avec son nom, alors que le service offert par Google a pour seule utilité d’éviter aux internautes d’avoir à saisir sur leur ordinateur l’entier libellé de leur requête de sorte que la suppression éventuelle de tel ou tel des thèmes de recherche proposés ne priverait aucun d’entre eux de la faculté de disposer, mais à leur seule initiative et sans y être incité par quiconque, de toutes les références indexées par le moteur de recherches correspondant à telle association de mots, patronymes ou raison sociale de leur choix,
  • que dans le cas d’espèce, la société demanderesse a adressé une mise en demeure à la société Google Inc et à la société Google France pour appeler leur attention sur la suggestion et proposition litigieuses, qui ont reçu une réponse en forme de fin de non-recevoir, ce qui atteste que les responsables du moteur de recherche Google n’ignoraient plus la situation dénoncée par elle à compter du 28 octobre 2010 – date de la dernière mise en demeure.

C’est au regard de ces considérations générales que seront appréciées le mérite des demandes.

Sur le caractère injurieux des propos incriminés

Il sera rappelé que l’article 29 de la loi du 29 juillet 1881 définit l’injure comme “toute expression outrageante, termes de mépris ou invective qui ne referme l’imputation d’aucun fait”, tandis que la diffamation consiste en l’allégation ou l’imputation d’un fait précis qui porte atteinte à l’honneur ou à la considération de la personne visée. Faute de toute précision complémentaire et n’étant pas autrement circonstancié, le qualificatif “escroc” constitue une invective et caractérise, en tout état de cause, un propos outrageant.

Il sera relevé en outre, quelque automatique que soit, le cas échéant, le thème de recherche proposé par Google, qu’après la mise en demeure adressée par le conseil de la société demanderesse le 28 octobre 2010, les défendeurs avaient la parfaite conscience que la fonctionnalité proposait, sur l’interrogation “Lyonnaise de Garantie”, la réponse “lyonnaise de garantie escroc”.

Enfin, les défendeurs ne sauraient utilement soutenir qu’une telle expression ne saurait être lue indépendamment des articles auxquels elle renvoie alors que les internautes qui ne l’ont pas sollicitée, la voient s’afficher sous leurs yeux et peuvent ne pas se connecter aux sites indexés, ayant seulement retenu ce qu’elle indiquait et signifiait, de sorte que, telles les manchettes d’une couverture de magazine affichée en kiosque dont il est de jurisprudence constante qu’elles se lisent indépendamment des articles auxquels elles renvoient en pages intérieures, l’affichage d’une suggestion de recherche non sollicitée doit se lire indépendamment des sites indexés par le moteur de recherche, auxquels l‘internaute peut ne pas se connecter.

Pour l’ensemble de ces motifs, le délit d’injure publique sera regardé comme caractérisé en l’espèce.

Sur la responsabilité d‘Eric S. en sa qualité de directeur de publication

C’est à tort qu’Eric S., qui ne conteste pas sa qualité de représentant légal de la société Google Inc. fait valoir que sa responsabilité ne saurait être engagée, faute pour le propos en cause d’avoir fait l’objet d’une fixation préalable au sens de l’article 93-3 de la loi du 29 juillet 1982, alors que les défendeurs reconnaissent que les suggestions proposées aux internautes procèdent d’eux mêmes et de nul autre, à partir d’une base de données qu’ils ont précisément constituée pour ce faire, lui appliquant des algorithmes de leur fabrication et que le système mis en place a précisément pour vocation d’anticiper les éventuelle requêtes des internautes.

La responsabilité de la société Google Inc sera de même retenue en sa qualité de civilement responsable, étant relevé par ailleurs qu’il est admis qu’une action civile en réparation d’un délit de presse soit recevable même lorsqu’elle est engagée à l’encontre de la seule société civilement responsable. Il sera noté à toutes fins que la mise hors de cause de la société Google France n’est pas sollicitée.

Sur les mesures de réparation

Il sera fait droit à la demande de suppression de la suggestion litigieuse sous une astreinte de 2500 € par manquement constaté et par jour, à l’expiration d’un délai d’un mois courant à compter de la signification de la présente décision.

La mesure de publication judiciaire sur la page d’accueil du site google.fr ou dans d’autre publications de presse excéderait ce que commande le souci d’une juste réparation, au regard des faits de la cause, la fonctionnalité litigieuse n’étant nullement illicite en elle-même mais de nature, dans le cas d’espèce, à caractériser une atteinte aux droits de la demanderesse.

Il sera alloué un euro à titre de dommages intérêts à la société Lyonnaise de garantie.

Il sera alloué une somme de 5000 € à la société demanderesse sur le fondement de l’article 700 du code de procédure civile.

L’exécution provisoire, compatible avec la nature du litige, sera prononcée.

DECISION

Statuant publiquement, par décision contradictoire mise à disposition au greffe et en premier ressort,

. Donnons acte aux défendeurs qu’ils renoncent au moyen de nullité tiré de l’absence de notification de l’assignation au ministère public, celle-ci ayant été notifiée dans les formes et délai prévu par l’article 53 de la loi du 29 juillet 1881,

. Ordonne à Eric S., en sa qualité de directeur de publication, et à la société Google Inc. en sa qualité de civilement responsable, des sites internet accessibles aux adresses www.google.fr(France), google.be (Belgique), google.uk (Royaume-Uni), google.es (Espagne), google.it (Italie), google.ca (Canada), de prendre toute mesure pour supprimer des suggestions apparaissant sur le service “Prévisions de recherche” ou “service de saisie semi-automatique“, à la saisie sur le moteur de recherche Google par les internautes des lettres “lyonnaise de g” ou “lyonnaise de garantie”, l’expression” lyonnaise de garantie escroc”, et ce dans un délai d’un mois à compter de la signification de la présente décision sous une astreinte de 2500 € par jour et par site concerné visé par cette décision (.fr ; .es. ; .uk ; etc.), à l’expiration d’un délai d’un mois courant à compter de la signification de la présente décision,

. Déclare la société Google Inc civilement responsable in solidum avec Eric S. de l’exécution de cette injonction de faire sous astreinte,

. Se réserve la liquidation de l’astreinte,

. Condamne in solidum Eric S. et la société Google Inc à verser un euro de dommages intérêts à la société Lyonnaise de garantie,

. Déboute la société Lyonnaise de garantie de ses autres demandes,

. Condamne in solidum Eric S. et la société Google Inc à payer à Pierre B. une somme de 5000 € sur le fondement de l’article 700 du code de procédure civile,

. Ordonne l’exécution provisoire,

. Condamne Eric S. et la société Google Inc aux entiers dépens.

Le tribunal : M. Dominique Lefebvre-Ligneul (vice-président), M. Joël Boyer et Mme Marie Mongin (assesseurs)

Avocats : Me Pierre Buisson, Me Alexandra Neri

Tribunal de Grande Instance de Paris 17ème chambre Jugement du 8 septembre 2010

M. X… /Google Inc., Eric S. et Google France

diffamation – directeur de la publication – moteur de recherche – condamnation – internet – suggestion

FAITS ET PROCEDURE

Vu l’assignation à jour fixe que M. X a fait délivrer, par acte en date du 19 mai 2010, après y avoir été autorisé par décision prise sur délégation du président du tribunal, à Eric S., en sa qualité de directeur de publication du site internet www.google.fr, à la société de droit américain Google Inc. et à la société française Google France :

  • exposant que le moteur de recherche Google offre depuis septembre 2008 une nouvelle fonctionnalité dénommée “Google Suggest” qui propose aux internautes qui effectuent une recherche, et à partir des premières lettres du mot qu’ils ont saisies, un menu déroulant de propositions qui comporte une liste de requêtes possibles les dispensant d’avoir à taper le libellé complet de leur recherche, ainsi qu’une liste de “Recherches associées” proposant aux internautes d’autres requêtes possibles, supposées proches de leur requête initiale,
  • ajoutant qu’ayant été condamné par le tribunal correctionnel de Paris du chef du délit de corruption de mineure, par décision du 3 novembre 2008, à une peine d’emprisonnement de quatre ans dont un an avec sursis et à une peine d’amende de 10 000 €, condamnation ramenée par arrêt de la cour d’appel de Paris en date du 5 février 2010 à la peine de trois ans d’emprisonnement avec sursis et 50 000 € d’amende -décision non définitive-, il a constaté que les fonctionnalités “Google Suggest” et “Recherches associées” proposaient aux internautes saisissant ses prénom et nom sur le moteur de recherche des items de recherche tels que “M. X… viol”, “M. X… condamné”, “M. X… sataniste”, “M. X… prison” et “M. X…violeur”,
  • soutenant que l’association de ces mots constitue une diffamation publique envers un particulier, quel que soit le contenu des articles ou documents auxquels lesdites requêtes renvoient,
  • expliquant avoir adressé en vain plusieurs mises en demeure aux sociétés Google Inc, Google France et à Eric S., en sa qualité de directeur de publication, auxquelles il fut répondu par des fins de non-recevoir au motif que les suggestions de recherche proposées aux internautes résultaient d’un système automatisé depuis une base de données recensant les libellés de recherche les plus fréquemment utilisés par les internautes,
  • sollicitant au visa des articles 29, alinéa 1, 32, alinéa 1, de la loi du 29 juillet 1881, pris ensemble, les articles 93-2 et 93-3 de la loi du 29 juillet 1982,
  • que soit ordonnée la suppression de ces termes dans les suggestions de recherche proposées par les fonctionnalités susdites, sous astreinte de 20 000 € par infraction constatée, dans un délai de 48 heures à compter du prononcé du jugement,
  • la condamnation in solidum d’Eric S. en sa qualité de directeur de publication, et des deux sociétés Google à lui verser la somme de 100 000 € à titre de dommages et intérêts en réparation du préjudice subi,
  • une mesure de publication judiciaire durant trois mois sur le haut de la page d’accueil du sitewww.google.fr, sous astreinte de 5000 € par jour de retard,
  • une indemnité de 10 000 € sur le fondement de l’article 700 du code de procédure civile.

Vu les écritures en défense des sociétés Google Inc, Google France et de Eric S. qui concluent au débouté aux motifs :

  • que l’affichage des expressions litigieuses ne saurait caractériser une allégation diffamatoire n’étant pas le fait de la pensée consciente mais un résultat d’algorithme,
  • que cet affichage n’exprime rien d’autre que la fréquence des recherches entreprises par les internautes à partir du moteur de recherche Google sur de tels mots,
  • qu’au demeurant les expressions en cause ne sont pas suffisamment précises ni circonstanciées pour constituer des diffamations et ne sauraient être regardées comme portant atteinte à l’honneur ou à la considération du demandeur, l’association du nom de ce dernier avec les mots en cause signifiant seulement, comme le savent les internautes, que le patronyme du demandeur et les qualificatifs litigieux figurent dans un même texte auquel le moteur de recherche renvoie,
  • qu’Eric S. ne saurait voir sa responsabilité recherchée en sa qualité de directeur de publication, faute de fixation préalable du message en cause,
  • qu’en l’absence de faute de sa part, la société Google Inc devrait, elle-même, être mise hors de cause,
  • qu’en tout état de cause, la société Google France doit être mise hors de cause n’ayant aucune responsabilité dans le fonctionnement du moteur de recherche Google,
  • contestant subsidiairement tout préjudice et le caractère proportionné des mesures de réparation sollicitées,
  • sollicitant enfin la condamnation du demandeur à payer une somme de 25 000 € à la société Google Inc et à Eric S., pris ensemble, et celle de 7500 € à la société Google France, sur le fondement de l’article 700 du code de procédure civile,

DISCUSSION

La société Google Inc a complété, en septembre 2008, son moteur de recherche accessible en France à l’adresse www.google.fr, par une fonctionnalité, dite “Google Suggest” qui offre aux internautes effectuant une recherche, à partir des premières lettres du mot qu’ils saisissent, un menu déroulant de propositions qui comporte une liste de dix requêtes possibles, un simple “clic” sur la requête proposée les dispensant, le cas échéant, d’avoir à taper le libellé complet de leur recherche.

Une fonctionnalité distincte de “Google Suggest” affiche en outre, sur certaines pages de résultats, sous la bannière “Recherches associées”, d’autres propositions de recherche, supposées proches de celle que l’internaute a saisie lors de sa requête initiale.

M. X…, qui s’est trouvé impliqué dans une affaire de corruption de mineure, pour laquelle il a été condamné par arrêt de la cour d’appel de Paris –à ce jour non définitif- en date du 5 février 2010 à une peine de trois ans d’emprisonnement avec sursis et de 50 000 € d’amende, a fait constater le 26 mars 2010 par le Centre d’Expertise des Logiciels que ces nouvelles fonctionnalités avaient, dans son cas, pour effet :

  • dès que les lettres suivantes “M. X…” étaient saisies par l’internaute sur le moteur de recherche Google.fr de faire apparaître les suggestions de recherche suivantes parmi un total de dix suggestions : “M. X… viol”, “M. X… condamné”, “M. X… sataniste”, “M. X… prison”,
  • lorsque l’internaute saisit le nom complet du demandeur, de faire apparaître les mêmes propositions, complétées par la suggestion de recherche “M. X… violeur”, soit six suggestions sur les dix proposées,
  • de présenter au titre de la rubrique “Recherches associées”, lorsque l’interrogation ne porte que sur ses seuls nom et prénom, les propositions suivantes : “M. X… viol”, “M. X… prison”, “M. X… violeur”, “M. X… condamné”, outre deux autres propositions étrangères au présent litige : “procès M. X…et “M. X… justice”.

Le demandeur se plaint de s’être heurté à une fin de non-recevoir lorsqu’il a sollicité des défendeurs par lettre recommandée avec avis de réception la suppression de telles propositions de recherche dont il estime qu’elles constituent des diffamations publiques envers un particulier.

Eric S. et la société Google Inc produisent une attestation de David K., responsable de ces produits, indiquant :

  • que ces derniers fonctionnent de manière purement automatique à partir d’une base de données qui recense les requêtes effectivement saisies sur Google au cours de la période récente par un nombre minimum d’internautes ayant les mêmes préférences linguistiques et territoriales,
  • que les résultats affichés dépendent d’un algorithme basé sur les requêtes des autres utilisateurs sans aucune intervention humaine ou reclassification de ces résultats par Google,
  • que l’ordre des requêtes est entièrement déterminé par le nombre d’internautes ayant utilisé chacune des requêtes, la plus fréquente apparaissant en tête de liste.

Les défendeurs soulignent en outre qu’une rubrique accessible sous la fenêtre “En savoir plus” de la page d’accueil du moteur de recherche précise : “Lors de la saisie, Google Suggest renvoie des termes de recherche fondés sur les activités de recherche des autres utilisateurs. Ces requêtes sont déterminées de manière algorithmique sur la base d’un certain nombre de facteurs purement objectifs, tels que la popularité des termes de recherche, sans intervention humaine. Tous les termes de recherche de Google Suggest ont été précédemment saisis par d’autres utilisateurs de Google. Notre base de données est fréquemment mise à jour afin de proposer des termes de recherches actualisés.”

Ils en infèrent, pour l’essentiel, que le caractère essentiellement technique et mathématique des procédés utilisés pour proposer de telles suggestions de recherche aux internautes ne saurait en rien engager leur responsabilité, que les libellés litigieux sont dépourvus de signification intrinsèque, indiquant seulement, comme les internautes ne peuvent manquer de le savoir, que les mots associés se trouvent dans un même texte auquel le moteur de recherche renvoie, et que seule l’actualité éditoriale ou médiatique de l’affaire dans laquelle le demandeur s’est trouvé impliqué explique de tels résultats, dont elle souligne en outre le caractère sinon éphémère du moins provisoire, dès lors qu’ils sont indexés sur la curiosité humaine, par nature instable.

Considérations générales relativement aux enjeux des deux fonctionnalités en litige

Il sera relevé au préalable sur l’argumentaire technique des défendeurs :

  • que les algorithmes ou les solutions logicielles procèdent de l’esprit humain avant que d’être mis en œuvre,
  • que les défendeurs ne produisent aucune pièce -autre que l’attestation de leur préposé David K.- établissant que les suggestions faites aux internautes procéderaient effectivement, comme ils le soutiennent, des chiffres bruts des requêtes antérieurement saisies sur le même thème, sans intervention humaine,
  • qu’il résulte à cet égard du constat non contesté du Celog que pour une même recherche sur les seuls prénom et nom “M. X…” les items proposés par la fonctionnalité “Google Suggest” et “Recherches associées” ne sont pas identiques ; ainsi la proposition “M. X… sataniste” apparaît sur “Google Suggest” alors qu’elle n’est pas faite au titre des “Recherches associées” et “Procès M. X…” et “M. X… justice” apparaissent au titre de ces dernières alors qu’ils ne sont pas indiqués par “Google Suggest”, ce qui laisse penser que les deux services ne reposent pas, comme il est soutenu, sur un pur calcul algorithmique neutre exclusivement basé sur le nombre brut des requêtes des internautes, lequel devrait alors offrir des résultats identiques,
  • qu’il n’est pas sans intérêt d’observer, avec le demandeur, qu’un service de même nature offert par un autre moteur de recherche (“Yahoo”) livre, pour une recherche identique sur ses prénom et nom, des résultats tout à fait différents,
  • que loin de la neutralité technologique prétendue des deux services en cause, par leur libellé même, les items de recherche litigieux sont incontestablement de nature à orienter la curiosité ou à appeler l’attention sur les thèmes qu’ils proposent ou suggèrent et, ce faisant, de nature à provoquer un “effet boule de neige” d’autant plus préjudiciable à qui en fait l’objet que le libellé le plus accrocheur se retrouvera ainsi plus rapidement en tête de liste des recherches proposées,
  • qu’au regard de ces considérations d’ordre général, il doit être relevé que tous les libellés de recherches lancées par les internautes ne sont pas pris en compte par le moteur de recherche Google dans le souci, notamment, d’éviter les suggestions “qui pourraient offenser un grand nombre d’utilisateurs” tels que “les termes grossiers”- comme il est précisé dans le jugement, versé aux présents débats par le demandeur, rendu par cette même chambre le 4 décembre 2009, sur la foi d’une note alors produite par la société Google Inc-, ce qui suppose nécessairement qu’un tri préalable soit fait entre les requêtes enregistrées dans la base de données,
  • que de même, le site google.fr invitait les internautes -comme l’a retenu cette chambre dans le même jugement du 4 décembre 2009- à signaler “des requêtes qui ne devraient pas être suggérées”, de sorte que le tribunal est fondé à comprendre qu’une intervention humaine est possible, propre à rectifier des suggestions jusqu’alors proposées,
  • que si cette note n’est plus produite par les sociétés défenderesses dans le cadre de la présente instance, une notice depuis lors actualisée et moins explicite paraissant y avoir été substituée, cette dernière –pièce 17 des défendeurs- livre encore, à la question “Est-ce que Google exclut de Google Suggest certaines requêtes d’utilisateurs ?”, la réponse suivante : “[…] Nous appliquons également un ensemble restreint de politiques de suppression en ce qui concerne la pornographie, la violence et la haine”, ce qui confirme la possibilité au moins a posteriori d’une intervention humaine propre à éviter les dommages les plus évidents liés aux fonctionnalités en cause,
  • que les défendeurs ne sauraient sérieusement invoquer l’atteinte à la liberté d’expression que constituerait en elle-même l’intervention judiciaire visant, dans les cas et aux conditions prévues par la loi, à rétablir un particulier dans ses droits en ordonnant, le cas échéant, la suppression de telle association de mots ou expressions avec son nom alors que le service offert par “Google Suggest” a pour seule utilité d’éviter aux internautes d’avoir à saisir sur leur ordinateur l’entier libellé de leur requête, et qu’en tout état de cause la suppression éventuelle de tel ou tel des thèmes de recherche proposés ne priverait aucun d’entre eux de la faculté de disposer, mais à leur seule initiative et sans y être incité par quiconque, de toutes les références indexées par le moteur de recherches correspondant à telle association de mots avec tel patronyme ou telle raison sociale de leur choix,
  • que dans le cas d’espèce, le demandeur a adressé des mises en demeure à la société Google Inc, à la société Google France et à Eric S. pour appeler leur attention sur les suggestions et propositions litigieuses qui ont reçu une réponse en forme de fin de non-recevoir, ce qui atteste que les responsables du moteur de recherche Google n’ignoraient plus la situation dénoncée par M. X… à compter du 27 avril 2010 – date de la dernière mise en demeure.

C’est au regard de ces considérations générales que sera apprécié le mérite des demandes.

Sur le caractère diffamatoire des propos incriminés

Il sera rappelé que l’article 29 de la loi du 29 juillet 1881 définit la diffamation comme “toute allégation ou imputation d’un fait qui porte atteinte à l’honneur ou à la considération de la personne”, le fait imputé étant entendu comme devant être suffisamment précis, détachable du débat d’opinion et distinct du jugement de valeur pour pouvoir, le cas échéant, faire l’objet d’un débat probatoire utile, étant relevé que l’imputation d’un fait attentatoire à l’honneur ou à la considération demeure punissable même si elle est présentée sous forme déguisée, dubitative ou par voie d’insinuation.

Il n’est pas douteux que l’association au patronyme du demandeur des mots ou qualificatifs suivants “viol”, “ condamné”, “sataniste”, “prison” et “ violeur” est tout sauf dépourvue de signification, à la fois pour l’intéressé lui-même et pour les internautes qui se connectent au site google.fr, lesquels se voient proposer de tels thèmes de recherche alors même qu’ils ne les soupçonnaient pas ou n’avaient nullement l’intention d’orienter leurs recherches sur de tels sujets.

L’affichage non sollicité des expressions “M. X… viol”, “M. X… condamné”, “M. X… sataniste”, “M. X… prison” et “M. X… violeur”, fait nécessairement peser sur l’intéressé sinon une imputation directe de faits attentatoires à l’honneur ou à la considération du moins la suspicion de s’être trouvé compromis dans une affaire de viol, de satanisme, d’avoir été condamné ou d’avoir fait de la prison.

Ces propositions, prises séparément, et plus encore associées les unes aux autres, constituent ainsi, au moins par insinuation, des faits précis susceptibles de preuve et évidemment de nature à jeter l’opprobre sur qui en est l’objet.

Enfin, les défendeurs ne sauraient utilement soutenir qu’elles ne sauraient être lues séparément des articles auxquels elles renvoient alors que les internautes qui ne les ont pas sollicitées, les voient s’afficher sous leurs yeux et peuvent ne pas se connecter aux sites concernés, ayant seulement retenu ce qu’elles indiquaient et signifiaient.

Sur la bonne foi

C’est vainement que les défendeurs excipent de l’excuse de bonne foi, laquelle ne peut être caractérisée -les imputations diffamatoires étant, de droit, réputées faites avec intention de nuire- que par un but légitime, étranger à toute animosité personnelle, une enquête sérieuse et la prudence dans l’expression, alors qu’ils soutiennent que les propositions affichées sont dépourvues de sens et ne signifient nullement ce que chacun peut y lire, renvoyant seulement à des articles indexés comportant les mots qui constituent les expressions litigieuses.

Sur la responsabilité d’Eric S. en sa qualité de directeur de publication

C’est à tort qu’Eric S., qui ne conteste pas sa qualité de directeur de publication du site google.fr, fait valoir que sa responsabilité ne saurait être engagée, faute pour les propos en cause d’avoir fait l’objet d’une fixation préalable au sens de l’article 93-3 de la loi du 29 juillet 1982, alors que les défendeurs reconnaissent que les suggestions proposées aux internautes procèdent d’eux-mêmes et de nul autre, à partir d’une base de données qu’ils ont précisément constituée pour ce faire, en lui appliquant des algorithmes de leur invention et que le système mis en place a précisément pour vocation d’anticiper les éventuelles requêtes des internautes.

La responsabilité de la société Google Inc sera de même retenue en sa qualité de civilement responsable.

En revanche, c’est à bon droit que la société Google France sollicite sa mise hors de cause, n’ayant pas de responsabilité directe dans le fonctionnement du moteur de recherche ni dans le site google.fr.

Sur les mesures de réparation

Il sera fait droit à la demande de suppression des suggestions et propositions litigieuses sous une astreinte de 500 € par manquement constaté et par jour, à l’expiration d’un délai d’un mois courant à compter de la signification de la présente décision.

La mesure de publication judiciaire sur la page d’accueil du site google.fr excéderait ce que commande le souci d’une juste réparation, au regard des faits de la cause, les deux fonctionnalités litigieuses n’étant nullement illicites en elles-mêmes mais de nature, dans le cas d’espèce, à caractériser une atteinte aux droits du demandeur.

M. X… est mal fondé à invoquer au titre du préjudice qu’il allègue la médiatisation du fait divers auquel il a été mêlé, la société Google Inc, pris ensemble le directeur de publication, n’étant responsable que de l’activité éditoriale du site www.google.fr et de nul autre. Il lui sera alloué un euro à titre de dommages intérêts.

Il sera accordé une somme de 5000 € à M. X… sur le fondement de l’article 700 du code de procédure civile.

L’exécution provisoire, compatible avec la nature du litige, sera prononcée.

DECISION

Statuant publiquement, par décision contradictoire mise à disposition au greffe et en premier ressort,

. Ordonne à Eric S., en sa qualité de directeur de publication du site internet accessible à l’adresse www.google.fr, de prendre toute mesure pour supprimer des suggestions apparaissant sur le service “Google Suggest” ou des propositions de requêtes faites dans la rubrique “Recherches associées”, à la saisie sur le moteur de recherche Google par les internautes des lettres “M. X…” ou “M. X….”, les expressions suivantes :

  • “M. X… viol”,
  • “M. X… condamné”,
  • “M. X… sataniste”,
  • “M. X… prison”,
  • “M. X… violeur”, et ce dans un délai d’un mois à compter de la signification de la présente décision sous une astreinte de 500 € par manquement constaté et par jour, à l’expiration d’un délai d’un mois courant à compter de la signification de la présente décision,

. Déclare la société Google Inc civilement responsable in solidum avec Eric S. de l’exécution de cette injonction de faire sous astreinte,

. Met hors de cause la société Google France,

. Condamne in solidum Eric S. et la société Google Inc à verser un euro de dommages-intérêts à M. X…,

. Déboute M. X… de ses autres demandes,

. Condamne in solidum Eric S. et la société Google Inc à payer à M. X… une somme de 5000 € sur le fondement de l’article 700 du code de procédure civile,

. Ordonne l’exécution provisoire,

. Condamne Eric S. et la société Google Inc aux entiers dépens.

Le tribunal : Mme Anne-Marie Sauteraud (vice-président), M. Joël Boyer (vice-président, M. Alain Bourla (premier-juge)

Avocats : SCP Chemouli Dauzier et associés, Me Alexandra Neri

Tribunal de grande instance de Paris 17ème chambre Jugement du 15 février 2012

Kriss Laure / Larry P., Google Inc.

directeur de la publication – responsabilité – moteur de recherche – injure – fonctionnalité – réparation – suppression – suggestion

FAITS ET PROCÉDURE

Vu l’assignation à jour fixe que la société en nom collectif Kriss Laure a fait délivrer, par acte en date du 4 mai 2011, après y avoir été autorisée par décision prise sur délégation du président du tribunal, à la société de droit californien Google Inc., et à Larry P., en sa qualité de Chief Executive Producer de cette dernière, assignation dénoncée au ministère public le 9 mai suivant,

  • exposant que le moteur de recherche Google offre depuis septembre 2008 une fonctionnalité dénommée “Google Suggest” qui propose aux internautes qui effectuent une recherche, à partir des premières lettres du mot qu’ils ont saisies, un menu déroulant de propositions qui comporte une liste de requêtes possibles les dispensant d’avoir à taper le libellé complet de leur recherche,
  • ajoutant avoir constaté par huissier le 25 mars 2011 que la saisie sur le moteur de recherche Google des lettres “kriss I” ou “kriss laure”, fait apparaître la suggestion “kriss laure secte “, aux deuxième et troisième rangs parmi une liste de dix suggestions de recherche alors proposées aux internautes, et ce sur le moteur accessible à l’adresse google.fr,
  • soutenant que l’association de ces mots constitue une injure publique envers un particulier, quel que soit le contenu des articles ou documents auxquels lesdites requêtes renvoient,
  • faisant valoir avoir adressé en vain, par lettre recommandée adressée à la société Google France le 11 mars 2011, une mise en demeure de supprimer les termes “kriss laure secte” des suggestions proposées par le moteur de recherche Google.fr, à laquelle il était répondu que le moteur de recherche Google.fr était exploité par la société de droit américain Google Inc., laquelle l’avait chargé de répondre que la demande de suppression de cette suggestion n’était pas possible au motif que les suggestions de recherche proposées aux internautes résultaient d’un système automatisé depuis une base de données recensant les libellés de recherche les plus fréquemment utilisés par les internautes,
  • sollicitant au visa des articles 29, alinéa 2, 33, alinéa 2, de la loi du 29 juillet 1881, pris ensemble, les articles 93-2 et 93-3 de la loi du 29 juillet 1982 :
  • (1) que soit ordonnée la suppression de ces termes dans les suggestions de recherche proposées par Google.fr, sous astreinte de 5000 € par infraction constatée, dans un délai de deux jours à compter de la signification du jugement,
  • (2) la condamnation in solidum de Larry P. et de la société Google Inc. à lui verser la somme de 50 000 € à titre de dommages et intérêts en réparation du préjudice subi,
  • (3) une mesure de publication judiciaire pendant sept jours consécutifs sur la page d’accueil du site www.google.fr, sous astreinte de 500 € par jour de retard à compter de la signification du jugement,
  • (4) ainsi que dans trois revues spécialisées au choix de Kriss Laure dans la limite de 3000 € par insertion,
  • (5) outre une indemnité de 10 000 € sur le fondement de l’article 700 du code de procédure civile, laquelle a été portée à la somme de 12 000 € dans ses dernières conclusions du 16 mars 2011,
  • (6) le tout sous le bénéfice de l’exécution provisoire ;

Vu les écritures en défense de la société Google Inc. et de Larry P. déposées le 10 novembre 2011,

  • invoquant en premier lieu la nullité de l’acte introductif d’instance faute de dénonciation au ministère public, moyen abandonné à l’audience,
  • en deuxième lieu que les dispositions de la loi française prévoyant la responsabilité de plein droit dite “en cascade” du directeur de la publication ne peuvent trouver application s’agissant d’une société étrangère, aucun élément de responsabilité personnelle de droit commun n’étant établi à l’encontre de Larry P., et que par voie de conséquence, en l’absence de faute de sa part, la société Google Inc. devrait, elle-même, être mise hors de cause,

qui, subsidiairement, concluent au débouté aux motifs :

  • que l’affichage d’une prévision de recherche dans le cadre de la fonctionnalité de saisie semi-automatique relève de la liberté de recevoir et communiquer des informations protégée par l’article 10 de la convention de sauvegarde des droits de l’homme et des libertés fondamentales,
  • que l’affichage de l’expression litigieuse ne saurait caractériser une injure publique n’étant pas le fait d’une personne physique mais d’un traitement de données, et en tout état de cause, n’étant pas le fait de la pensée consciente mais un résultat d’algorithme,
  • que cet affichage n’exprime rien d’autre que la fréquence des recherches entreprises par les internautes à partir du moteur de recherche Google sur de tels mots,
  • qu’à supposer que le propos soit injurieux, l’élément intentionnel de l’infraction fait défaut, la présomption de mauvaise foi de la responsabilité en cascade étant contraire au procès équitable, une machine ne pouvant, en outre, faire preuve de mauvaise foi,
  • qu’il n’exprime rien en lui-même, étant dépourvu de toute signification sémantique, ce dont les internautes sont informés par une rubrique “En savoir plus” relative au fonctionnement de la saisie semi-automatique,
  • contestant, subsidiairement, tout préjudice et le caractère justifié ou proportionné des mesures de réparation sollicitées,
  • sollicitant enfin la condamnation de la société demanderesse à payer à la société Google Inc. une somme de 10 000 €, sur le fondement de l’article 700 du code de procédure civile ;

Vu les dernières écritures de la société Kriss Laure en date du 7 octobre 2011 ;
Vu l’autorisation qui a été donnée à la société Kriss Laure lors de l’audience de plaidoiries, d’adresser au tribunal une note en délibéré pour commenter la pièce n° 35-2 des défendeurs qui a été tardivement communiquée, pièce consistant dans la traduction d‘un jugement rendu par le tribunal fédéral de Cologne le 19 octobre 2011 ;
Vu le courrier adressé par les défendeurs le 15 novembre 2011 informant le tribunal qu’une nouvelle version, plus fidèle, de la traduction de ce jugement avait été communiquée à la société demanderesse et transmettant cette nouvelle traduction ;

Vu la note en délibéré en date du 18 novembre suivant, de la société Kriss Laure :

  • sollicitant le rejet de cette nouvelle version de la traduction du jugement communiquée postérieurement à la clôture des débats,
  • le rejet de la version initiale de la pièce n° 35-2 communiquée le jour de l’audience,
  • et, soulignant, qu’en toute hypothèse, cette décision d’une juridiction allemande est dépourvue de pertinence dans un litige où le droit français est seul applicable ;

Vu la réponse des défendeurs par Courier en date du 25 novembre ;

DISCUSSION

Sur la demande tendant à ce que soit écartée des débats la traduction du jugement allemand produite par les défendeurs

Attendu, s’agissant de la première traduction de ce jugement communiquée par les défendeurs le jour de l’audience des plaidoiries (pièce n° 35-2), que la demanderesse a demandé et obtenu l’autorisation de s’expliquer sur cette pièce par une note en délibéré ; que malgré la communication tardive de cette pièce, il sera considéré que le principe du contradictoire a été respecté par l’usage de cette faculté ;

Attendu, s’agissant de la deuxième version de cette traduction, qualifiée de plus “compréhensible”, produite par les défendeurs le lendemain de l’audience sans y avoir été autorisés, qu’il convient, ainsi que le demande la société Kriss Laure, de la rejeter des débats, de nouvelles pièces, même s’il s’agit de la simple traduction d’un document, dès lors qu’il existe une contestation sur leur production, ne pouvant être produites après l’audience plaidoiries ;

Qu’il sera relevé, surabondamment, qu’aucune partie ne prétend que le droit allemand serait applicable au présent litige ;

Sur le fond

Attendu que la société Google Inc. a complété, en septembre 2008, son moteur de recherche accessible en France à l’adresse www.google.fr. par une fonctionnalité, dite “Google Suggest” qui offre aux internautes effectuant une recherche, à partir des premières lettres du mot qu’ils saisissent, un menu déroulant de propositions qui comporte une liste de requêtes possibles, un simple “clic” sur la requête proposée les dispensant, le cas échéant, d’avoir à taper le libellé complet de leur recherche ;

Que ce service répond à l’appellation “Prévisions de recherche” ; qu’il est présenté comme un service de “saisie semi-automatique” qui permet aux utilisateurs de “profiter de l‘expérience des autres utilisateurs”, en portant à leur connaissance les requêtes “les plus populaires déjà tapées par les internautes qui commencent par ces lettres ou mots” ;

Attendu que la société Kriss Laure est une société en nom collectif qui a pour activité la “vente directe, en marketing de réseaux, de gammes de produits diététiques naturels destinés aux régimes hypocaloriques” ; qu’elle a constaté au mois de mars 2011, puis fait constater par huissier le 25 mars 2011, que la saisie sur le moteur de recherche Google des lettres “kriss I” et “kriss laure “, faisait apparaître la suggestion “kriss laure secte “, aux troisième et deuxième rangs des dix suggestions de recherche proposées aux internautes ;

Que la société demanderesse se plaint de s’être heurtée à un refus lorsqu’elle a demandé à la société Google France, par lettre recommandée avec avis de réception du 11 mars 2011, la suppression de ces propositions de recherche dont elle estime qu’elles constituent des injures publiques envers un particulier ;

Attendu que les défendeurs se fondent sur le fait que la prévision de recherche n’exprimant pas une pensée humaine mais “le seul aboutissement d’un processus entièrement informatisé fonctionnant de manière totalement automatique“, le délit poursuivi ne saurait être caractérisé faute d’élément matériel comme d’élément intentionnel ;

Qu’ils produisent une attestation (non datée et établie pour un autre litige) de David K., responsable de la base de données, indiquant :

  • que ce service fonctionne de manière purement automatique à partir d’une base de données qui recense les requêtes effectivement saisies sur Google au cours de la période récente par un nombre minimum d’internautes ayant les mêmes préférences linguistiques et territoriales,
  • que les résultats affichés dépendent d’un algorithme basé sur les recherches des autres utilisateurs sans aucune intervention humaine ou reclassification de ces résultats par Google,
  • que l’ordre des requêtes est entièrement déterminé par le nombre d’internautes ayant utilisé chacune des requêtes, la plus fréquente apparaissant en tête de liste,
  • que l’intérêt principal de cet outil est de permettre à l’internaute de gagner du temps, accessoirement de “l’aider à trouver des résultats pertinents auxquels il n‘a pas nécessairement pense” ;

Que les défendeurs soulignent, en outre, qu’une rubrique accessible sous la fenêtre “En savoir plus” de la page d’accueil du moteur de recherche précise le “fonctionnement de la saisie semi-automatique” :
“A mesure que vous saisissez vos termes de recherche, l’algorithme Google prédit et affiche des requêtes basées sur les activités de recherche des autres internautes. Ces recherches sont déterminées, par le biais d’un algorithme, en fonction d’un certain nombre de facteurs purement objectif (dont la popularité des termes de recherche), sans intervention humaine. Toutes les requêtes de prédiction affichées ont été déjà saisies par le passé par d‘autres utilisateurs de Google. La base de données de la saisie semi-automatique Google est régulièrement mise à jour afin de proposer les dernières requêtes du moment. (…)“ ;

Qu’ils en déduisent, pour l’essentiel, que le caractère technique et mathématique des procédés utilisés pour proposer de telles suggestions de recherche aux internautes ne saurait en rien engager leur responsabilité, que les libellés litigieux sont dépourvus de signification intrinsèque, indiquant seulement, comme les internautes ne peuvent manquer de le savoir, que les mots associés se trouvent dans un même texte auquel le moteur de recherche renvoie, et que seule l’actualité éditoriale ou médiatique relative à la société demanderesse explique l’affichage du résultat contesté, dont ils soulignent en outre le caractère sinon éphémère du moins provisoire, dès lors qu’ils sont indexés sur la curiosité par nature instable des internautes ;

Sur la fonctionnalité en litige et ses enjeux

Attendu qu’il convient de relever s’agissant de l’argumentaire technique des défendeurs :

  • que les algorithmes ou les solutions logicielles procèdent de l’esprit humain avant que d’être mis en œuvre ; que bien que les défendeurs contestent la pertinence de cet argument en faisant valoir que les ingénieurs, à l’origine de ces algorithmes, ou Larry P., représentant de la société gérant ce système de suggestion, ne peuvent anticiper les résultats spécifiques qui découleront de leur mise en œuvre, il demeure néanmoins que le système en cause procède effectivement de l’intervention et de la décision humaine, non seulement quant à sa mise en œuvre soit les algorithmes qui le font fonctionner, mais également quant aux objectifs poursuivis qui sont très clairement exprimés dans l’attestation de David K. versée aux débats par les défendeurs, soit, non seulement de faire “gagner du temps” à l’internaute, mais également “de l’aider à trouver des résultats pertinents auxquels il n’a pas nécessairement pensé” en retenant comme critère essentiel “la popularité des termes de recherche” ; qu’ainsi il ne peut être déduit de la prétendu automaticité et neutralité du fonctionnement de ce système, et même si d’autres moteurs de recherche utilisent également ce même mode de suggestion, que ceux qui prennent l’initiative de le faire fonctionner, pourraient se décharger de toute responsabilité quant à ses conséquences,
  • que les défendeurs ne produisent aucune pièce -autre que les attestations de deux de leur préposés David K. et Yosi M. – établissant que les suggestions faites aux internautes procéderaient effectivement, comme ils le soutiennent, des chiffres bruts des requêtes antérieurement saisies sur le même thème, sans intervention humaine,
  • que loin de la neutralité technologique prétendue dudit service, l’item litigieux, qui n’est nullement saisi par l’internaute mais apparaît spontanément à la saisie des premières lettres de sa recherche comme une proposition de recherche possible, est incontestablement de nature à orienter la curiosité ou à appeler l’attention sur le thème proposé et, ce faisant, de nature à provoquer un “effet boule de neige” d’autant plus préjudiciable à qui en fait l’objet que le libellé le plus accrocheur se retrouvera ainsi plus rapidement en tête de liste des recherches proposées, que ce point est confirmé par l’attestation précitée de David K.,
  • qu’au regard de ces considérations d’ordre général, il doit être relevé que tous les libellés de recherches lancées par les internautes ne sont pas pris en compte par le moteur de recherche Google ; que les défendeurs reconnaissent avoir placé “sur une liste noire, une série de termes intrinsèquement choquants, pornographiques ou grossiers pour éviter qu’ils n ‘apparaissent dans le libellé des requêtes supplémentaires fournies par la fonctionnalité de saisie semi-automatique“, ce qui suppose nécessairement qu’un tri préalable soit fait entre les requêtes enregistrées dans la base de données ; que ce fait est confirmé par le constat d’huissier établi à la requête de la demanderesse qui a constaté que sur le site de Google correspondant à ce système de recherche, à la rubrique “en savoir plus”, il était précisé “nous appliquons également des règles strictes s‘agissant des contenus pornographiques, violents ou incitant à la haine et des termes fréquemment utilisés pour rechercher des contenus portant atteinte à des droits d’auteur”, de sorte que le tribunal est fondé à comprendre qu’une intervention humaine est possible, propre à rectifier des suggestions jusqu’alors proposées, au moins a posteriori, afin d’éviter les dommages les plus évidents liés aux fonctionnalités en cause ;

Attendu, qu’en l’espèce, la société demanderesse a adressé, par lettre du 11 mars 2011, une mise en demeure à la société Google France, de supprimer l’expression litigieuse de ses suggestions, que par courrier du 21 mars suivant, Google France répondait pour le compte de Google Inc., par une fin de non-recevoir, ce qui atteste que les responsables du moteur de recherche Google n’ignoraient plus la situation dénoncée par elle à compter du 11 mars 2011 ; que la société demanderesse indique qu’à la même demande formulée auprès de la société Yahoo, dont le système de suggestion de recherche affichait également “kriss laure secte”, cette société a répondu favorablement à cette demande et a supprimé cette suggestion ;

Sur le caractère injurieux de propos incriminés

Attendu que l’article 29 de la loi du 29 juillet 1881 définit l’injure comme “toute expression outrageante, termes de mépris ou invective qui ne referme l’imputation d’aucun fait”, tandis que la diffamation consiste en l’allégation ou l’imputation d’un fait précis qui porte atteinte à l’honneur ou à la considération de la personne visé ;

Que le terme de “secte” s’il désignait à l’origine une communauté spirituelle, religieuse ou philosophique, est aujourd’hui empreint d’une connotation péjorative qui désigne sous ce vocable celles qui, parmi ces communautés se livrent à des pratiques moralement ou pénalement condamnables ; que faute de toute précision complémentaire et n’étant pas autrement circonstancié, le qualificatif “secte” constitue une invective et caractérise, en tout état de cause, un propos outrageant ; que ce caractère injurieux n’est d’ailleurs pas sérieusement contesté par les défendeurs ;

Que par ailleurs les défendeurs ne sauraient utilement soutenir qu’une telle expression ne peut être lue indépendamment des articles auxquels elle renvoie alors que les internautes qui ne l’ont pas sollicitée, la voient s’afficher sous leurs yeux et peuvent ne pas se connecter aux sites indexés, ayant seulement retenu ce qu’elle indiquait et signifiait, de sorte que, telles les manchettes d’une couverture de magazine affichée en kiosque qui se lisent indépendamment des articles auxquels elles renvoient en pages intérieures, l’affichage d’une suggestion de recherche non sollicitée doit se lire indépendamment des sites indexés par le moteur de recherche, auxquels l’internaute peut ne pas se connecter ;

Qu’en outre, c’est vainement que les défendeurs se fondent sur un sondage réalisé à leur demande pour soutenir que, pour “l‘internaute moyen”, les termes “kriss laure” et “secte” sont simplement les éléments constitutifs d’une requête“ et non une phrase dotée d’une signification et servant à qualifier telle ou telle personne” ; qu’en effet, et si l’on admet les affirmations des défendeurs sur ce point, la circonstance que cette suggestion soit comprise comme telle, ne fait pas obstacle à ce qu’elle ait une signification, qui est en l’occurrence incontestable et injurieuse ;

Que pour l’ensemble de ces motifs, l’injure publique sera regardée comme caractérisé en l’espèce ;

Sur la responsabilité de Larry P. en sa qualité de directeur de publication

Attendu que Larry Page qui reconnaît être, selon le droit californien régissant la société Google Inc., le représentant légal de cette société exploitant le système de prévision de recherche Google suggest, reconnaît également que la loi française est applicable au présent litige, mais conteste cependant que les dispositions des articles 92-2 et 92-3 de la loi du 29 juillet 1982 lui soient applicables en se fondant sur l’extranéité de la société éditrice de ce site internet et en invoquant l’application de principes dégagés en matière de presse écrite étrangère écartant la responsabilité dite “en cascade” prévue par la loi du 29 juillet 1881 ;

Attendu cependant que l’article 92-2 de la loi du 29 juillet 1982 prévoit l’obligation pour “tout service de communication au public par voie électronique” d’avoir un “directeur de la publication” précisant que lorsque le service est fourni par une personne morale le directeur de la publication est son représentant légal ;

Que la circonstance que cette personne morale est soumise à un droit étranger ne fait pas obstacle à l’application de ce texte dès lors que le représentant est celui désigné par le droit auquel est soumis la personne morale ; que rien ne s’oppose non plus à l’application de la responsabilité en cascade prévue par le droit français dès lors que c’est bien ce droit français qui s’applique au litige, ce qui est le cas en l’espèce ;

Attendu qu’il sera en outre relevé, quelque automatique que soit le cas échéant, le thème de recherche proposé par Google, qu’après la mise en demeure adressée par le conseil de la société demanderesse le 11 mars 2011, les défendeurs avaient la parfaite conscience que la fonctionnalité proposait, sur l’interrogation “kriss laure “, la réponse “kriss laure secte”, et que leur argumentation tenant à l’absence de connaissance personnelle de ces propos ne peut être accueillie ; qu’il sera observé que les défendeurs ont refusé de supprimer la suggestion litigieuse alors qu’un moteur de recherche concurrent a fait droit à cette demande de la société Kriss Laure ;

Que la responsabilité de Larry P., comme celle de la société Google Inc., doivent donc être retenues, celle-ci en qualité de civilement responsable ;

Sur le moyen pris des stipulations de l’article 10 de la convention de sauvegarde des droits de l’homme et des libertés fondamentales

Attendu que ce n’est pas sans contradiction que les défendeurs invoquent cette convention internationale ayant pour objet de consacrer les droits fondamentaux de la personne humaine alors que leur argument essentiel de défense consiste précisément à soutenir que les propos litigieux sont étrangers à la pensée de cette personne humaine ;

Attendu en toute hypothèse, que cette fonction de suggestion de recherche ne participe pas, comme le prétendent les défendeurs, à la circulation des idées mais a pour objet de faire gagner du temps aux internautes ou à attirer leur attention sur des associations de mots auxquelles ils n’avaient pas spontanément pensé ;

Qu’enfin, à supposer que ce texte trouve application s’agissant de ces propositions de recherche, la sanction de propos injurieux est prévue par la loi et par l’alinéa 2 de l’article 10 invoqué, nécessaire dans une société démocratique pour protéger les droits des tiers et parfaitement proportionnée au regard de l’objet de ce service ;

Sur les mesures de réparation

Attendu qu’il sera fait droit à la demande de suppression de la suggestion litigieuse sous une astreinte de 2500 € par manquement constaté et par jour, à l’expiration d’un délai d’un mois à compter de la signification de la présente décision ;

Que la mesure de publication judiciaire sur la page d’accueil de la version française du moteur de recherche www.google.fr ou dans d’autres publications de presse excéderait ce que commande une juste réparation, au regard des faits de la cause, la fonctionnalité litigieuse n’étant nullement illicite en elle-même mais de nature, dans le cas d’espèce, à caractériser une atteinte aux droits de la demanderesse ;

Attendu qu’il sera alloué un euro à titre de dommages intérêts à la société Kriss Laure ainsi qu’une somme de 4000 € sur le fondement de l’article 700 du code de procédure civile ;

Que l’exécution provisoire, compatible avec la nature du litige, sera prononcée ;

DÉCISION

Statuant publiquement, par décision contradictoire mise à disposition au greffe et en premier ressort,

. Donne acte aux défendeurs qu’ils renoncent au moyen de nullité tiré de l’absence de notification de l’assignation au ministère public, celle-ci ayant été notifiée dans les formes et délai prévu par l’article 53 de la loi du 29 juillet 1881,

. Ordonne à Larry P., en sa qualité de directeur de publication, et à la société Google Inc., en sa qualité de civilement responsable, du site internet accessible à l’adresse www.google.fr, de prendre toute mesure pour supprimer des suggestions apparaissant sur le service “Prévisions de recherche” ou “service de saisie semi-automatique” à la saisie sur le moteur de recherche Google par les internautes des lettres “kriss l” ou “kriss laure“, l’expression “kriss laure secte”, et ce dans un délai d’un mois à compter de la signification de la présente décision sous une astreinte de 2500 € par jour, à l’expiration d’un délai d’un mois à compter de la signification de la présente décision,

. Se réserve la liquidation de l’astreinte,

. Condamne in solidum Larry P. et la société Google Inc. à verser un euro de dommages-intérêts à la société Kriss Laure,

. Condamne in solidum Larry P. et la société Google Inc. à payer à la société Kriss Laure une somme de 4000 € sur le fondement de l’article 700 du code de procédure civile,

. Ordonne l’exécution provisoire,

. Déboute la société Kriss Laure de ses autres demandes,

. Condamne Larry P. et la société Google Inc. aux entiers dépens.

Le tribunal : Mme Marie Mongin (vice présidente), Mme Anne Marie Sauteraud et M. Claude Civalero (assesseurs)

Avocats : Me Isabelle Renard, Me Nicolas Herzog, Me Alexandra Neri